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Saint Petersburg (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
he Russian minister, who soon came in, explained the proposed cession which was the occasion of the summons, and indicated the boundary as traced by the Archduke Constantine in a personal interview with that minister who had just arrived from St. Petersburg. All then went to the department, where the treaty was being copied. Leutze painted the scene when the treaty was explained. A photograph of the picture is given in Seward's Life, vol. III. p. 349. Sumner listened, but gave no opinion, ward's Life, vol. III. p. 369). The speech was widely distributed as a pamphlet in this country. It exceeded ordinary newspaper limits, but the Boston Journal printed it, making nineteen and a half columns. An edition was published in St. Petersburg, with an introduction which noted Sumner's constant interest in the emancipation of the serfs, as well as his leadership in the kindred movement in the United States. From associates in public life, from scientific men, and from intelligent
Ann Arbor (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ience knew before of Tocqueville's visit; but the daughter of the landlord, at whose hotel the French visitor had lodged, speaking to Sumner after the lecture, recalled the strangers whose coming was a mystery. Beaumont was probably with Tocqueville. His lecturing tour extended as far west as St. Louis and Dubuque, and as far north as Milwaukee. The appointments which he filled were as follows: Pontiac, Mich., October 7; Grand Rapids, October 8; Lansing, October 9; Detroit, October 10; Ann Arbor, October 11; Battle Creek, October 12: Milwaukee, Wis., October 14; Ripon, October 15; Janesville, October 16; Belvidere, Ill.. October 17; Rockford, October 18; Dubuque, la., October 19; Bloomington, Il., October 21; Peoria, October 22: Galesburg, October 25; Chicago, October 29; St. Louis, Mo., November 1; Jacksonville, Ill., November 2; Quincy, November 4. Aurora, November 5; La Porte, Ind., November 6: Toledo, O., November 7. A severe cold, accompanied with hoarseness and exhaustion,
Copenhagen (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 9
o embarrass Raasloff at home, kept the matter alive,—refraining from final adverse action at his written request to Mr. Fish, the new Secretary of State,—and finally, on March 30, after he had been heard and left Washington, laid the treaty on the table, recording on its minutes the words, The understanding being that this was equivalent to a rejection, and was a gentler method of effecting it. A year later it cleared its docket by a report adverse to a ratification. Raasloff returned to Copenhagen, where, by public speech and private letter to Sumner, though not claiming him as a supporter of the ratification, he bore witness to his good offices in securing for it fair treatment. he also showed his estimate of the senator's discretion and influence, and his confidence in his kindly sentiments, by soliciting his friendly intervention in the embarrassed relations between Prussia and Denmark. The treaty then slept a long sleep, from which it has never waked. The unhappy negotiator,
Dubuque (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
strangers whose coming was a mystery. Beaumont was probably with Tocqueville. His lecturing tour extended as far west as St. Louis and Dubuque, and as far north as Milwaukee. The appointments which he filled were as follows: Pontiac, Mich., October 7; Grand Rapids, October 8; Lansing, October 9; Detroit, October 10; Ann Arbor, October 11; Battle Creek, October 12: Milwaukee, Wis., October 14; Ripon, October 15; Janesville, October 16; Belvidere, Ill.. October 17; Rockford, October 18; Dubuque, la., October 19; Bloomington, Il., October 21; Peoria, October 22: Galesburg, October 25; Chicago, October 29; St. Louis, Mo., November 1; Jacksonville, Ill., November 2; Quincy, November 4. Aurora, November 5; La Porte, Ind., November 6: Toledo, O., November 7. A severe cold, accompanied with hoarseness and exhaustion, obliged him to give up his engagements in Iowa (except at Dubuque), and to rest a few days in Chicago. At Dubuque his welcome was from Hon. William B. Allison, then a member
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
to, to obtain a two-thirds vote. The same day (January 9) that the Senate voted impartial suffrage as a fundamental condition in the admission of Nebraska and Colorado, it took up the House bill, which prohibited the denial of the elective franchise in the Territories on account of race or color. On the suggestion being made tind Congress to receive them back. In one word, it is only an instalment, and not a finality. I think you will be satisfied with the result on Nebraska and Colorado. The declaration that there shall be no exclusion from the elective franchise on account of color is not in the form which I preferred; but you have the declarae, says that it cannot be said now that the Republican party is not committed to negro suffrage. You have (1) The District bill; (2) The Nebraska bill; (3) The Colorado bill; and (4) The Territorial bill passed today, declaring that in the territories there shall be no exclusion from the suffrage on account of color. To Mr.
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
St. Louis and Dubuque, and as far north as Milwaukee. The appointments which he filled were as follows: Pontiac, Mich., October 7; Grand Rapids, October 8; Lansing, October 9; Detroit, October 10; Ann Arbor, October 11; Battle Creek, October 12: Milwaukee, Wis., October 14; Ripon, October 15; Janesville, October 16; Belvidere, Ill.. October 17; Rockford, October 18; Dubuque, la., October 19; Bloomington, Il., October 21; Peoria, October 22: Galesburg, October 25; Chicago, October 29; St. Louis, Mo., November 1; Jacksonville, Ill., November 2; Quincy, November 4. Aurora, November 5; La Porte, Ind., November 6: Toledo, O., November 7. A severe cold, accompanied with hoarseness and exhaustion, obliged him to give up his engagements in Iowa (except at Dubuque), and to rest a few days in Chicago. At Dubuque his welcome was from Hon. William B. Allison, then a member of the House, and since for a long period a senator, who made the arrangements for the lecture at that place. During th
Norwich (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e shows the conflicting opinions,—the purchase being approved by Professor Spencer Baird of the Smithsonian Institution, G. V. Fox, Commander John Rodgers, M. C. Meigs, Louis Agassiz, Agassiz wrote (April 6) of the immense natural resources of the country in fisheries, furs, and timber, and the space unoccupied by population opening before our race. Thaddeus Stevens, W. Beach Lawrence, and John M. Forbes, but disapproved by George S. Boutwell, B. R. Wood of Albany, and Moses Pierce of Norwich, Conn. With rare exceptions, generally those of officers of the navy and of the coast survey, incredulity as to the value of the territory prevailed in the eastern and middle sections of the country. To them it was an unknown land, as yet without a name, except that of Russian America. Sumner occupied in executive session, April 9, three hours in the explanation and defence of the treaty, speaking with a single sheet of notes before him; Works, vol. XI. pp. 181-349. and the ratification w
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 9
; Jan. 7, 24: Feb. 24, 1868; Congressional Globe, pp. 38, 151, 344– 346, 720, 1373; Feb. 11, 1869, Globe, p. 1080. He had a prohibition of the discrimination inserted in a bill amending the charter of the city of Washington, April 7, 1868; Globe, pp. 2260-2267. but his fourth effort at the beginning of President Grant's administration was successful. This is an illustration of his pertinacity. Sumner carried through at this time a resolution of sympathy with Crete in her struggle against Turkey, July 19, 1867; Works, vol. XI. pp. 426. Later he carried other resolutions of sympathy with Crete. July 21, 1868; Works, vol. XI. pp. 427, 428. another denouncing the Coolie trade, Jan. 16. 1867; Works, vol. XI. p. 82. and another prohibiting persons in our diplomatic service from wearing a uniform or official costume. March 20, 1867; Works, vol. XI. pp. 164-167. Other subjects in which Sumner took an interest were the reconstruction of the levees of the Mississippi, which he
Alaska (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
n territories, and in reconstructed states.—schools and homesteads for the Freedmen.—purchase of Alaska and of St. Thomas.—death of Sir Frederick Bruce.—Sumner on Fessenden and Edmunds.—the prophetic —a suggestion which is without proof, and contrary to the presumptions. The cession of Russian America to the United States, a territory of 570,000 square miles, took place at this time,—an acquions of the country. To them it was an unknown land, as yet without a name, except that of Russian America. Sumner occupied in executive session, April 9, three hours in the explanation and defence a marvel,—an essay or book rather than a speech, which sets out all that was then known of Russian America; its fisheries, furs, timber, minerals, physical features, climate, commerce, history, andmner applied the name of a promontory to the whole territory, and it was his choice which placed Alaska in the nomenclature of American States and Territories. Letter of Sumner to Hiram Ba
Galesburg (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
le. His lecturing tour extended as far west as St. Louis and Dubuque, and as far north as Milwaukee. The appointments which he filled were as follows: Pontiac, Mich., October 7; Grand Rapids, October 8; Lansing, October 9; Detroit, October 10; Ann Arbor, October 11; Battle Creek, October 12: Milwaukee, Wis., October 14; Ripon, October 15; Janesville, October 16; Belvidere, Ill.. October 17; Rockford, October 18; Dubuque, la., October 19; Bloomington, Il., October 21; Peoria, October 22: Galesburg, October 25; Chicago, October 29; St. Louis, Mo., November 1; Jacksonville, Ill., November 2; Quincy, November 4. Aurora, November 5; La Porte, Ind., November 6: Toledo, O., November 7. A severe cold, accompanied with hoarseness and exhaustion, obliged him to give up his engagements in Iowa (except at Dubuque), and to rest a few days in Chicago. At Dubuque his welcome was from Hon. William B. Allison, then a member of the House, and since for a long period a senator, who made the arrange
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