hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley 1,006 2 Browse Search
Londonderry, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) 71 1 Browse Search
Westhaven (Illinois, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Henry Clay 54 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 54 0 Browse Search
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) 50 0 Browse Search
James Watson Webb 46 0 Browse Search
Amos Bliss 44 2 Browse Search
New England (United States) 44 0 Browse Search
Bayard Taylor 42 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley. Search the whole document.

Found 140 total hits in 34 results.

1 2 3 4
Otsego, Allegan County, Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
r transgressions. Till then, keep a bright look out!) And Richard, too, shall have his share of the spoils of victory. He has earned them fairly, and, in the main, like a gentleman—making us no needless trouble, and we presume no needless expense. All was fair and above board, save some little specks in his opening of the case, which we noticed some hours ago, and have long since forgiven. For the rest, we rather like what we have seen of him; and if anybody has any law business in Otsego, or any libel suits to prosecute anywhere, we heartily recommend Richard to do the work, warranting the client to be handsomely taken in anti done for throughout. (There's a puff, now, a man may be proud of. We don't give such every day out of pure kindness. It was Fenimore, we believe, that said on the trial, that our word went a great way in this country.) Can we say a good word for you, gallant foeman? We'll praise any thing of yours we have read except the Monikins. But sadder th
Cooperstown (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
to defend this suit, if there was any valid defense to be made. This, of course, went very hard against us; and it was to no purpose that we informed him that Thomas McElrath, though legally implicated in it, had nothing to do practically with this matter—(all which he knew very well long before)—and that the other defendant is the man who does whatever libeling is done in the Tribune, and holds himself everywhere responsible for it. We presume there is not much doubt even so far off as Cooperstown as to who edits the Tribune, and who wrote the editorial about the Fonda business. (In point of fact, the real and palpable defendant in this suit never even conversed with his partner a quarter of an hour altogether about this subject, considering it entirely his own job; and the plaintiff himself, in conversation with Mr. McElrath, in the presence of his attorney, had fully exonerated Mr. M. from anything more than legal liability.) But Richard was on his legs as a lawyer—he pointed to<
Fonda (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ded the suit in person, and, on returning to New York, wrote a long and ludicrous account of the trial, which occupied eleven columns and a quarter in the Tribune of Dec. 12th. For that number of the paper there was such a demand, that the account of the trial was, soon after, re-published in a pamphlet, of which this chapter will be little more than a condensation. The libel—such as it was—the reader may find lurking in the following epistle: Mr. Fenimore Cooper and his libels. Fonda, Nov. 17, 1841. To the editor of the Tribune:— The Circuit Court now sitting here is to be occupied chiefly with the legal griefs of Mr. Fenimore Cooper, who has determined to avenge himself upon the Press for having contributed by its criticisms to his waning popularity as a novelist. The handsome Mr. Effingham has three cases of issue here, two of which are against Col. Webb, Editor of the Courier and Enquirer, and one against Mr. Weed, Editor of the Albany Evening Journal. <
Ballston (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
This suit was originally to have been tried at the May Circuit at Ballston; but neither Fenimore (who was then engaged in the Coopering of Come to attend to it—so it went over to this term, which opened at Ballston Spa on Monday, Dec. 5th. We arrived on the ground at eleven o'clock found time to read the papers pertaining to it till we arrived at Ballston. The delay in reaching the case gave us time for all; and thance, you see, any how. But to return to Richard's argument at Ballston. He put very strongly against us the fact that our Fonda correspoit will be remembered, chivalrously declared, in his summing up at Ballston, that if we were to sue him for a libel in asserting our personal s to walking, you don't expect a man of mark, as you called him at Ballston, to be quite as dapper and pert as a footman, whose walk is his hold be worth attending, Fenimore; and we'll warrant the jokes to average a good deal better than those you cracked in your speech at Ballston
Saratoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ial comes on this afternoon; his counsel, C. L. Jordan, Esq., having just arrived in the up train. Cooper will be blown sky high. This experiment upon the Editor of the Courier and Enquirer, I predict, will cure the handsome Mr. Effingham of his monomania for libels. The rest of the story shall be given here in Mr. Greeley's own words. He begins the narrative thus:— The responsible Editor of the Tribune returned yesterday morning from a week's journey to and sojourn in the County of Saratoga, having been thereto urgently persuaded by a Supreme Court writ, requiring him to answer to the declaration of Mr. J. Fenimore Cooper in an action for Libel. This suit was originally to have been tried at the May Circuit at Ballston; but neither Fenimore (who was then engaged in the Coopering of Col. Stone of the Commercial) nor we had time to attend to it—so it went over to this term, which opened at Ballston Spa on Monday, Dec. 5th. We arrived on the ground at eleven o'clock of
Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 18
une and J. Fenimore Cooper. The libel Horace Greeley's narrative of the trial he reviews the openinion he addresses the jury Mr. Cooper sums up Horace Greeley comments on the speech of the novelist in doing so he perpetrates New libels the verdict Mr. Greeley's remarks on the same strikes a bee—line for New YorkTribune for libel, that appealed so strongly to Horace Greeley's sense of the comic, that he seldom alluded tThe trial took place at Saratoga, Dec. 9th, 1842. Mr. Greeley defended the suit in person, and, on returning to The rest of the story shall be given here in Mr. Greeley's own words. He begins the narrative thus:— s argument. In his pleadings, he had set forth Horace Greeley and Thomas Mc-Elrath as Editors and Proprietors the case. Should you find, gentleman, concluded Mr. Greeley, that I had no right to express an opinion Gentlemen, I fearlessly await your decision! Mr. Greeley resumes his narrative: Mr. J. Fenimore Coop
E. G. Stone (search for this): chapter 18
n Mr. Greeley's own words. He begins the narrative thus:— The responsible Editor of the Tribune returned yesterday morning from a week's journey to and sojourn in the County of Saratoga, having been thereto urgently persuaded by a Supreme Court writ, requiring him to answer to the declaration of Mr. J. Fenimore Cooper in an action for Libel. This suit was originally to have been tried at the May Circuit at Ballston; but neither Fenimore (who was then engaged in the Coopering of Col. Stone of the Commercial) nor we had time to attend to it—so it went over to this term, which opened at Ballston Spa on Monday, Dec. 5th. We arrived on the ground at eleven o'clock of that day, and found the plaintiff and his lawyers ready for us, our case No. 10 on the calendar, and of course a good prospect of an early trial; but an important case involving Water-rights came in ahead of us (No. 8) taking two days, and it was half-past 10, A. M., of Friday, before ours was reached—very fortunat<
y, it would then be time to invent some steam-lightning balloon, and have a reporter ready on the spot the moment before any notable event should occur. This would do it; but now we luckless editors must too often depend on the observation and reports of those who are less observant, less careful, possibly in some cases less sagacious, than those of our own tribe. Our limitations are not unlike those of Mr. Weller, Junior, as stated while under cross-examination in the case of Bardell vs. Pickwick: Yes, I have a pair of eyes, replied Sam, and that's just it. If they was a pair of patent double million magnifyina gas microscopes of hextra power, p'raps I might be able to see through a flight of stairs and a deal door, but beina only eyes you see, my wision's limited. Fenimore proceeded to consider our defense, which he used up in five minutes, by pronouncing it no defence at all! It had nothing to do with the matter in issue whatever, and we must be very green if we meant
r of prophecy, it would then be time to invent some steam-lightning balloon, and have a reporter ready on the spot the moment before any notable event should occur. This would do it; but now we luckless editors must too often depend on the observation and reports of those who are less observant, less careful, possibly in some cases less sagacious, than those of our own tribe. Our limitations are not unlike those of Mr. Weller, Junior, as stated while under cross-examination in the case of Bardell vs. Pickwick: Yes, I have a pair of eyes, replied Sam, and that's just it. If they was a pair of patent double million magnifyina gas microscopes of hextra power, p'raps I might be able to see through a flight of stairs and a deal door, but beina only eyes you see, my wision's limited. Fenimore proceeded to consider our defense, which he used up in five minutes, by pronouncing it no defence at all! It had nothing to do with the matter in issue whatever, and we must be very gree
C. L. Jordan (search for this): chapter 18
om Judge Willard, and after remaining in their room till twelve o'clock at night, sealed a verdict for $400 for Mr. Effingham, which was delivered to the Court this morning. This meagre verdict, under the circumstances, is a severe and mortifying rebuke to Cooper, who had everything his own way. The value of Mr. Cooper's character, therefore, has been judicially ascertained. It is worth exactly four hundred dollars. Col. Webb's trial comes on this afternoon; his counsel, C. L. Jordan, Esq., having just arrived in the up train. Cooper will be blown sky high. This experiment upon the Editor of the Courier and Enquirer, I predict, will cure the handsome Mr. Effingham of his monomania for libels. The rest of the story shall be given here in Mr. Greeley's own words. He begins the narrative thus:— The responsible Editor of the Tribune returned yesterday morning from a week's journey to and sojourn in the County of Saratoga, having been thereto urgently persuade
1 2 3 4