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Plattsburg (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
een a heavy one, for the distance was accomplished in a little more than two days. The sleighing, however, was good, and the Connecticut river was crossed on the ice. The teamster remembers well the intelligent white-headed boy who was so pressing with his questions, as they rode along over the snow, and who soon exhausted the man's knowledge of the geography of the region in which he had lived all his days. He asked me, says he, a great dea. about Lake Champlain, and how far it was from Plattsburgh to this, that, and ta other place; but, Lord! he told me a d——d sight more than I could tell him. The passengers in the sleigh were Horace, his parents, his brother, and two sisters, and all arrived safely at the little house in Westhaven,—safely, but very, very poor. They possessed the clothes they wore on their journey, a bed or two, a few —very few—domestic utensils, an antique chest, and one or two other small relics of their former state; and they possessed nothing more. A l
Amherst, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
djoining town of Bedford, which he cultivated on shares, and devoted principally to the raising of hops. Misfortune still pursued him. His two years experience of hop-growing was not satisfactory. The hop-market was depressed. His own farm in Amherst was either ill managed or else the seasons were unfavorable. He gave up the hop-farm, poorer than ever. He removed back to his old home in Amherst. A little legal manoeuvring or rascality on the part of a creditor, gave the finishing blow toAmherst. A little legal manoeuvring or rascality on the part of a creditor, gave the finishing blow to his fortunes; and, in the winter of 1821, he gave up the effort to recover himself, became a bankrupt, was sold out of house, land, and household goods by the sheriff, and fled from the State to avoid arrest, leaving his family behind. Horace was nearly ten years old. Some of the debts then left unpaid, he discharged in part thirty years after. Mr. Greeley had to begin the world anew, and the world was all before him, where to choose, excepting only that portion of it which is included wit
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Chapter 4: his father ruined—removal to Vermont. New Hampshire before the era of manufactures causes of his father's failure rum in the olden time an execution in the house flight of the father Horace and the rum jug Compromise with the creditors removal to another farm final ruin removal to Vermont the winter journey poverty of the family scene at their New home cheerfulness in misfortune. But while thus Horace was growing up to meet his destiny, pressing forward onVermont the winter journey poverty of the family scene at their New home cheerfulness in misfortune. But while thus Horace was growing up to meet his destiny, pressing forward on the rural road to learning, and secreting character in that secluded home, a cloud, undiscerned by him, had come over his father's prospects. It began to gather when the boy was little more than six years old. In his seventh year it broke, and drove the family, for a time, from house and land. In his tenth, it had completed its work—his father was a ruined man, an exile, a fugitive from his native State. In those days, before the great manufacturing towns which now afford the farmer a mar
Horace (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n the partisan, like man the sectarian, is, always was, and will ever be, a poor creature. The way to thrive in New Hampshire was to work very hard, keep the store-bill small, stick to the farm, and be no man's security. Of these four things, Horace's father did only one—he worked hard. He was good workman, methodical, skillful, and persevering. But he speculated in lumber, and lost money by it. He was bound, as they say in the country, for another man, and had to pay the money which that thers assert, that the article carried off by the indignant boy was not dresses, but a gallon of rum. But whatever the boy did, or left undone, the reader may imagine that it was to all the family a day of confusion, anguish, and horror. Both of Horace's parents were persons of incorruptible honesty; they had striven hard to place such a calamity as this far from their house; they had never experienced themselves, nor witnessed at their earlier homes, a similar scene; the blow was unexpected; a
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
father ruined—removal to Vermont. New Hampshire before the era of manufactures causes of gulated the price of grain in the barns of New Hampshire by the standard of Mark Lane, a farmer of New Hampshire was not, in his best estate, very far from ruin. Some articles which forty years agoe manufacturing system was introduced into New Hampshire, affording employment to her daughters in the factory, to her sons on the land, New Hampshire was a poverty-stricken State. It is one of t, a poor creature. The way to thrive in New Hampshire was to work very hard, keep the store-billt with money, and money was hard to get in New Hampshire. Zaccheus Greeley was not the man to stinwhich is included within the boundaries of New Hampshire. He made his way, after some wandering, t sleigh and horses and go over with him to New Hampshire State, and bring his family back; and how,ough to secure him, and away they drove to New Hampshire State. One sleigh was sufficient to conve
Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d got a few miles on the way, he said to Zac, said he, that he (Zac) was a stranger to him, and he did n't feel like going so far without enough to secure him; and so Zac gave him enough to secure him, and away they drove to New Hampshire State. One sleigh was sufficient to convey all the little property the law had left the family, and the load could not have been a heavy one, for the distance was accomplished in a little more than two days. The sleighing, however, was good, and the Connecticut river was crossed on the ice. The teamster remembers well the intelligent white-headed boy who was so pressing with his questions, as they rode along over the snow, and who soon exhausted the man's knowledge of the geography of the region in which he had lived all his days. He asked me, says he, a great dea. about Lake Champlain, and how far it was from Plattsburgh to this, that, and ta other place; but, Lord! he told me a d——d sight more than I could tell him. The passengers in the sleig
Mark lane (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4
han six years old. In his seventh year it broke, and drove the family, for a time, from house and land. In his tenth, it had completed its work—his father was a ruined man, an exile, a fugitive from his native State. In those days, before the great manufacturing towns which now afford the farmer a market for his produce had sprung into existence along the shores of the Merrimac, before a net-work of railroads regulated the price of grain in the barns of New Hampshire by the standard of Mark Lane, a farmer of New Hampshire was not, in his best estate, very far from ruin. Some articles which forty years ago, were quite destitute of pecuniary value, now afford an ample profit. Fire-wood, for example, when Horace Greeley was a boy, could seldom be sold at any price. It was usually burned up on the land on which it grew, as a worthless incumbrance. Fire-wood now, in the city of Manchester, sells for six dollars a cord, and at any point within ten miles of Manchester for four dollar
Westhaven (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ere to choose, excepting only that portion of it which is included within the boundaries of New Hampshire. He made his way, after some wandering, to the town of Westhaven, in Rutland county, Vermont, about a hundred and twenty miles northwest of his former residence. There he found a large landed proprietor, who had made one fortune in Boston as a merchant, and married another in Westhaven, the latter consisting of an extensive tract of land. He had now retired from business, had set up for a country gentleman, was clearing his lands, and when they were cleared he rented them out in farms. This attempt to found an estate, in the European style, signally t more than I could tell him. The passengers in the sleigh were Horace, his parents, his brother, and two sisters, and all arrived safely at the little house in Westhaven,—safely, but very, very poor. They possessed the clothes they wore on their journey, a bed or two, a few —very few—domestic utensils, an antique chest, and one <
Rutland County (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t of house, land, and household goods by the sheriff, and fled from the State to avoid arrest, leaving his family behind. Horace was nearly ten years old. Some of the debts then left unpaid, he discharged in part thirty years after. Mr. Greeley had to begin the world anew, and the world was all before him, where to choose, excepting only that portion of it which is included within the boundaries of New Hampshire. He made his way, after some wandering, to the town of Westhaven, in Rutland county, Vermont, about a hundred and twenty miles northwest of his former residence. There he found a large landed proprietor, who had made one fortune in Boston as a merchant, and married another in Westhaven, the latter consisting of an extensive tract of land. He had now retired from business, had set up for a country gentleman, was clearing his lands, and when they were cleared he rented them out in farms. This attempt to found an estate, in the European style, signally failed. The mansion
Bedford (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
is far from their house; they had never experienced themselves, nor witnessed at their earlier homes, a similar scene; the blow was unexpected; and mingled with their sense of shame at being publicly degraded, was a feeling of honest rage at the supposed injustice of so summary a proceeding. It was a dark day; but it passed, as the darkest day will. An arrangement was made with the creditors. Mr. Greeley gave up his own farm, temporarily, and removed to another in the adjoining town of Bedford, which he cultivated on shares, and devoted principally to the raising of hops. Misfortune still pursued him. His two years experience of hop-growing was not satisfactory. The hop-market was depressed. His own farm in Amherst was either ill managed or else the seasons were unfavorable. He gave up the hop-farm, poorer than ever. He removed back to his old home in Amherst. A little legal manoeuvring or rascality on the part of a creditor, gave the finishing blow to his fortunes; and, i
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