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Chatham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
s had I been led blindfold into a Comedy (or rather tragedy) of Errors. Your unfortunate, Timothy Wiggins. His connection with the office of a sporting paper procured him occasionally an order for admission to a theatre, which he used. He appeared to have had a natural liking for the drama; all intelligent persons have when they are young; and one of his companions of that day remembers well the intense interest with which he once witnessed the performance of Richard III., at the old Chatham theatre. At the close of the play, he said there was another of Shakespeare's tragedies which he had long wished to see, and that was Hamlet. Soon after writing his letter, the luckless Wiggins, tempted by the prospect of better wages, left the Spirit of the Times, and went back to West's, and worked for some weeks on Prof. Bush's Notes on Genesis, the worst manuscript ever seen in a printing-office. That finished, he returned to the Spirit of the Times, and remained till October, whe
Londonderry, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
edies which he had long wished to see, and that was Hamlet. Soon after writing his letter, the luckless Wiggins, tempted by the prospect of better wages, left the Spirit of the Times, and went back to West's, and worked for some weeks on Prof. Bush's Notes on Genesis, the worst manuscript ever seen in a printing-office. That finished, he returned to the Spirit of the Times, and remained till October, when he went to visit his relatives in New Hampshire. He reached his uncle's farm in Londonderry in the apple-gathering season, and going at once to the orchard found his cousins engaged in that pleasing exercise. Horace jumped over the fence, saluted them in the hearty and unornamental Scotch-Irish style, sprang into a tree, and assisted them till their task for the day was done, and then all the party went frolicking into the woods on a grape-hunt. Horace was a welcome guest. He was full of fun in those days, and kept the boys roaring with his stories, or agape with descriptions
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e said there was another of Shakespeare's tragedies which he had long wished to see, and that was Hamlet. Soon after writing his letter, the luckless Wiggins, tempted by the prospect of better wages, left the Spirit of the Times, and went back to West's, and worked for some weeks on Prof. Bush's Notes on Genesis, the worst manuscript ever seen in a printing-office. That finished, he returned to the Spirit of the Times, and remained till October, when he went to visit his relatives in New Hampshire. He reached his uncle's farm in Londonderry in the apple-gathering season, and going at once to the orchard found his cousins engaged in that pleasing exercise. Horace jumped over the fence, saluted them in the hearty and unornamental Scotch-Irish style, sprang into a tree, and assisted them till their task for the day was done, and then all the party went frolicking into the woods on a grape-hunt. Horace was a welcome guest. He was full of fun in those days, and kept the boys roarin
Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 9
ma Timothy Wiggins works for Mr. Redfield the first lift. Horace Greeley was a journeyman printer in this city for fourteen months. Thosnting-office for the purpose of speaking to the man whose place Horace Greeley had taken. Where's Jones? asked Mr. Leggett. He's gone adfield favors me with the following note of his connection with Horace Greeley:—My recollections of Mr. Greeley extend from about the time he Mr. Greeley extend from about the time he first came to the city to work as a compositor. I was carrying on the stereotyping business in William street, and having occasion one day for more compositors, one of the hands brought in Greeley, remarking sotto voce as he introduced him, that he was a boyish and rather odd lookat he was a good workman. Being much in want of help at the time, Greeley was set to work, and I was not a little surprised to find on Sature in his life, which taken at the flood leads on to fortune. Horace Greeley's First Lift happened to take place in connection with an event
J. S. Redfield (search for this): chapter 9
spirit of the Times specimen of his writing at this period naturally fond of the drama Timothy Wiggins works for Mr. Redfield the first lift. Horace Greeley was a journeyman printer in this city for fourteen months. Those months need not de again early in November, in time and on purpose to vote at the fall elections. He went to work, soon after, for Mr. J. S. Redfield, now an eminent publisher of this city, then a stereotyper. Mr. Redfield favors me with the following note of his Mr. Redfield favors me with the following note of his connection with Horace Greeley:—My recollections of Mr. Greeley extend from about the time he first came to the city to work as a compositor. I was carrying on the stereotyping business in William street, and having occasion one day for more composie New York Tribune, were the distinguishing features of his character as a journeyman. He remained in the office of Mr. Redfield till late in December, when the circumstance occurred which gave him his first Lift in the world. There is a tide, it
Timothy Wiggins (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: from office to office. Leaves West's works on the evening Post story of Mr. Leggett— Commercial advertiser — spirit of the Times specimen of his writing at this period naturally fond of the drama Timothy Wiggins works for Mr. Redfield the first lift. Horace Greeley was a journeyman printer in this city for fourteen months. Those months need not detain us long from the more eventful periods of his life. He worked for Mr. West in Chatham street till about tho doing; and another family had immediately taken his place; of which changes, my absence of mind and absence from dinner had kept me ignorant; and thus had I been led blindfold into a Comedy (or rather tragedy) of Errors. Your unfortunate, Timothy Wiggins. His connection with the office of a sporting paper procured him occasionally an order for admission to a theatre, which he used. He appeared to have had a natural liking for the drama; all intelligent persons have when they are young;
hey are young; and one of his companions of that day remembers well the intense interest with which he once witnessed the performance of Richard III., at the old Chatham theatre. At the close of the play, he said there was another of Shakespeare's tragedies which he had long wished to see, and that was Hamlet. Soon after writing his letter, the luckless Wiggins, tempted by the prospect of better wages, left the Spirit of the Times, and went back to West's, and worked for some weeks on Prof. Bush's Notes on Genesis, the worst manuscript ever seen in a printing-office. That finished, he returned to the Spirit of the Times, and remained till October, when he went to visit his relatives in New Hampshire. He reached his uncle's farm in Londonderry in the apple-gathering season, and going at once to the orchard found his cousins engaged in that pleasing exercise. Horace jumped over the fence, saluted them in the hearty and unornamental Scotch-Irish style, sprang into a tree, and assi
Shakespeare (search for this): chapter 9
r unfortunate, Timothy Wiggins. His connection with the office of a sporting paper procured him occasionally an order for admission to a theatre, which he used. He appeared to have had a natural liking for the drama; all intelligent persons have when they are young; and one of his companions of that day remembers well the intense interest with which he once witnessed the performance of Richard III., at the old Chatham theatre. At the close of the play, he said there was another of Shakespeare's tragedies which he had long wished to see, and that was Hamlet. Soon after writing his letter, the luckless Wiggins, tempted by the prospect of better wages, left the Spirit of the Times, and went back to West's, and worked for some weeks on Prof. Bush's Notes on Genesis, the worst manuscript ever seen in a printing-office. That finished, he returned to the Spirit of the Times, and remained till October, when he went to visit his relatives in New Hampshire. He reached his uncle's f
William T. Porter (search for this): chapter 9
go, on the first of January last—that being a holiday, and the writer being then a stranger with few social greetings to exchange in New York—he inquired his way into the ill-furnished, chilly, forlorn-looking attic printing-office in which William T. Porter, in company with another very young man, who soon after abandoned the enterprise, had just issued the Spirit of the Times, the first weekly journal devoted entirely to sporting intelligence ever attempted in this country. It was a moderate them possessed a persevering spirit and an ardent enthusiasm for the pursuit to which he had devoted himself. And, consequently, the Spirit of the Times still exists and flourishes, under the proprietorship of its originator and founder, Colonel Porter. For this paper, our hero, during his short stay in the office, composed a multitude of articles and paragraphs, most of them short and unimportant. As a specimen of his style at this period, I copy from the Spirit of May 5th, 1832, the fol
hapter 9: from office to office. Leaves West's works on the evening Post story of Mr. Leggett— Commercial advertiser — spirit of the Times specimen of his writing at this period naturlace in the office of the Evening Post, whence, it is said, he was soon dismissed by the late Mr. Leggett, on the ground of his sorry appearance. The story current among printers is this: Mr. LeggetMr. Leggett came into the printing-office for the purpose of speaking to the man whose place Horace Greeley had taken. Where's Jones? asked Mr. Leggett. He's gone away, replied one of the men. Who haMr. Leggett. He's gone away, replied one of the men. Who has taken his place, then? said the irritable editor. There's the man, said some one, pointing to Horace, who was bobbing at the case in his peculiar way. Mr. Leggett looked at the man, and saidMr. Leggett looked at the man, and said to the foreman, For God's sake discharge him, and let's have decent-looking men in the office, at least. Horace was accordingly—so goes the story—discharged at the end of the week. He worked,
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