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Lawton's Valley (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
me.... God keep me from falling away from my purpose, to do only what seems to me necessary and called for in my vocation, and not to produce for money, praise, or amusement. Was melancholy and Godless all day, having taken my volume of Kant back to the Athenaeum for the yearly rearrangement. Could not interest myself in anything.... Visited old Mrs. Sumner, The mother of Charles Sumner. whose chariot and horses are nearly ready. At this time there was some question of selling Lawton's Valley for economic reasons. The exigency passed, but the following words show the depth of her feeling on the subject: If I have any true philosophy, any sincere religion, these must support me under the privation of the Valley. I feel this, and resolve to do well, but nature will suffer. That place has been my confidante,--my bosom friend,--intimate to me as no human being ever will be — dear and comforting also to my children.... June 11 ....Thought of a good text for a sermon, In th
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e under the privation of the Valley. I feel this, and resolve to do well, but nature will suffer. That place has been my confidante,--my bosom friend,--intimate to me as no human being ever will be — dear and comforting also to my children.... June 11 ....Thought of a good text for a sermon, In the world ye shall have tribulation, the scope being to show that our tribulation, if we try to do well, is in the world, our refuge and comfort in the church. Thought of starting a society in Newport for the practice of sacred music, availing ourselves of the summer musicians and the possible aid of such ladies as Miss Reed, etc., for solos. Such an enterprise would be humanizing, and would supply a better object than the empty reunions of fashion .... Wednesday, June 21. Attended the meeting at Faneuil Hall, for the consideration of reconstruction of the Southern States. Dana made a statement to the effect that voting was a civic, not a natural, right, and built up the propriety o
Barnstable, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s ... The Sunday's devotion without the week's thought and use is a spire without a meeting-house. It leaps upward, but crowns and covers nothing. I have too often set down the moral weight I have to carry, and frisked around it. But the voice now tells me that I must bear it to the end, or lose it forever. The move to Boylston Place was in November. Early in the month a frisking took place, with amusing results. Our mother went with Governor and Mrs. Andrew and a gay party to Barnstable for the annual festival and ball. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company acted as escort, and — according to custom — the band of the Company furnished the music. For some reason — the townspeople thought because the pretty girls were all engaged beforehand for the dance — the officer in command stopped the music at twelve o'clock, to the great distress of the Barnstable people who had ordered their carriages at two or later. The party broke up in disorder far from admired, and o
Westborough (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
again:-- Nearly disabled by headaches.... Determine to push on with my volume. Almost distracted with work of various sorts — my book — the new house — this one full of company, and a small party in the evening. All these days much hurried by proofs. Went in the evening to the opening of the new wards in the Women's Hospital — read two short poems, according to promise. These were kindly received. . .. The next day she went with a party of friends to the Boys' Reform School at Westboro. In the yard where the boys were collected, the guests were introduced. Quite a number crowded to see the Author of the Battle Hymn. Two or three said to me: Are you the woman that wrote that Battle Hymn? When I told them that I was, they seemed much pleased. This I felt to be a great honor. The next day again she is harassed with correcting proofs and furnishing copy. Ran to Bartol for a little help, which he gave me. The Reverend C. A. Bartol was our next-door neighbor in Ch
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ugh.... ... My peace I give unto you is a wonderful saying. What peace have most of us to give each other? But Christ has given peace to the world, peace at least as an ideal object, to be ever sought, though never fully attained. September 10.... Read Kant on state rights. According to him, wars of conquest are allowable only in a state of nature, not in a state of peace (which is not to be attained without a compact whose necessity is supreme and whose obligations are sacred). So Napoleon's crusade against the constituted authority of the European republic was without logical justification,--which accounts for the speedy downfall of his empire. What he accomplished had only the subjective justification of his genius and his ambition. His work was of great indirect use in sweeping away certain barriers of usage and of superstition. He drew a picture of government on a large scale and thus set a pattern which inevitably enlarged the procedures of his successors, who lost t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson (search for this): chapter 10
lf again, reading Kant and Livy, teaching the children, and gathering mussels on the beach. She flits up to town to see the new statue of Horace Mann, in order to criticise it for Chev's pamphlet ; Dr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of company tumbled in upon us, to wit, Colonel Higginson and Mrs. McKay, the Tweedys and John Field, and the Gulstons. All were friendly. Only on my speaking of the rudeness occasionally shown me by a certain lady, Mrs. Tweedy said: But that was in the presence of your superiors, was it not? I replied: I do not know that I was ever in Mrs. X.'s company under those circumstances! After which we all laughed. She was at this time sitting to Miss Margaret Foley for a portrait medallion and was writing philosophy and poetry. Family and ho
John Wakefield Francis (search for this): chapter 10
d world at large. The tortoise in the end overtook the hare, and slow, plodding Justice, with her loyal hack, distanced splendid Ambition mounted on first-rate ability, once and forever.... To Zion church, to hear preach. Text, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things. Sermon as far removed from it as possible, weak, sentimental, and illiterate. He left out the d in receivedst, and committed other errors in pronunciation. But to sit with the two aunts Mrs. Francis and Mrs. McAllister. in the old church, so familiar to my childhood, was touching and impressive. Hither my father was careful to bring us. Imperfect as his doctrine now appears to me, he looks down upon me from the height of a better life than mine, and still appears to me as my superior. A little nervous about my reading. Reached Mrs. [Richard] Hunt's at twelve. Saw the sweet little boy. Mrs. Hunt very kind and cordial. At one Mr. Hunt led me to the studio which I found well fill
Villa Julia (search for this): chapter 10
twofold poignancy. She went through life in double harness, thought and feeling abreast; though often torn between the two, in the main she gave free rein to both, trusting the issue to God. The winter of 1864-65 was an arduous one. She was writing new philosophical essays, and reading them before various circles of friends. The larger audience which she craved was not for the moment attainable. She was studying deeply, reading Latin by way of relaxation, going somewhat into society (Julia and Florence being now of the dancing age), and entertaining a good deal in a quiet way. In February she writes: Much tormented by interruptions. Could not get five quiet minutes at a time. Everybody torments me with every smallest errand. And I am trying to study philosophy! Probably we were troublesome children and made more noise than we should. Her accurate ear for music was often a source of distress to her, as one of us can witness, an indolent child who neglected her practising
onfidante,--my bosom friend,--intimate to me as no human being ever will be — dear and comforting also to my children.... June 11 ....Thought of a good text for a sermon, In the world ye shall have tribulation, the scope being to show that our tribulation, if we try to do well, is in the world, our refuge and comfort in the church. Thought of starting a society in Newport for the practice of sacred music, availing ourselves of the summer musicians and the possible aid of such ladies as Miss Reed, etc., for solos. Such an enterprise would be humanizing, and would supply a better object than the empty reunions of fashion .... Wednesday, June 21. Attended the meeting at Faneuil Hall, for the consideration of reconstruction of the Southern States. Dana made a statement to the effect that voting was a civic, not a natural, right, and built up the propriety of negro suffrage on the basis first of military right, then of duty to the negro, this being the only mode of enabling him to
J. Wilkes Booth (search for this): chapter 10
o, Thanks be to God! We all call it the greatest day of our lives. Apples, half-peck, .50. That week was one of joy and thankfulness for all. Thursday was Fast Day; she went to church to fatigue Satan. Afterwards made a visit to Mrs. who did not seem to have tired her devil out. The joy bells were soon to be silenced. Saturday, April 15, was A black day in history, though outwardly most fair. President Lincoln was assassinated in his box at the theatre, last evening, by J. Wilkes Booth. This atrocious act, which was consummated in a very theatrical manner, is enough to ruin not the Booth family alone, but the theatrical profession. Since my Sammy's death, nothing has happened that has given me so much personal pain as this event. The city is paralyzed. But we can only work on, and trust in God. Our father's face of tragedy, the anguish in his voice, as he called us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our yout
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