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t Corfu a Turkish pacha came on board with his harem, to our lively interest. The Journal gives every observable detail of the somewhat squalid manage, from the pacha's lilac trousers down to the dress of his son and heir, a singularly dirty baby. She remarks that An Irish servant's child in Boston, got up for Sunday, looks far cleaner and better. The pacha looked indolent and good-natured, and sent coffee to her before she disembarked at Syra. Here she was met by Mr. Evangelides, the Christy of her childhood, the Greek boy befriended by her father. He was now a prosperous man in middle life, full of affectionate remembrance of the family at 16 Bond Street, and of gratitude to dear Mr. Ward. He welcomed her most cordially, and introduced her not only to the beauties of Syra, but to its principal inhabitants, the governor of the Cyclades, the archbishop, and Doctor Hahn, the scientist and antiquary. She conversed with the archbishop in German. He deplored the absence of a s
John Kenyon (search for this): chapter 12
thout state of any kind, save my pleasant relations and my good position in my own country. Mrs. Benzon asked me to come alone to dinner in the evening. First, however, I called upon Arthur Mills at Hyde Park Gardens; then upon Mrs. Ambassadress Adams, who was quite cordial; then in frantic hurry home to dress. At Benzon's I met Robert Browning, a dear and sacred personage, dear for his own and his wife's sake. He sat next me at table and by and by spoke very kindly of my foolish verses Kenyon's Legacy, printed in Later Lyrics. about himself and E. B. B. I mean he spoke of them with magnanimity. Of course my present self would not publish, nor I hope write, anything of the kind, but I launched the arrow in the easy petulance of those days, more occupied with its force and polish than with its direction. To Lady Stanley's 5 o'clock tea, where I met her daughter Lady Amberley and Sir Samuel Baker, the explorer of the sources of the Nile. Dined with the Benzons, meeting Browning
F. P. G. Guizot (search for this): chapter 12
hich, indeed, we constantly fail, and yet in seeking it are constantly renewed.... Studios of Mozier and of Rogers-the former quite full. Both have considerable skill, neither has genius. The statues of Miss Hosmer are marble silences — they have nothing to say. Greece was before her. On June 17 the Journal says: Acroceraunian mountains, shore of Albania. Nothing strikes me — I have been struck till I am stricken down. Sirocco and head wind — vessel laboring with the sea, I with Guizot's Meditations, which also have some head wind in them. They seem to me inconclusive in statement and commonplace in thought, yet presenting some facts of interest. A little before 2 P. M. we passed Fano, the island on which Calypso could not console herself, and no wonder. At 2 we enter the channel of Corfii. At Corfu a Turkish pacha came on board with his harem, to our lively interest. The Journal gives every observable detail of the somewhat squalid manage, from the pacha's lilac tr<
Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 12
rayers, Hope of the world, in grief and wrong! Be thine the blessing of the years, The gift of faith, the crown of song. J. W. H. In January, 1867, a new note is sounded. In the evening attended meeting in behalf of Crete, at which Chev presided and spoke. Excellent as to matter, but always with a defective elocution, not sending his voice out. He was much and deservedly glorified by other speakers, and, indeed, his appearance on this occasion was most touching and interesting. Phillips was very fine; Huntington was careful, polished, and interesting. Andrew read the resolutions, with a splendid compliment to Chev. Some months before this, in August, 1866, the Cretans had risen against their Turkish oppressors, and made a valiant struggle for freedom. From the first the Doctor had been deeply interested in the insurrection: now, as reports came of the sufferings of the brave mountaineers, and of their women and children, who had been sent to the mainland for safety, h
T. B. Aldrich (search for this): chapter 12
again for Greece on an errand of mercy. The Journal gives an outline of the busy winter:-- The post is the poor man's valet.... January 12. A busy and studious day; had the neighbors in after tea. Want clamors for relief, but calls for cure, which begins in discipline .... January 24. N. P. Willis's funeral. Chev came home quite suddenly and asked me to go with him to the church, St. Paul's. The pallbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for some of these failures. My tea party was delightful, friendly, not fashionable. We had a good talk, and a lovely, familiar time. Heard J. F. C. Took my dear Francesco [Marion Crawford] at his
Harriet G. Hosmer (search for this): chapter 12
ness and which promote the good of all — this even as an ideal is a great gain from the small and eager covetousness of personal desires. Religion gives this steadfast standard whose pursuit is happiness. Therefore let him who seeks religion be glad that he seeks the only true good of which, indeed, we constantly fail, and yet in seeking it are constantly renewed.... Studios of Mozier and of Rogers-the former quite full. Both have considerable skill, neither has genius. The statues of Miss Hosmer are marble silences — they have nothing to say. Greece was before her. On June 17 the Journal says: Acroceraunian mountains, shore of Albania. Nothing strikes me — I have been struck till I am stricken down. Sirocco and head wind — vessel laboring with the sea, I with Guizot's Meditations, which also have some head wind in them. They seem to me inconclusive in statement and commonplace in thought, yet presenting some facts of interest. A little before 2 P. M. we passed Fano,
Harrington (search for this): chapter 12
proximo. So we have the note of preparation, and the prospect of change and separation makes us feel how happy we have been, in passing this whole winter together. The remaining days were full of work of every kind. She gave readings here and there in aid of the Cretans. Ran about much: saw Miss Rogers's deaf pupils at Mrs. Lamson's, very interesting.... For the first time in three days got a peep at Fichte. Finished Jesse's George the third. Went to Roxbury to read at Mrs. Harrington's for the benefit of the Cretans. It was a literary and musical entertainment. Tickets, one dollar. We made one hundred dollars. My poems were very kindly received. Afterwards, in great haste, to Sophia Whitwell's, This was evidently a meeting of the Brain Club. where I received a great ovation, all members greeting me most affectionately. Presently Mr. [Josiah] Quincy, with some very pleasant and complimentary remarks on Dr. Howe and myself, introduced Mrs. Silsbee's farewell
Charles Felu (search for this): chapter 12
with heathen triviality. That moment showed me what a picture can do. I hope I shall remember it, though I do plead guilty of late to an extraordinary desire for finery of all sorts. It is as if I were going home to play the part of Princess in some great drama, which is not at all likely to be the case. Yet the same day she went to the beguinage and bought Flossy's wedding hdkf, 22 frc— lace scarf, 3 fr., piece of edging, 4 fr. Among the notabilities of Antwerp in those days was Charles Felu, the armless painter. He was to be seen every day in the Museum, copying the great masters with skill and fidelity. He interested the Doctor greatly, and the whole party made acquaintance with him. A letter from one of them describes the meeting with this singular man:-- As we were looking round at the pictures, I noticed a curious painting arrangement. There was a platform raised about a foot above the floor, with two stools, one in front of the other, and an easel. Presently the
... January 24. N. P. Willis's funeral. Chev came home quite suddenly and asked me to go with him to the church, St. Paul's. The pallbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for some of these failures. My tea party was delightful, friendly, not fashionable. We had a good talk, and a lovely, familiar time. Heard J. F. C. Took my dear Francesco [Marion Crawford] at his request, with great pleasure, feeling that he would find there a living Jesus immortal in influence, instead of the perfumed and embalmed mummy of orthodoxy.... Of that which is not clear one cannot have a clear idea. My reading in Fichte to-day is of the most confused.
y chronicled in the Journal and more fully in From the Oak to the Olive. Solid fact as the performance of the functions remains, for us it assumes a forcible unreality, through the impeding intervention of black dresses and veils, with what should be women under them. But as these creatures push like battering-rams, and caper like hegoats, we shall prefer to adjourn the question of their humanity, and to give it the benefit of a doubt. We must except, however, our countrywomen from dear Boston, who were not seen otherwise than decently and in order. A vivid description follows of the ceremonies of Good Friday and Easter Sunday, ending with the illumination of St. Peter's. A magical and unique spectacle it certainly is, with the well-known change from the paper lanterns to the flaring lampions. Costly is it of human labor, and perilous to human life. And when I remembered that those employed in it receive the sacrament beforehand, in order that imminent death may not find th
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