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Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 12
fact that a high price was set on his head) and the various colonies of refugees, the Doctor felt that further aid must be obtained. Accordingly, the journeyings of the little party after leaving Greece were for the most part only less hurried than the earlier ones, the exception being a week of enchantment spent in Venice, awaiting the Doctor, who had been called back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her journeyings in those days; indeed, until age and weariness came upon her, she never failed to have some piece of work on hand. When her ey
Munich (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 12
n spite — perhaps partly because — of the fact that a high price was set on his head) and the various colonies of refugees, the Doctor felt that further aid must be obtained. Accordingly, the journeyings of the little party after leaving Greece were for the most part only less hurried than the earlier ones, the exception being a week of enchantment spent in Venice, awaiting the Doctor, who had been called back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her journeyings in those days; indeed, until age and weariness came upon her, she never failed to have
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e archbishop in German. He deplored the absence of a state religion in America. I told him that the progress of religion in our country seemed to establish the fact that society attains the best religious culture through the greatest religious liberty. He replied that the members should all be united under one head. Yes, said I, but the Head is invisible ; and he repeated after me, Indeed, the Head is invisible. I will here remark that nothing could have been more refreshing to the New England mind than this immediate introduction to the theological opinions of the East. A few hours later his Grace returned the visit, seeking in his turn, it would appear, the refreshment of a new point of view. We resumed our conversation of the morning, and the celibacy of the clerical hierarchy came next in order in our discussion. The father was in something of a strait between the Christian dignification of marriage and its ascetic depreciation. The arrival of other visitors forced
Bruges (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 12
the palette in one foot and the brush in the other, and begin to paint. The nicety with which he picked out his brushes, rubbed the paints, erased with his great toe, etc., was a mystery to me. ... In a few minutes he put his foot into his pocket, drew out a paper from which he took his card, andfooted it politely to papa.... He shaves himself, plays billiards (and well, too), cards, and dominoes, cuts up his meat and feeds himself, etc. October 1. By accident went to the same hotel [in Bruges] to which I went twenty-four years ago, a bride. I recognized a staircase with a balustrade of swans each holding a stiff bulrush in its mouth.... Made a little verse thereupon. From Belgium the way led to London; thence, after a brief and delightful visit to the Bracebridges at Atherstone, to Liverpool, where the China awaited her passengers. The voyage was long and stormy, thirteen days: the Journal speaks chiefly of its discomforts; but on the second Sunday we read: X. preached a hor
St. Peter (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ome large and stately manceuvre, indicating their possession of all this space. It was Holy Week when they arrived in Rome, and she was anxious that the neophytes should see as much as possible of its impressive ceremonies. She took them to St. Peter's to see the washing of the pilgrims' feet by noble Roman ladies, and to hear the Miserere in the Sistine Chapel. These functions are briefly chronicled in the Journal and more fully in From the Oak to the Olive. Solid fact as the performan of a doubt. We must except, however, our countrywomen from dear Boston, who were not seen otherwise than decently and in order. A vivid description follows of the ceremonies of Good Friday and Easter Sunday, ending with the illumination of St. Peter's. A magical and unique spectacle it certainly is, with the well-known change from the paper lanterns to the flaring lampions. Costly is it of human labor, and perilous to human life. And when I remembered that those employed in it receive
Verona (Italy) (search for this): chapter 12
er visiting Crete (in spite — perhaps partly because — of the fact that a high price was set on his head) and the various colonies of refugees, the Doctor felt that further aid must be obtained. Accordingly, the journeyings of the little party after leaving Greece were for the most part only less hurried than the earlier ones, the exception being a week of enchantment spent in Venice, awaiting the Doctor, who had been called back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her journeyings in those days; indeed, until age and weariness came upon her, she n
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
he little party after leaving Greece were for the most part only less hurried than the earlier ones, the exception being a week of enchantment spent in Venice, awaiting the Doctor, who had been called back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her journeyings in those days; indeed, until age and weariness came upon her, she never failed to have some piece of work on hand. When her eyes could no longer compass cross-stitch embroidery, she amused herself with knitting, or with hooking small rugs. Her sketchbook was another resource while travelling
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
which sails on the 13th proximo. So we have the note of preparation, and the prospect of change and separation makes us feel how happy we have been, in passing this whole winter together. The remaining days were full of work of every kind. She gave readings here and there in aid of the Cretans. Ran about much: saw Miss Rogers's deaf pupils at Mrs. Lamson's, very interesting.... For the first time in three days got a peep at Fichte. Finished Jesse's George the third. Went to Roxbury to read at Mrs. Harrington's for the benefit of the Cretans. It was a literary and musical entertainment. Tickets, one dollar. We made one hundred dollars. My poems were very kindly received. Afterwards, in great haste, to Sophia Whitwell's, This was evidently a meeting of the Brain Club. where I received a great ovation, all members greeting me most affectionately. Presently Mr. [Josiah] Quincy, with some very pleasant and complimentary remarks on Dr. Howe and myself, introduced M
Atherstone (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
d, andfooted it politely to papa.... He shaves himself, plays billiards (and well, too), cards, and dominoes, cuts up his meat and feeds himself, etc. October 1. By accident went to the same hotel [in Bruges] to which I went twenty-four years ago, a bride. I recognized a staircase with a balustrade of swans each holding a stiff bulrush in its mouth.... Made a little verse thereupon. From Belgium the way led to London; thence, after a brief and delightful visit to the Bracebridges at Atherstone, to Liverpool, where the China awaited her passengers. The voyage was long and stormy, thirteen days: the Journal speaks chiefly of its discomforts; but on the second Sunday we read: X. preached a horrible sermon — stood up and mocked at philosophy in good English and bad Christianity. He failed alike of satire and of sense, and talked like a small Pharisee of two thousand years ago. Not much like the Sermon on the Mount, quoth I; not theology enough to stand examination at Andover. Bl
Hermoupolis (Greece) (search for this): chapter 12
ss of his son and heir, a singularly dirty baby. She remarks that An Irish servant's child in Boston, got up for Sunday, looks far cleaner and better. The pacha looked indolent and good-natured, and sent coffee to her before she disembarked at Syra. Here she was met by Mr. Evangelides, the Christy of her childhood, the Greek boy befriended by her father. He was now a prosperous man in middle life, full of affectionate remembrance of the family at 16 Bond Street, and of gratitude to dear Mr. Ward. He welcomed her most cordially, and introduced her not only to the beauties of Syra, but to its principal inhabitants, the governor of the Cyclades, the archbishop, and Doctor Hahn, the scientist and antiquary. She conversed with the archbishop in German. He deplored the absence of a state religion in America. I told him that the progress of religion in our country seemed to establish the fact that society attains the best religious culture through the greatest religious liberty.
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