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Israel Zangwill (search for this): chapter 30
.... The next day came an entertainment in aid of Atlanta University and Calhoun School; she enjoyed this exceedingly, especially the plantation songs, which are of profoundest pathos, mixed with overpowering humor. It was pleasant, too, to see the audience in which descendants of the old anti-slavery folk formed quite a feature. I had worked hard at the screed which was, I think, good. Heard interesting reports of mission work in our entire South. At the Authors' Club she met Israel Zangwill, who was rather indifferent when introduced to her. She thought he probably knew nothing about her, and adds,-- It is good perhaps to be taken down, now and then. In March she attended a hearing in connection with the School Board. The chair most courteously invited me to speak, saying, There is here a venerable lady who will hardly be likely to come here again for the present discussion, so I shall give her the remaining time. Whereupon I leaped into the arena and said my say.
William Butler Yeats (search for this): chapter 30
h: He owes them immortality. November 16. Dear Auntie Francis's wedding day. I think it was in 1828. My sisters and I were bridesmaids, my brothers groomsmen. Dear father, very lame, walked up with a cane to give her away. Grandma Cutler looked much discontented with the match. Father sent the pair off in his own carriage, with four horses, their manes and tails braided with white ribbons. They drove part of the way to Philadelphia. November 28.... To Wellesley College.... William Butler Yeats lectured on the revival of letters in Ireland. We dined with him afterwards at Miss Hazard's house. He is a man of fiery temperament, with a slight, boyish figure: has deep-set blue eyes and dark hair; reminds me of John O'Sullivan Hawthorne's friend of the Democratic Review. in his temperament; is certainly, as Grandpa Ward said of the Red Revolutionists, with whom he dined in the days of the French Revolution, very warm. November 29 .... This came into my mind, apropos of
Helen Wilman (search for this): chapter 30
long letter, to the effect desired. God grant that it may have some result! July 17. I despaired of being able to write a poem as requested for the Kansas semi-centennial celebration in October, but one line came to me: Sing us a song of the grand old time and the rest followed .. . This poem is printed in At Sunset. July 21. Writ ... to Mrs. Martha J. Hosmer, of Rock Point, Oregon, who wrote me a kindly meant letter, exhorting me to seek the truth and live, and to write to a Mrs. Helen Wilman, eighty-five years old and the possessor of some wonderful knowledge which will help me to renew my youth.... September 25. I could not go to church to-day, fearing to increase my cold, and not wishing to leave my dear family, so rarely united now. Have been reading Abbe Loisy's Autour d'un petit Livre, which is an apologetic vindication of his work LaEvangile et laEglise, which has been put upon the Index [Expurgatorius]. I feel sensibly all differences between his apologetic wob
Sarah Whitman (search for this): chapter 30
said: Go and say that! ... April 1.... A telegram announced the birth of my first great-grandchild, Harry Hall's infant daughter Julia Ward Howe Hall.. . . April 11. To Mrs. Bigelow Lawrence's, Parker House, to hear music. Mrs. [Henry] Whitman called for me. Delightful music; two quartettes of Beethoven's, a quintette of Mozart's, which I heard at Joseph Coolidge's some thirty or more years ago. I recognized it by the first movement, which Bellini borrowed in a sextette which I stuot been allowed to go to Quincy. It was more important that I should comfort for a moment the bruised heart of my dear friend than that I should be a guest at the Quincy Commencement. June 29. Heard to my sorrow of the death of delightful Sarah Whitman. Wrote a little screed for Woman's Journal which I sent... . In early July, she went to Concord for a memorial meeting in honor of Nathaniel Hawthorne. July 11. .... Alice Blackwell, some days ago, wrote beseeching me to write to Presi
Fitzhugh Whitehouse (search for this): chapter 30
youth.... September 25. I could not go to church to-day, fearing to increase my cold, and not wishing to leave my dear family, so rarely united now. Have been reading Abbe Loisy's Autour d'un petit Livre, which is an apologetic vindication of his work LaEvangile et laEglise, which has been put upon the Index [Expurgatorius]. I feel sensibly all differences between his apologetic wobbly vindication of the Church of Rome, and the sound and firm faith of Thomas Hill. October 2. Mr. Fitzhugh Whitehouse, having left here a copy of my From Sunset Ridge for me to furnish with a sentiment, I indited the following:--From Sunset Ridge we view the evening sky, Blood red and gold, defeat and victory; If in the contest we have failed or won, 'T was ours to live, to strive and so pass on. October 5.... To Peace Congress, where Albert Smiley was presiding. A wonderful feature came in the person of a Hindu religionist, who came to plead the cause of the Thibetan Llama. He said that the
Harry White (search for this): chapter 30
thought she would send flowers to my funeral. Mrs. Diaz is a loss — a high-strung, public-spirited woman with an heroic history. April 4. To the carriage-drivers' ball. They sent a carriage for me and I took Mary, the maid.... Mr. Dan was waiting outside for me, as was another of the committee who troubled me much, pulling and hauling me by one arm, very superfluous. My entrance was greeted with applause, and I was led to the high seats, where were two aides of the Governor, Dewey and White, the latter of whom remembers Governor Andrew. The opening march was very good. I was taken in to supper, as were the two officers just mentioned. We had a cozy little talk. I came away at about 10.30. April 14. Mr. Butcher came to breakfast at nine o'clock. He told me about the man Toynbee, whom he had known well. He talked also about Greeks and Hebrews, the animosity of race which kept them apart until the flourishing of the Alexandrian school, when the Jews greedily absorbed the p
William Wesselhoeft (search for this): chapter 30
I was to have spoken at this occasion and to have recited the poem which I wrote for Castle Square Theatre, but it was otherwise ordained. I rose as usual, my head a little misty. A mighty blow of vertigo seized me.... The elder Wesselhoeft pronounced it a brain fag, not likely to have serious results, but emphatically a warning not to abuse further my nervous strength. Got up in afternoon and finished Villa Claudia ; was bitterly sad at disappointing the suffragists and Deland. Dr. Wesselhoeft was asked on this occasion why, at her age, so severe an attack as this had not resulted in paralysis. Because, he replied, she brought to receive it the strength of forty years of age! Sure enough, the next day she felt as if her nervous balance was very well restored, and in a week she was at work again. May 18.... In the evening had word of a Decoration Day poem needed. At once tried some lines. May 19. Doubted much of my poem, but wrote it, spending most of the working ho
Theodore Ward (search for this): chapter 30
horses, their manes and tails braided with white ribbons. They drove part of the way to Philadelphia. November 28.... To Wellesley College.... William Butler Yeats lectured on the revival of letters in Ireland. We dined with him afterwards at Miss Hazard's house. He is a man of fiery temperament, with a slight, boyish figure: has deep-set blue eyes and dark hair; reminds me of John O'Sullivan Hawthorne's friend of the Democratic Review. in his temperament; is certainly, as Grandpa Ward said of the Red Revolutionists, with whom he dined in the days of the French Revolution, very warm. November 29 .... This came into my mind, apropos of reformers generally: Dost thou so carry thy light as to throw it upon thyself, or upon thy theme? This appears to me a legitimate question .... December 21. Put the last touches to my verses for Colonel Higginson's eightieth birthday. Maud went with me to the celebration held by the Boston Authors' Club at the Colonial Club, Cambridge.
Julia Ward (search for this): chapter 30
ost charmingly, read many of these tributes aloud, and the Birthday Queen responded in a rhyme scribbled hastily the day before. Here are a few of the tributes, together with her reply :-- Eistedfodd each bard of Wales, who roams the kingdom o'er each year salutes his chief with stanzas four; behold us here, each bearing verse in hand to greet the four-leaved clover of our band. Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Five O'Clock with the Immortals the sisters three who spin our fate greet Julia Ward, who comes quite late; how Greek wit flies! they scream with glee, drop thread and shears, and make the tea. E. H. Clement. if man could change the universe by force of epigrams in verse, He'd smash some idols, I allow, but who would alter Mrs. Howe? Robert Grant. Dot oldt Fader time must be cutting some dricks, Vhen he calls our goot Bresident's age eighty-six. an octogeranium! who would suppose? my dear Mrs. Julia Ward Howe der time goes! Yawcob Strauss (Charles Follen Ada
Deum. In October a lecture in South Berwick gave her the opportunity, always greatly enjoyed, of a visit to Sarah Orne Jewett and her sister Mary. November 1. South Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hamilton House described by Sarah in her Tory Lover. . . . Most interesting. Mrs. Tyson very cordial and delightful..... She came over later to dinner and we had such a pleasant time! In afternoon copied most of my screed for the BostoMrs. Tyson very cordial and delightful..... She came over later to dinner and we had such a pleasant time! In afternoon copied most of my screed for the Boston Globe. It surely was not on this occasion that she described dinner as a thing of courses and remorses! November 2. Took reluctant leave of the Jewett house and the trio, Sarah, Mary, and Annie Fields. We had a wonderful dish of pigeons for lunch .... It was delightful to see our mother and Miss Jewett together. They were the best of playmates, having a lovely intimacy of understanding. Their talk rippled with light and laughter. Such stories as they told! such songs as they sang
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