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ment to goodman Orton of Charlestown for making a carpaluing to wrap Mr. Mitchell and for doing something to his coffing that way 4s. This wrapping was of cloth covered with tar. When the grave was opened a few years ago some remains of the shroud were found, and a quantity of tansy which had been used as a disinfectant. Thus the work of goodman Orton again saw the light. One of the delicate matters in those days was the arranging of people and their names in the proper order. Not until 1773 were the names in the Harvard Catalogue placed in alphabetical order. The rank of the family to which the student belonged determined his place in the list. The first class starts in this way:-- Benjamin Woodbridge, A. M. Oxford 1648; S. T. D. Oxford. George Downing, Knight 1660, Baronet 1663; Ambass. to Netherlands from Cromwell to Charles II; M. P. Here we have the honors acquired by the sons added to those which they had inherited. In the meeting house, when the town wa
to keep this in repair and also all the glass against it. When there was no such private arrangement a committee assigned the seats after their own discretion and according to the rank of the family, or their age or property. This was called dignifying the house. There is the record in 1658, That the elders, deacons and selectmen for the time being shall be a constant and settled power for regulating the sitting of persons in the meeting house from time to tine as need shall require. In 1662 we come upon the work of the committee in such directions as these:-- Bro. Ri. Jackson's wife to sit there where sister Kempster was wont to sit. Mrs. Ulpham with her mother, Ester Sparlawke, in the place where Mrs. Upham is removed from. Joanna Winship in the place where Ester Sparhawke was wont to si--and so on. The people had great respect for the meeting house and its services, and gave to these their best thought. The first buildings were rude, but so were the houses of th
Some thynges of ye olden tyme. Dr. Alexander McKenzie. The ancient records of the First Church in Cambridge are very interesting but are not a complete account of all that was done here in the early days. The church was founded in 1636 and the oldest record is very near that date. There are some items of interest which not only tell us what was done, but give us a glimpse of some of the methods of that period. In 1638 Roger Harlakenden died. The record spells the name Harlakingdon —— they were not very particular about their spelling in those days. He left a legacy of £ 20 to the church. This appears to have been paid in 1640 by Herbert Pelham, who married the widow Harlakenden, in a young cow. For three summers the milk was given to different persons-brother Towne, brother John French, sister Manning; and in 1643 the cow was yeelded to Elder Frost for his owne, but her value had shrunk to 15. This is only one sign of the care which the church had for the poor, and it
ke lead mee. As we look back to those times it seems as if life must have been dull and hard. It would be so to us if we were placed in it, but if we had been born into it it would not have been so. Those who had come from England felt the difference between the old world and the new; but they did not look for much comfort in the wilderness, and whatever they lacked, they had themselves and their books and their own courage and faith. They had good books. Shakespeare died in 1616 and Bacon in 1626; their works were new and fresh, and there were other writers of great interest and worth. The Puritans did not spend much money on sports, but they spent money on schools, and they built a college. We commonly see their faces in repose and they look stern; but they had their glad hours when men smiled and children played. Home, love, marriage, and the joys which these terms suggest were here. The woods and streams gave the best of recreation to the boys when their tasks were fin
Shakespeare (search for this): chapter 4
teousnes For his name's sake lead mee. As we look back to those times it seems as if life must have been dull and hard. It would be so to us if we were placed in it, but if we had been born into it it would not have been so. Those who had come from England felt the difference between the old world and the new; but they did not look for much comfort in the wilderness, and whatever they lacked, they had themselves and their books and their own courage and faith. They had good books. Shakespeare died in 1616 and Bacon in 1626; their works were new and fresh, and there were other writers of great interest and worth. The Puritans did not spend much money on sports, but they spent money on schools, and they built a college. We commonly see their faces in repose and they look stern; but they had their glad hours when men smiled and children played. Home, love, marriage, and the joys which these terms suggest were here. The woods and streams gave the best of recreation to the boys
to my brother Cane for goinge to Salem with a message to Mr. Philips when he was about to come to us500 Payd my brother Towne for paynes taken more than ordinary in making cleane the meetinge house in the time of its repayringe0120 Payd for 9 times going to call the church together at 8d. a time060 Given to our sister Grissell in a hard time050 Sent our sister Manning a leg of mutton011 Payd Mr. Palsgrave for physic for our sister Albone 026 Payd for a goat for goody Albone to goodman Prentiss 010 Payd to John Shepheard for a fower gallon bottell to bring sack for the sacrament030 Payd to Mrs. Danforth in her husband's absence, in silver, the sume of 25 shillings for wine, sugar and spice at the buriall of Mrs. Chauncy who deseaced the 24 of the 11.67150 In 1668 the second minister of the church, the matchless Mitchel died. He had succeeded to the church and the parsonage and had married the widow of his predecessor. He died in an extreme hot season and there is the reco
a glimpse of some of the methods of that period. In 1638 Roger Harlakenden died. The record spells the name Harlakingdon —— they were not very particular about their spelling in those days. He left a legacy of £ 20 to the church. This appears to have been paid in 1640 by Herbert Pelham, who married the widow Harlakenden, in a young cow. For three summers the milk was given to different persons-brother Towne, brother John French, sister Manning; and in 1643 the cow was yeelded to Elder Frost for his owne, but her value had shrunk to 15. This is only one sign of the care which the church had for the poor, and it illustrates, also, the simplicity of the times. Here are a few records of disbursements:-- £s.d. Given to our brother Hall toward the rearing of his house that was blown down100 For the refreshing of brother Sill in time of fayntnes sent him 4 pints of sack024 Paid to my brother Cane for goinge to Salem with a message to Mr. Philips when he was about to come <
the cow was yeelded to Elder Frost for his owne, but her value had shrunk to 15. This is only one sign of the care which the church had for the poor, and it illustrates, also, the simplicity of the times. Here are a few records of disbursements:-- £s.d. Given to our brother Hall toward the rearing of his house that was blown down100 For the refreshing of brother Sill in time of fayntnes sent him 4 pints of sack024 Paid to my brother Cane for goinge to Salem with a message to Mr. Philips when he was about to come to us500 Payd my brother Towne for paynes taken more than ordinary in making cleane the meetinge house in the time of its repayringe0120 Payd for 9 times going to call the church together at 8d. a time060 Given to our sister Grissell in a hard time050 Sent our sister Manning a leg of mutton011 Payd Mr. Palsgrave for physic for our sister Albone 026 Payd for a goat for goody Albone to goodman Prentiss 010 Payd to John Shepheard for a fower gallon bottell to
Oliver Cromwell (search for this): chapter 4
oodman Orton again saw the light. One of the delicate matters in those days was the arranging of people and their names in the proper order. Not until 1773 were the names in the Harvard Catalogue placed in alphabetical order. The rank of the family to which the student belonged determined his place in the list. The first class starts in this way:-- Benjamin Woodbridge, A. M. Oxford 1648; S. T. D. Oxford. George Downing, Knight 1660, Baronet 1663; Ambass. to Netherlands from Cromwell to Charles II; M. P. Here we have the honors acquired by the sons added to those which they had inherited. In the meeting house, when the town was established in an orderly way, a proper regard was had to the position of the families and individuals. Often the house was finished by degrees. At first benches would be put in. Then some one who wished a place of his own would procure the deed of a space on the floor, some six feet square, and on this he would erect a pit or pew. He wa
ad been used as a disinfectant. Thus the work of goodman Orton again saw the light. One of the delicate matters in those days was the arranging of people and their names in the proper order. Not until 1773 were the names in the Harvard Catalogue placed in alphabetical order. The rank of the family to which the student belonged determined his place in the list. The first class starts in this way:-- Benjamin Woodbridge, A. M. Oxford 1648; S. T. D. Oxford. George Downing, Knight 1660, Baronet 1663; Ambass. to Netherlands from Cromwell to Charles II; M. P. Here we have the honors acquired by the sons added to those which they had inherited. In the meeting house, when the town was established in an orderly way, a proper regard was had to the position of the families and individuals. Often the house was finished by degrees. At first benches would be put in. Then some one who wished a place of his own would procure the deed of a space on the floor, some six feet squ
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