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Hudson River (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
nd the whites lived for a long time contentedly together, although these asked from time to time more land of them; and, proceeding higher up the Mahicanittuk(Hudson River), they believed they would soon want all their country, and which at this time was already the case. Iii.—The last voyage of Henry Hudson, and how he was seeater security of the traders, a castle—Fort Nassau—had been built on an island in 42dg; on the north side of the River Montagne, now called Mauritius. Now Hudson River. But as the natives there were somewhat discontented, and not easily managed, the projectors abandoned it, intending now to plant a colony among the Maikans, aCompany; but the milk remains to the profit of the boor: Farmer. he sells to those of the people who receive their wages for work every Settlement on the Hudson River. week. The houses of the Hollanders now stand without the fort; but, when that is completed, they will all repair within, so as to garrison it, and be secure
Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 13
ks's American Biography, vol. x. Brodhead's History of New York and O'Callaghan's History of New Netherlands also contain much information concerning him. To show the result of Hudson's discoveries, I give also a series of extracts from early Dutch chronicles, describing in quaint language the first founding of the New Netherlands. It is translated from Wassenaer's Historie van Europa (Amsterdam, 1621-1632), and is taken from O'Callaghan's Documentary History of the State of New York, vol.-east corner of James Bay. The narrative goes on to describe the terrible hardships endured by the mutinous crew, during which, Robert Juet and others died of starvation. The survivors reached Plymouth, England, in September, 1611.] Iv.—The Dutch settlement of the New Netherlands. [from early Dutch Chronicles.] [1624.] Numerous voyages realize so much profit for adventurers, that they discover other countries, which they afterwards settle and plant. Virginia, a country lying in 4
Sandy Hook, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
the State of New York, vol. III. pp. 27-28, 42-44. I.—Discovery of the Hudson River. [Hudson sailed from Amsterdam, on his third voyage, March 25, 1609. these extracts are from the diary of Robert Juet, one of his men, beginning on the day when they saw sandy hook, at the entrance of what is now New York harbor, Sept. 2, 1609.] Then the sun arose, and we steered away north again, and saw the land from the west by north, to the north-west by north, all like broken islands; Sandy Hook. and our soundings were eleven and ten fathoms. A fathom is six feet. Then we luffed Sailed to windward. in for the shore, and fair by the shore we had seven fathoms. The course along the land we found to be north-east by north from the land which we had first sight of, until we came to a great lake of water, as we could judge it to be, being drowned land, Flats covered by the tide. which made it to rise like islands, which was in length ten leagues. The mouth of that land hath
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
, and northwards; another builds houses; the third farms. Each farmer has his farm and the cows on the land purchased by the Company; but the milk remains to the profit of the boor: Farmer. he sells to those of the people who receive their wages for work every Settlement on the Hudson River. week. The houses of the Hollanders now stand without the fort; but, when that is completed, they will all repair within, so as to garrison it, and be secure from sudden attack. Those of the South River will abandon their fort, and come hither: no more than fifteen or sixteen men will remain at Fort Orange, the most distant point at which the Hollanders traded: the remainder will come down to the Manhates. Right opposite is the fort of the Maykans, which they built against their enemies, the Maquaes, Mohawks. a powerful people. It happened this year that the Maykans, being at war with the Maquaes, requested to be assisted by the commander of Fort Orange and six others. Commander
James Bay (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
und two hundred of biscuit cakes, a peck of meal, of beer to the quantity of a butt, one with another. Now it was said that the shallop was come within sight, they let fall the mainsail, and out with their topsails, and fly as from an enemy. Then I prayed them yet to remember themselves; but William Wilson—more than the rest—would hear of no such matter. [This is all that is known of the fate of Henry Hudson. These events are supposed to have occurred near the south-east corner of James Bay. The narrative goes on to describe the terrible hardships endured by the mutinous crew, during which, Robert Juet and others died of starvation. The survivors reached Plymouth, England, in September, 1611.] Iv.—The Dutch settlement of the New Netherlands. [from early Dutch Chronicles.] [1624.] Numerous voyages realize so much profit for adventurers, that they discover other countries, which they afterwards settle and plant. Virginia, a country lying in 42 1/2° North lati
Dartmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
, and steered away east southeast and south-east by east, off into the main sea. . . . We continued our course toward England, without seeing any land by the way, all the rest of this month of October; and on the seventh day of November, stilo novoa, New style. What was called the new style of reckoning by the Gregorian Calendar was not adopted in England till 1753, but by the other nations of Europe much earlier, being Saturday, by the grace of God we safely arrived in the range of Dartmouth, in Devonshire, in the year 1609. Ii.—Indian traditions of Henry Hudson's arrival. [the following narrative was written in 1800, by Rev. John Heckewelder, for many years a missionary among the Indians; the traditions having been told to him, as he says, forty years earlier, that is, about 1761, a century and a half after the coming of Hudson.] The following account of the first arrival of Europeans at New York Island is verbatim as it was related to me by aged and respected Dela
Plymouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
ail, and out with their topsails, and fly as from an enemy. Then I prayed them yet to remember themselves; but William Wilson—more than the rest—would hear of no such matter. [This is all that is known of the fate of Henry Hudson. These events are supposed to have occurred near the south-east corner of James Bay. The narrative goes on to describe the terrible hardships endured by the mutinous crew, during which, Robert Juet and others died of starvation. The survivors reached Plymouth, England, in September, 1611.] Iv.—The Dutch settlement of the New Netherlands. [from early Dutch Chronicles.] [1624.] Numerous voyages realize so much profit for adventurers, that they discover other countries, which they afterwards settle and plant. Virginia, a country lying in 42 1/2° North latitude. is one of these. It was first peopled by the French, afterwards by the English, and is today a flourishing colony. The Lords States General Of Holland. observing the great
York Island (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
off to carry the news to their scattered chiefs, that these might send off in every direction for the warriors to come in. These arriving in numbers, and themselves viewing the strange appearance, and that it was actually moving towards them,—the entrance of the river or bay, concluded it to be a large canoe or house, in which the Mannitto(great or supreme Being) himself was, and that he probably was coming to visit them. By this time the chiefs of the different tribes were assembled on York Island, and were deliberating on the manner they should receive their Mannittoon his arrival. Every step had been taken to be well provided with plenty of meat for a sacrifice. The women were required to prepare the best of victuals; idols or images were examined, and put in order; and a great dance was supposed not only to be an agreeable entertainment for the Mannitto,but might, with the addition of a sacrifice, contribute towards appeasing him, in case he was angry with them. The conjurer
Porto Rico (search for this): chapter 13
nearly north and south. The Honorable Pieter Minuit is director there at present; Jan Lempo, sheriff; Sebastiaen Jansz Crol and Jan Huyck, comforters of the sick, who, whilst awaiting a clergyman, read to the commonalty there on Sundays, from texts of Scripture with the comment. Francois Molemaecker is busy building a horse-mill, over which shall be constructed a spacious room, sufficient to accommodate a large congregation; and then a tower is to be erected, where the bells brought from Porto Rico will be hung. The Council there administered justice in criminal matters as far as imposing fines, but not as far as capital punishment. Should it happen that any one deserves that, he must be sent to Holland with his sentence. . . . There is another there who fills no public office: he is busy about his own affairs. Men work there as in Holland: one trades upwards, southwards, and northwards; another builds houses; the third farms. Each farmer has his farm and the cows on the land
Devonshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
away east southeast and south-east by east, off into the main sea. . . . We continued our course toward England, without seeing any land by the way, all the rest of this month of October; and on the seventh day of November, stilo novoa, New style. What was called the new style of reckoning by the Gregorian Calendar was not adopted in England till 1753, but by the other nations of Europe much earlier, being Saturday, by the grace of God we safely arrived in the range of Dartmouth, in Devonshire, in the year 1609. Ii.—Indian traditions of Henry Hudson's arrival. [the following narrative was written in 1800, by Rev. John Heckewelder, for many years a missionary among the Indians; the traditions having been told to him, as he says, forty years earlier, that is, about 1761, a century and a half after the coming of Hudson.] The following account of the first arrival of Europeans at New York Island is verbatim as it was related to me by aged and respected Delawares, Monseys,
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