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Cathay (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
other islands. To each of these I also gave a name, ordering that one should be called Santa Maria de la Concepcion; another, Fernandina; the third, Isabella; the fourth, Juana; and so with all the rest respectively. As soon as we arrived at that, which, as I have said, was named Juana, Cuba. I proceeded along its coast a short distance westward, and found it to be so large, and apparently without termination, that I could not suppose it to be an island, but the continental province of Cathay. Or Tartary. Seeing, however, no towns or populous places on the seacoast, but only a few detached houses and cottages, with whose inhabitants I was unable to communicate, because they fled as soon as they saw us, I went further on, thinking, that, in my progress, I should certainly find some city or village. At length, after proceeding a great way, and finding that nothing new presented itself, and that the line of coast was leading us northwards, I resolved not to attempt any further
Lisbon, Grafton County, New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
mples be adorned with festive boughs. Let Christ rejoice on earth, as he rejoices in heaven, in the prospect of the salvation of the souls of so many nations hitherto lost. Let us also rejoice, as well on account of the exaltation of our faith, as on account of the increase of our temporal prosperity, of which not only Spain, but all Christendom, will be partakers. Such are the events which I have briefly described. Farewell. Christopher Columbus, Admiral of the Fleet of the Ocean. Lisbon, the 14th of March. Ii.—Second voyage of Columbus. [this description is taken from a letter by Dr. Chanca, physician to the fleet of Columbus, to the authorities of Seville, Dr. Chanca's residence.] On the first Sunday after All Saints, namely, the 3d of November, 1493], about dawn, a pilot of the ship Capitana cried out, The reward! I see the land! The joy of the people was so great, that it was wonderful to hear their cries and exclamations of pleasure. And they had good rea
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
many islands, thickly peopled, of which I took possession, without resistance, in the name of our most illustrious Monarch, by public proclamation and with unfurled banners. To the first of these islands, which is called by the Indians Guanahani, I gave the name of the blessed Saviour (San Salvador), relying upon whose protection I had reached this as well as the other islands. To each of these I also gave a name, ordering that one should be called Santa Maria de la Concepcion; another, Fernandina; the third, Isabella; the fourth, Juana; and so with all the rest respectively. As soon as we arrived at that, which, as I have said, was named Juana, Cuba. I proceeded along its coast a short distance westward, and found it to be so large, and apparently without termination, that I could not suppose it to be an island, but the continental province of Cathay. Or Tartary. Seeing, however, no towns or populous places on the seacoast, but only a few detached houses and cottages, with w
Dominica (Dominica) (search for this): chapter 2
ll Saints, namely, the 3d of November, 1493], about dawn, a pilot of the ship Capitana cried out, The reward! I see the land! The joy of the people was so great, that it was wonderful to hear their cries and exclamations of pleasure. And they had good reason to be delighted; for they had become so wearied of bad living, and of working the water out of the ships, that all sighed most anxiously for land . . . . On the morning of the aforesaid Sunday, we saw lying before us an island; Dominica, so named from being discovered on Sunday. and soon on the right hand another appeared: the first was high and mountainous, on the side nearest to us; the other flat, and very thickly wooded. As soon as it became lighter, other islands began to appear on both sides; so that on that day there were six islands to be seen lying in different directions, and most of them of considerable size. We directed our course towards that which we had first seen; and, reaching the coast, we proceeded mo
St. Martin (search for this): chapter 2
oats in astonishment at so novel a sight; and, when a boat pushed on shore to speak with them, they cried out, Tayno, tayno! which is as much as to say, Good, good! and waited for the landing of the sailors, standing by the boat in such a manner that they might escape when they pleased. The result was, that none of the men could be persuaded to join us; and only two were taken by force, who were secured, and led away. . . . Another day, at the dinner-hour, we arrived at an island St. Martin, one of the Caribbee Islands. which seemed to be worth finding; for, judging by the extent of cultivation in it, it appeared very populous. We went thither, and put into harbor, when the admiral immediately sent on shore a well-manned barge to hold speech with the Indians, in order to ascertain what race they were, and also because we considered it necessary to gain some information respecting our course; although it afterwards plainly appeared that the admiral, who had never made that pa
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): chapter 2
oving along the coast of Española; for it was a hundred and thirty leagues from the spot where I landed to the city of San Domingo, where the governor dwelt.. When that expedition was finished, I went on foot to San Domingo, a distance of seventy leSan Domingo, a distance of seventy leagues, and waited in expectation of the arrival of ships from Spain, it being now more than a year since any had come. In this interval, it pleased God that three ships arrived, one of which I bought, and loaded it with provisions, —bread, wine, meespatched it to the place where the admiral was staying, in order that he might come over in it with all his people to San Domingo, and from thence sail for Spain. I myself went on in advance with the two other ships in order to give an account to so joyful a day; for he had never hoped to have left that place alive. And in that same ship he set sail, and went to San Domingo, and thence to Spain. IX.—Appeal of Columbus in his old age. [to the King and Queen of Spain. Taken from hi
Antigua (Antigua and Barbuda) (search for this): chapter 2
of the island until I should find a fair opportunity of putting to sea to prosecute my voyage. The admiral gave me seventy men, and with them, his brother the adelantado, to stay with me until I put to sea, and to remain there three days after my departure. With this arrangement, I returned to the extremity of the island, and remained there four days. Finding the sea become calm, I parted from the rest of the men with much mutual sorrow. I then commended myself to God and our Lady of Antigua, and was at sea five days and four nights without laying down the oar from my hand, but continued steering the canoe while my companions rowed. It pleased God, that, at the end of five days, I reached the Island of Española at Cape San Miguel, having been two days without eating or drinking; for our provisions were exhausted. I brought my canoe up to a very beautiful part of the coast, to which many of the natives soon came, and brought with them many articles of food; so that I remained
Seville (Spain) (search for this): chapter 2
also rejoice, as well on account of the exaltation of our faith, as on account of the increase of our temporal prosperity, of which not only Spain, but all Christendom, will be partakers. Such are the events which I have briefly described. Farewell. Christopher Columbus, Admiral of the Fleet of the Ocean. Lisbon, the 14th of March. Ii.—Second voyage of Columbus. [this description is taken from a letter by Dr. Chanca, physician to the fleet of Columbus, to the authorities of Seville, Dr. Chanca's residence.] On the first Sunday after All Saints, namely, the 3d of November, 1493], about dawn, a pilot of the ship Capitana cried out, The reward! I see the land! The joy of the people was so great, that it was wonderful to hear their cries and exclamations of pleasure. And they had good reason to be delighted; for they had become so wearied of bad living, and of working the water out of the ships, that all sighed most anxiously for land . . . . On the morning of th
Trinidad (Trinidad and Tobago) (search for this): chapter 2
oman Catholic prayers. we reached a cape, which I called Cape Galea, Now called Cape Galeota, the south-east point of Trinidad. having already given to the island the name of Trinidad; and here we found a harbor, which would have been excellent, bTrinidad; and here we found a harbor, which would have been excellent, but that there was no good anchorage. We saw houses and people on the spot; and the country around was very beautiful, and as fresh and green as the gardens of Valencia in the month of March . . . . The next day I set sail in the same direction, i the Island of Trinidad formed with the land of Gracia, The coast of Cumana (South America), distant seven miles from Trinidad. a strait of two leagues width from east to west; and, as we had to pass through it to go to the north, we found some stat the end of this time we arrived at the lowest point of the island of Cuba, at the province of Homo, where the city of Trinidad now stands; so that we were three hundred leagues farther from Spain than when we left Veragua for the purpose of procee
El Salvador (El Salvador) (search for this): chapter 2
om it. Thirty-three days after my departure from Cadiz, I reached the Indian Sea, Columbus always supposed that he had reached India, and therefore always called the natives Indians. where I discovered many islands, thickly peopled, of which I took possession, without resistance, in the name of our most illustrious Monarch, by public proclamation and with unfurled banners. To the first of these islands, which is called by the Indians Guanahani, I gave the name of the blessed Saviour (San Salvador), relying upon whose protection I had reached this as well as the other islands. To each of these I also gave a name, ordering that one should be called Santa Maria de la Concepcion; another, Fernandina; the third, Isabella; the fourth, Juana; and so with all the rest respectively. As soon as we arrived at that, which, as I have said, was named Juana, Cuba. I proceeded along its coast a short distance westward, and found it to be so large, and apparently without termination, that I c
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