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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers. Search the whole document.

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Apalachicola Bay (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
nwales The side of the vessel. above the water; and, more than this, we went so crowded, we could not move. So much can necessity do, which drove us to hazard our lives in this manner, running into a sea so turbulent, with not a single one that went there having a knowledge of navigation. The haven we left has for its name La Baya de Cavallos. The Bay of Horses, probably Choctawhatchee Bay, communicating with Pensacola Bay by Santa Rosa Inlet; but some suppose it to have been Appalachicola Bay. We passed waist-deep in water through sounds for seven days, without seeing any point of the coast; and at the close of them we came to an island near the land. My boat went first; and from her we saw Indians coming in five canoes, which they abandoned, and left in our hands. The other boats, seeing us go towards them, passed ahead, and stopped at some houses on the island, where we found many mullet and mullet-roes dried,—a great relief to the distress in which we were. After taki
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
sley's Tales of Old Travel. I.—The strange voyage. [Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca sailed for Florida in June, 1527, as treasurer of a Spanish armada, or armed fleet. In Cuba they encountered a hurricane, which delayed them; but they at last reached the coast of Florida in February, 1528, probably landing at what is now called Charlotte harbor. A portion of the party left their ships, and marched into the interior, reaching a region which they called Apalache, probably in what is now Alabama. Then they were driven back to the seashore, amid great hardships, losing one-third of their number before they reached Aute, now the Bay of St. Mark's. Near this they came to the sea; and here the narrative begins.] It was a piteous and painful thing to witness the perplexity and distress in which we were. At our arrival, we saw the little means there were of our advancing farther: there was not anywhere to go, and, if there had been, the people could not move forward, because the gr
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
they had made for our reception. They were all seated with their faces turned to the wall, their heads down, and the hair brought before their eyes, and their property placed in a heap in the middle of their houses. From this place forward they began to give us many blankets of skin, and they had nothing that they did not give to us. They have the finest persons of any that we saw, and of the greatest activity and strength, and [were those] who best understood us, and intelligently answered our inquiries. We called them los de las vacas, the cow nation, because most of the cattle that are killed are destroyed in their neighborhood; and along up that river over fifty leagues they kill great numbers. [Cabeza de Vaca crossed the Mississippi, or passed its mouth, many years before De Soto reached it. Having finally arrived at the city of Mexico, he was sent home to Europe, and reached Lisbon Aug. 15, 1537. His later adventures will be found in Southey's Hist. of Brazil, chap. v.]
Choctawhatchee Bay (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
forty-nine men. After the provision and clothes had been taken in, there remained not over a span of the gunwales The side of the vessel. above the water; and, more than this, we went so crowded, we could not move. So much can necessity do, which drove us to hazard our lives in this manner, running into a sea so turbulent, with not a single one that went there having a knowledge of navigation. The haven we left has for its name La Baya de Cavallos. The Bay of Horses, probably Choctawhatchee Bay, communicating with Pensacola Bay by Santa Rosa Inlet; but some suppose it to have been Appalachicola Bay. We passed waist-deep in water through sounds for seven days, without seeing any point of the coast; and at the close of them we came to an island near the land. My boat went first; and from her we saw Indians coming in five canoes, which they abandoned, and left in our hands. The other boats, seeing us go towards them, passed ahead, and stopped at some houses on the island, wher
Pensacola Bay (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
nd clothes had been taken in, there remained not over a span of the gunwales The side of the vessel. above the water; and, more than this, we went so crowded, we could not move. So much can necessity do, which drove us to hazard our lives in this manner, running into a sea so turbulent, with not a single one that went there having a knowledge of navigation. The haven we left has for its name La Baya de Cavallos. The Bay of Horses, probably Choctawhatchee Bay, communicating with Pensacola Bay by Santa Rosa Inlet; but some suppose it to have been Appalachicola Bay. We passed waist-deep in water through sounds for seven days, without seeing any point of the coast; and at the close of them we came to an island near the land. My boat went first; and from her we saw Indians coming in five canoes, which they abandoned, and left in our hands. The other boats, seeing us go towards them, passed ahead, and stopped at some houses on the island, where we found many mullet and mullet-ro
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 4
d every day they put their arrows to our hearts, saying that they were inclined to kill us in the way they had destroyed our friends. Lope Oviedo, my comrade, in fear, said that he wished to go back with the women who had crossed the bay with us, the men having remained some distance behind. I contended strongly with him against his returning, and I urged many objections; but in no way could I keep him. So he went back, and I remained alone with those savages. Iv.—The Indians of the gulf of Mexico. These are the most watchful in danger of any people I have ever seen. If they fear an enemy, they are awake the night long, with each a bow by his side, and a dozen arrows. He that sleeps tries his bow; and, if it is not strung, he gives the turn necessary to the cord. They often come out from their houses, bending to the ground in such manner, that they cannot be seen, and look and watch on all sides to catch every object. If they perceive any thing about, they are all in the b
Charlotte Harbor (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
8-1533.) These extracts are taken from The Narrative of Cabeza de Vaca, translated by Buckingham Smith, Washington, 1851, pp. 30-99. See, also, Henry Kingsley's Tales of Old Travel. I.—The strange voyage. [Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca sailed for Florida in June, 1527, as treasurer of a Spanish armada, or armed fleet. In Cuba they encountered a hurricane, which delayed them; but they at last reached the coast of Florida in February, 1528, probably landing at what is now called Charlotte harbor. A portion of the party left their ships, and marched into the interior, reaching a region which they called Apalache, probably in what is now Alabama. Then they were driven back to the seashore, amid great hardships, losing one-third of their number before they reached Aute, now the Bay of St. Mark's. Near this they came to the sea; and here the narrative begins.] It was a piteous and painful thing to witness the perplexity and distress in which we were. At our arrival, we saw t
Lisbon, Grafton County, New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
they had made for our reception. They were all seated with their faces turned to the wall, their heads down, and the hair brought before their eyes, and their property placed in a heap in the middle of their houses. From this place forward they began to give us many blankets of skin, and they had nothing that they did not give to us. They have the finest persons of any that we saw, and of the greatest activity and strength, and [were those] who best understood us, and intelligently answered our inquiries. We called them los de las vacas, the cow nation, because most of the cattle that are killed are destroyed in their neighborhood; and along up that river over fifty leagues they kill great numbers. [Cabeza de Vaca crossed the Mississippi, or passed its mouth, many years before De Soto reached it. Having finally arrived at the city of Mexico, he was sent home to Europe, and reached Lisbon Aug. 15, 1537. His later adventures will be found in Southey's Hist. of Brazil, chap. v.]
Brazil, Clay County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
they had made for our reception. They were all seated with their faces turned to the wall, their heads down, and the hair brought before their eyes, and their property placed in a heap in the middle of their houses. From this place forward they began to give us many blankets of skin, and they had nothing that they did not give to us. They have the finest persons of any that we saw, and of the greatest activity and strength, and [were those] who best understood us, and intelligently answered our inquiries. We called them los de las vacas, the cow nation, because most of the cattle that are killed are destroyed in their neighborhood; and along up that river over fifty leagues they kill great numbers. [Cabeza de Vaca crossed the Mississippi, or passed its mouth, many years before De Soto reached it. Having finally arrived at the city of Mexico, he was sent home to Europe, and reached Lisbon Aug. 15, 1537. His later adventures will be found in Southey's Hist. of Brazil, chap. v.]
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 4
Book IV: the strange voyage of Cabeza de Vaca. (A. D. 1528-1533.) These extracts are taken from The Narrative of Cabeza de Vaca, translated by Buckingham Smith, Washington, 1851, pp. 30-99. See, also, Henry Kingsley's Tales of Old Travel. I.—The strange voyage. [Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca sailed for Florida in June, 1527, as treasurer of a Spanish armada, or armed fleet. In Cuba they encountered a hurricane, which delayed them; but they at last reached the coast of Florida in February, 1528, probably landing at what is now called Charlotte harbor. A portion of the party left their ships, and marched into the interior, reaching a region which they called Apalache, probably in what is now Alabama. Then they were driven back to the seashore, amid great hardships, losing one-third of their number before they reached Aute, now the Bay of St. Mark's. Near this they came to the sea; and here the narrative begins.] It was a piteous and painful thing to witness the perple
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