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Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
route then led westward by the stage-road. At a distance of four miles from Hatcher's Run, the Quaker road runs northward from the stage-road to the Boydton plankroad. Warren was directed to move uumphreys' corps on the right of Warren, and both corps pushed northward—the latter moving on the Quaker road, the former through the woods between that road and Hatcher's Run. But as Humphreys' advan progress was toilsome and through a difficult country. When Warren, on the left, moving by the Quaker road, had advanced to within about two miles of the Confederate position, the resistance, which of facts. He suggested that Warren should send troops both by the Boydton plankroad and by the Quaker road, further to the east, even if he should give up the meditated rear attack. But the distance to Dinwiddie by the Quaker road was above ten miles, and, at the advanced hour of the night at which the dispatch was received, it would have been impossible for the troops by that road to have reac
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
days, destroying the railroad towards Richmond and Lynchburg, including the two large bridges over the north anidan's instructions prescribed that he should gain Lynchburg on the south bank of the James. From that point l he determined to abandon the purpose of capturing Lynchburg, and in the mean time to operate against the canalf possible, effect a crossing of the James between Lynchburg and Richmond. The former design was very completee to an interior line, either in the direction of Lynchburg or Danville, where uniting with the forces of Johnridges after him, escape into the mountains beyond Lynchburg. When, therefore, on the morning of the 6th, the s there, and covering a wagon-train moving towards Lynchburg; but on Barlow's approach it abandoned the place, Farmville, covering the stage and plank roads to Lynchburg. It proved to be too formidable for a front attace Appomattox and the James. If its outlet towards Lynchburg was closed, all was lost for Lee. Sheridan was has
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
made, it was necessary for him to constantly refuse his left and manoeuvre by his right. But this was to uncover the path by which Sherman might advance to unite with Grant. As this result, however, could not long be prevented, Johnston chose the former course and fell back in the direction of Raleigh, which was a judicious measure, since a junction of the two Confederate armies was now the governing desideratum. Pressing forward his advance, Sherman, the 23d of March, reached Goldsborough, North Carolina, where he united with the Federal columns that had moved out from Newbern and Wilmington. His course to Petersburg was then clear—the distance a hundred and fifty miles in a northerly direction. No immediate start, however, was made from Goldsborough, as well for the reason that his army had to be refitted as that General Grant feared if Sherman should then move any further on his way, Lee would abandon Petersburg and Richmond. This, as I have already intimated, was the thing n
St. Paul (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
, had borne a most distinguished part. In thus maintaining a stubborn attitude of resistance at the threshold of Petersburg, Lee had now but one thought, which was to hold his ground until the oncoming of night should enable him to put into execution the ulterior design he had formed. This design was communicated to the Richmond authorities in a message sent by Lee about eleven o'clock of the forenoon of that same Sunday. It was received by Mr. Davis while worshipping at the church of Saint Paul's; and those who, as he passed out, marked his countenance (on which it seemed the burden of an additional score of years had in a moment fallen), knew that message could bear nothing but tidings of direful import. It announced Lee's purpose of that night abandoning Petersburg and Richmond. V. The retreat and pursuit. It may well be supposed that the purpose of the hardy captain who designed to make an end of it before going back, was not relaxed, but rather intensified by the eve
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
scratch of an army without taking the trouble of making a reconnoissance even, Sheridan broke it in pieces, capturing two-thirds of it, with most of its artillery trains and colors. Then, defiling by the passes of the Blue Ridge, he struck Charlottesville, where he remained two days, destroying the railroad towards Richmond and Lynchburg, including the two large bridges over the north and south forks of the Rivanna River. He had now moved so far away that it was necessary for him to await ths to effectually break up those main branches of Lee's communications, the Lynchburg Railroad and James River Canal, after which he was to strike southward through Virginia to the Westward of Danville and join Sherman. But while awaiting at Charlottesville the arrival of his trains, the James River became so swollen by heavy rains as to be impassable. Nowise disconcerted by this untoward fortune, but with an admirable fertility of resource, he determined to abandon the purpose of capturing Ly
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
umber of cavalry necessary for picket duty, in the absence of the main army. A cavalry expedition from General Ord's command will also be started from Suffolk, to leave there on Saturday, the 1st of April, under Colonel Sumner, for the purpose of cutting the railroad about Hicksford. This, if accomplished, will have to be a surprise, and therefore from three to five hundred men will be sufficient. They should, however, be supported by all the infantry that can be spared from Norfolk and Portsmouth, as far out as to where the cavalry crosses the Blackwater. The crossing should probably be at Uniten. Should Colonel Sumner succeed in reaching the Weldon road, he will be instructed to do all the damage possible to the triangle of roads between Hicksford, Weldon, and Gaston. The railroad-bridge at Weldon being fitted up for the passage of carriages, it might be practicable to destroy any accumulation of supplies the enemy may have collected south of the Roanoke. All the troops will m
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
a brief glance at the relations which the gigantic vigor of Sherman had established between his own army and the opposing forces in Virginia. The communications on which Lee's army depended, not only for the maintenance of its interior lines with the remaining forces of the Confederacy in the Southwest, but for its supplies of food and ammunition, ran through the Carolinas and the seaboard States and radiated over the great productive territory of the central zone. By the capture of Atlanta, gained in the midsummer of 1864, Sherman grasped one of the main ganglia of the Southern railroad system. This was a loss terrible indeed to the Confederates, and narrowing the sphere of their activity and their means of intercommunication, yet not so deadly but that they might still, by the judicious use of such force as they had, oppose a menacing front and greatly prolong the war. But whatever opportunity was then afforded the Confederates of thus acting, was thrown away, with that
ill leave behind the minimum number of cavalry necessary for picket duty, in the absence of the main army. A cavalry expedition from General Ord's command will also be started from Suffolk, to leave there on Saturday, the 1st of April, under Colonel Sumner, for the purpose of cutting the railroad about Hicksford. This, if accomplished, will have to be a surprise, and therefore from three to five hundred men will be sufficient. They should, however, be supported by all the infantry that can be spared from Norfolk and Portsmouth, as far out as to where the cavalry crosses the Blackwater. The crossing should probably be at Uniten. Should Colonel Sumner succeed in reaching the Weldon road, he will be instructed to do all the damage possible to the triangle of roads between Hicksford, Weldon, and Gaston. The railroad-bridge at Weldon being fitted up for the passage of carriages, it might be practicable to destroy any accumulation of supplies the enemy may have collected south of the R
ly in a very modified sense could I be said to have as yet reported favorably to getting possession of the road. At most, I had but expressed my willingness to try, venturing a little on my own responsibility to achieve a desired end, and ready to make every hazard, if ordered. Simultaneous with this advance of General Ayres' picket-line, the enemy attacked us in heavy force. Warren: Report of Operations. Hardly, however, was this reconnoissance begun by an advance of the brigade of Winthrop, at half-past 10 A. M., than a heavy attack fell upon Warren. It was Lee's initiative. Often before had he broken up these turning movements in their inception by falling heavily on the exposed flank of the Union force. Once more he essayed the like blow, and, to give it all the weight possible, he threw into it the bulk of the troops he had collected and formed on his right. The attack upon Warren was sudden, and burst out simultaneously both from the north and west. It was indeed
F. C. Barlow (search for this): chapter 13
ishers. These were, however, quickly driven off, and the Second Corps crossed, Barlow's division leading. Artillery was put in position to cover an attack; but thisand De Trobriand, on the Old Stage road leading to Appomattox Courthouse, while Barlow's division was directed on Farmville, distant three miles. Barlow found this plBarlow found this place in possession of a considerable force of the enemy, that was burning the bridges there, and covering a wagon-train moving towards Lynchburg; but on Barlow's apprBarlow's approach it abandoned the place, destroying one hundred and thirty wagons, and rejoined the main body of Lee's army. This Humphreys found intrenched in a strong positi manifest that all that remained of the Army of Northern Virginia was present. Barlow's division was then ordered up. Meanwhile Humphreys, having extended his right ve six hundred in killed and wounded. It was too late to renew operations when Barlow arrived, and during the night Lee again retreated. While these events were i
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