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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. Search the whole document.

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y had but about 3,000 sheep in the Colony. Hist. Mass., i. 93. Winthrop says, This year there came over great store of provisions, both out of England and Ireland, and but few passengers (and those brought very little money), which was occasioned by the store of money and quick markets which the merchants found here the two or three years before, so as now all our money was drained from us, and cattle and all commodities grew very cheap, which enforced us at the next General Court, in the eighth month, to make an order, that corn should pass in payments of new debts; Indian, at 4s. the bushel; rye, at 5s., and wheat, at 6s.; and that upon all executions for former debts, the creditor might take what goods he pleased (or, if he had no goods, then his lands), to be appraised by three men, one chosen by the creditor, one by the debtor, and the third by the Marshall. Savage's Winthrop, II. 7. To this state of things Mr. Hooker probably referred when he renewed his efforts, in the
and I know he is sensible and watchful. I profess, how it is possible to keep peace with a man so adventurous and so pertinacious, who will vent what he list and maintain what he vents, its beyond all the skill I have to conceive. Mr. Umphrey, I hear, invites him to Providence, and that coast is most meet for his opinion and practice. The Lord says he will teach the humble his way; but where are those men? The Lord make us such, that he may shew us such mercy. Totus tuus, T. Hooker. Nov. 2th. 1640. I writ another letter, because happily Haply. some of the brethren would be ready to desire the sight of what is writ; that you may shew; this you ∧ shew or conceal, as you see meet. Sunt mutua preces in perpetuum. All here salute you and yours. A part of Mr. Hooker's letter was published in Albro's Life of Thomas Shepard, 1847; but his copy contained several mistakes which are here corrected, and the missing portions are inserted. The Town Records give no int
to the colonists, through life, by many kind offices in their behalf. This temptation to remove was not kept secret, though no direct reference to it appears on record. In addition to the before named discouragements, which tempted Mr. Shepard and his company to abandon Cambridge, may be mentioned the loss of two most valuable associates, namely John Haynes, who removed to Hartford in 1637, and Roger Harlakenden, who died November 17, 1638, aged 27 years. The former had been Assistant, 1634; Governor, 1635; and Assistant again, 1636, and remained in office up to the time of his removal in the spring of 1637;—the latter was elected Assistant in 1636, at the first election after his arrival, and reelected in 1637 and 1638. One was colonel, and the other lieutenant-colonel, of the military force. Both were conspicuous for moral excellence and mental ability, and each bore a large share of the pecuniary burdens of the public. The death of Mr. Harlakenden was peculiarly grievous to
s, through life, by many kind offices in their behalf. This temptation to remove was not kept secret, though no direct reference to it appears on record. In addition to the before named discouragements, which tempted Mr. Shepard and his company to abandon Cambridge, may be mentioned the loss of two most valuable associates, namely John Haynes, who removed to Hartford in 1637, and Roger Harlakenden, who died November 17, 1638, aged 27 years. The former had been Assistant, 1634; Governor, 1635; and Assistant again, 1636, and remained in office up to the time of his removal in the spring of 1637;—the latter was elected Assistant in 1636, at the first election after his arrival, and reelected in 1637 and 1638. One was colonel, and the other lieutenant-colonel, of the military force. Both were conspicuous for moral excellence and mental ability, and each bore a large share of the pecuniary burdens of the public. The death of Mr. Harlakenden was peculiarly grievous to Mr. Shepard, wh
least, not such good room as now. And now you may best sell. 5. Because Mr. Vane will be upon our skirts. Mr. Vane was elected Governor of Massachusetts in 1636, and was an active associate of Mrs. Hutchinson in the Antinomian party. Chiefly, it would seem, on account of his religious opinions, he was superseded in 1637, ed to Hartford in 1637, and Roger Harlakenden, who died November 17, 1638, aged 27 years. The former had been Assistant, 1634; Governor, 1635; and Assistant again, 1636, and remained in office up to the time of his removal in the spring of 1637;—the latter was elected Assistant in 1636, at the first election after his arrival, and1636, at the first election after his arrival, and reelected in 1637 and 1638. One was colonel, and the other lieutenant-colonel, of the military force. Both were conspicuous for moral excellence and mental ability, and each bore a large share of the pecuniary burdens of the public. The death of Mr. Harlakenden was peculiarly grievous to Mr. Shepard, who had been protected by h
and encouraged by Mr. Hooker, whose eldest daughter had become the second wife of Mr. Shepard in 1637. How far Mr. Hooker may have been influenced by family considerations, or how far by that spiritnomian party. Chiefly, it would seem, on account of his religious opinions, he was superseded in 1637, and soon returned to England. It was probably feared that he would use his great interest at coentioned the loss of two most valuable associates, namely John Haynes, who removed to Hartford in 1637, and Roger Harlakenden, who died November 17, 1638, aged 27 years. The former had been Assistant, and Assistant again, 1636, and remained in office up to the time of his removal in the spring of 1637;—the latter was elected Assistant in 1636, at the first election after his arrival, and reelected in 1637 and 1638. One was colonel, and the other lieutenant-colonel, of the military force. Both were conspicuous for moral excellence and mental ability, and each bore a large share of the pecuniar
August 30th, 1637 AD (search for this): chapter 8
here is no evidence that Mr. Shepard or his people had any jealousy, such as some have supposed to operate on their predecessors. On the contrary, Mr. Shepard was a prominent member of the religious party which had recently triumphed in the Antinomian controversy, and his own congregation had been preserved from all taint of the great heresy. Concerning the Antinomian and Famalistic opinions which then distracted the churches, Cotton Mather says, a synod This Synod met at Cambridge, Aug. 30, 1637, and began with prayer made by Mr. Shepard. Mr. Bulkeley of Concord, and Mr. Hooker, of Hartford, were the Moderators. Having condemned about eighty opinions, some blasphemous, others erroneous, and all unsafe,—the assembly brake up, Sept. 22, 1637.—Savage's Winthrop, i. 237-240. assembled at Cambridge, whereof Mr. Shepard was no small part, most happily crushed them all. The vigilancy of Mr. Shepard was blessed, not only for the preservation of his own congregation from the rot of the
September 22nd, 1637 AD (search for this): chapter 8
an controversy, and his own congregation had been preserved from all taint of the great heresy. Concerning the Antinomian and Famalistic opinions which then distracted the churches, Cotton Mather says, a synod This Synod met at Cambridge, Aug. 30, 1637, and began with prayer made by Mr. Shepard. Mr. Bulkeley of Concord, and Mr. Hooker, of Hartford, were the Moderators. Having condemned about eighty opinions, some blasphemous, others erroneous, and all unsafe,—the assembly brake up, Sept. 22, 1637.—Savage's Winthrop, i. 237-240. assembled at Cambridge, whereof Mr. Shepard was no small part, most happily crushed them all. The vigilancy of Mr. Shepard was blessed, not only for the preservation of his own congregation from the rot of these opinions, but also for the deliverance of all the flocks which our Lord had in the wilderness. And it was with a respect unto this vigilancy, and the enlightening and powerful ministry of Mr. Shepard, that, when the foundation of a college was to
Very probably Gov. Winthrop intended that Mr. Hooker should make a personal application of his general remarks contained in a letter addressed to him as early as 1638: If you could show us the men that reproached you, we should teach them better manners than to speak evil of this good land God hath brought us to, and to discourae up to the time of his removal in the spring of 1637;—the latter was elected Assistant in 1636, at the first election after his arrival, and reelected in 1637 and 1638. One was colonel, and the other lieutenant-colonel, of the military force. Both were conspicuous for moral excellence and mental ability, and each bore a large shby this most precious servant of Jesus Christ, and bitterly lamented his early death; This loss was partially repaired by the accession of Herbert Pelham, Esq., in 1638 or 1639. He married the widow of Mr. Harlakenden, and was successively Treasurer of Harvard College, 1643, Assistant, 1645-49, and Commissioner of the United Colo
November 17th, 1638 AD (search for this): chapter 8
fears were groundless. Mr. Vane manifested his friendship to the colonists, through life, by many kind offices in their behalf. This temptation to remove was not kept secret, though no direct reference to it appears on record. In addition to the before named discouragements, which tempted Mr. Shepard and his company to abandon Cambridge, may be mentioned the loss of two most valuable associates, namely John Haynes, who removed to Hartford in 1637, and Roger Harlakenden, who died November 17, 1638, aged 27 years. The former had been Assistant, 1634; Governor, 1635; and Assistant again, 1636, and remained in office up to the time of his removal in the spring of 1637;—the latter was elected Assistant in 1636, at the first election after his arrival, and reelected in 1637 and 1638. One was colonel, and the other lieutenant-colonel, of the military force. Both were conspicuous for moral excellence and mental ability, and each bore a large share of the pecuniary burdens of the publi
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