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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. Search the whole document.

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Elijath Corlet (search for this): chapter 8
oman20 9. William Clemmance30 10. Richard Cutter80 11. Thomas Longhorne60 12. Daniell Blogget40 13. Robert Holmes150 14. Th. Hall20 15. Widow Banbricke40 16. John Jacson50 17. Wm. Homan50 18. Nath. Greene and Mother80 19. Richard ffrench20 20. John Watson80 21. Richard Woodes10 22. John Taylor60 23. Wid: Wilkerson60 24. Lieft. William ffrench150 25. Joseph Miller15 26. Jonath. Hide20 27. David ffiske60 28. Wid: Hancocke10 29. And. Stevenson60 30. Mr. Elijath Corlet100 31. David Stone50 32. Tho. Danforth220 Lot. Acres. 33. Rich. ffrances 60 34. John Parker 10 35. Jonath. Padlefoote 15 36. Edw. Hall 70 37. Ri. Oldam 60 38. Gilbert Cracbone 90 39. Robert Stedman 90 40. Tho. Swoetman 70 41. Wm. Bordman 60 42. John Betts 90 43. John Shepard 60 44. Daniell Stone 50 45. John ffrenches children 30 46. John ffownell 100 47. Samll. Hides 80 48. Tho. Marret 200 49. Edw. Winship 200 50. Goodm. Hammond 15 51. Steven Da
Peter Bulkeley (search for this): chapter 8
jealousy, such as some have supposed to operate on their predecessors. On the contrary, Mr. Shepard was a prominent member of the religious party which had recently triumphed in the Antinomian controversy, and his own congregation had been preserved from all taint of the great heresy. Concerning the Antinomian and Famalistic opinions which then distracted the churches, Cotton Mather says, a synod This Synod met at Cambridge, Aug. 30, 1637, and began with prayer made by Mr. Shepard. Mr. Bulkeley of Concord, and Mr. Hooker, of Hartford, were the Moderators. Having condemned about eighty opinions, some blasphemous, others erroneous, and all unsafe,—the assembly brake up, Sept. 22, 1637.—Savage's Winthrop, i. 237-240. assembled at Cambridge, whereof Mr. Shepard was no small part, most happily crushed them all. The vigilancy of Mr. Shepard was blessed, not only for the preservation of his own congregation from the rot of these opinions, but also for the deliverance of all the flocks
Richard Champney (search for this): chapter 8
d may be disengaged from this place and be one entire body of itself,—the town consented to choose five persons a Committee to treat and conclude with them concerning their request therein; at which time there was chosen Mr. Henry Dunster, Elder Champney, John Bridge, Edward Goffe, and Edward Winship. The result appears in the Record of the General Court, under date of May 23, 1655:— In answer to the desire of our brethren and neighbors, the inhabitants of Shawshin, requesting immunities ahave any allotments granted them there, and return hereof made to the inhabitants of Cambridge within ten days after the end of the first session of the next General Court. Given under our hands this 17th 12m. 1654, by us, Henry Dunster, Richard Champney, Edward Goffe, John Bridge. These propositions are accepted of and consented unto by us the present inhabitants of Shawshin; and we do humbly crave this honored Court to confirm and record the same. Your humble servants, Ralph
Edmund Angier (search for this): chapter 8
John Hasteings80 82. Henry Prentise 80 83. Elder Champnis 350 84. Nath. Sparhauke140 85. John Stedman300 86. Willm. Russell60 87. William Patten 90 88. Ben. Bower20 89. Tho. Briggam 180 90. John Russell80 91. Will. Bucke20 92. Richard Ecles70 93. Mrs. Sarah Simes50 94. Mr. Jacson400 95. Mr. Andrews150 96. Abra. Errington70 97. Widd: Cutter40 98. ffr. Moore, senr.50 99. Mr. Josseph Cooke300 100. Wm. Wilcocke90 101. Christopher Cane80 102. Rich. Dana20 103. Mr. Angier300 104. Vincet Druse15 105. Rogr. Bancroft100 106. John Cooper 140 107. Edw. Shepard80 108. Tho. Bridge50 109. Ranold Bush10 110. Tho. Prentise150 111. Math. Bridge 80 112. Golden Moore100 113. Robert Brodish30 Memo. There is these two persons overslipped, viz. 28. Richard Robbins80 91. Daniell Wines10 These two lots must come in their due order. The town do give to Gregory Stone, adjoining to his farm, one hundred acres.100 Although, by the generosity of the Ch
Roger Bancroft (search for this): chapter 8
lder Champnis 350 84. Nath. Sparhauke140 85. John Stedman300 86. Willm. Russell60 87. William Patten 90 88. Ben. Bower20 89. Tho. Briggam 180 90. John Russell80 91. Will. Bucke20 92. Richard Ecles70 93. Mrs. Sarah Simes50 94. Mr. Jacson400 95. Mr. Andrews150 96. Abra. Errington70 97. Widd: Cutter40 98. ffr. Moore, senr.50 99. Mr. Josseph Cooke300 100. Wm. Wilcocke90 101. Christopher Cane80 102. Rich. Dana20 103. Mr. Angier300 104. Vincet Druse15 105. Rogr. Bancroft100 106. John Cooper 140 107. Edw. Shepard80 108. Tho. Bridge50 109. Ranold Bush10 110. Tho. Prentise150 111. Math. Bridge 80 112. Golden Moore100 113. Robert Brodish30 Memo. There is these two persons overslipped, viz. 28. Richard Robbins80 91. Daniell Wines10 These two lots must come in their due order. The town do give to Gregory Stone, adjoining to his farm, one hundred acres.100 Although, by the generosity of the Church, all the inhabitants received allotments of
Richard Ecles (search for this): chapter 8
. Nicho. Withe 90 71. Willm. Hamlet 60 72. Willm. Towne 70 73. Samll. Greene 80 74. Robert Browne 40 75. John Boutell 20 76. John Bridge 250 77. Tho. Beal 100 78. Richard Parke100 79. franc. Whitmore50 80. Jonas Clearke60 81. John Hasteings80 82. Henry Prentise 80 83. Elder Champnis 350 84. Nath. Sparhauke140 85. John Stedman300 86. Willm. Russell60 87. William Patten 90 88. Ben. Bower20 89. Tho. Briggam 180 90. John Russell80 91. Will. Bucke20 92. Richard Ecles70 93. Mrs. Sarah Simes50 94. Mr. Jacson400 95. Mr. Andrews150 96. Abra. Errington70 97. Widd: Cutter40 98. ffr. Moore, senr.50 99. Mr. Josseph Cooke300 100. Wm. Wilcocke90 101. Christopher Cane80 102. Rich. Dana20 103. Mr. Angier300 104. Vincet Druse15 105. Rogr. Bancroft100 106. John Cooper 140 107. Edw. Shepard80 108. Tho. Bridge50 109. Ranold Bush10 110. Tho. Prentise150 111. Math. Bridge 80 112. Golden Moore100 113. Robert Brodish30 Memo. There is th
John Haynes (search for this): chapter 8
Weathersfield, Conn. Letter from Winthrop to Hooker. Letter from Hooker to Shepard. depreciation in the value of property. danger of general bankruptcy. reasons for removing. Sir Henry Vane. grant of Shawshine to Cambridge. removal of John Haynes. death of Roger Harlakenden. arrival of Herbert Pelham. Town Spring. Restrictions on the cutting of trees. Field-drivers, Commissioners to end small causes, Clerk of the Market, and Sealer of Leather, first elected. Calves impounded. eit secret, though no direct reference to it appears on record. In addition to the before named discouragements, which tempted Mr. Shepard and his company to abandon Cambridge, may be mentioned the loss of two most valuable associates, namely John Haynes, who removed to Hartford in 1637, and Roger Harlakenden, who died November 17, 1638, aged 27 years. The former had been Assistant, 1634; Governor, 1635; and Assistant again, 1636, and remained in office up to the time of his removal in the spr
N. E. Hist (search for this): chapter 8
t supply, in the passage from Europe. As the inhabitants multiplied, the demand for the cattle increased, and the price of a milch cow had kept from 25 to 30l, but fell at once this year to 5 or 6l. A farmer, who could spare but one cow in a year out of his stock, used to clothe his family with the price of it, at the expense of the new comers; when this failed they were put to difficulties. Although they judged they had 12,000 neat cattle, yet they had but about 3,000 sheep in the Colony. Hist. Mass., i. 93. Winthrop says, This year there came over great store of provisions, both out of England and Ireland, and but few passengers (and those brought very little money), which was occasioned by the store of money and quick markets which the merchants found here the two or three years before, so as now all our money was drained from us, and cattle and all commodities grew very cheap, which enforced us at the next General Court, in the eighth month, to make an order, that corn should p
he did as verily believe the truth of his opinions as that there was a God in heaven, and that he was settled in it as the earth was upon the centre. If ever such confidence find good success, I miss of my mark. Since then he hath sent to Mr. Prydden to come to them, being invited by some of the Brethren by private letters: I gave warning to Mr. Prydden to bethink himself what he did; and I know he is sensible and watchful. I profess, how it is possible to keep peace with a man so adventMr. Prydden to bethink himself what he did; and I know he is sensible and watchful. I profess, how it is possible to keep peace with a man so adventurous and so pertinacious, who will vent what he list and maintain what he vents, its beyond all the skill I have to conceive. Mr. Umphrey, I hear, invites him to Providence, and that coast is most meet for his opinion and practice. The Lord says he will teach the humble his way; but where are those men? The Lord make us such, that he may shew us such mercy. Totus tuus, T. Hooker. Nov. 2th. 1640. I writ another letter, because happily Haply. some of the brethren would be ready
John Winthrop (search for this): chapter 8
civil History. Contemplated removal to Weathersfield, Conn. Letter from Winthrop to Hooker. Letter from Hooker to Shepard. depreciation in the value of prope, his own letters to Mr. Shepard afford conclusive evidence. Very probably Gov. Winthrop intended that Mr. Hooker should make a personal application of his general . Shephard and his whole church from us. Sic fama est. Life and Letters of John Winthrop, Esq., vol. II., p. 421. Two years later, Mr. Hooker wrote an earnest lettcattle, yet they had but about 3,000 sheep in the Colony. Hist. Mass., i. 93. Winthrop says, This year there came over great store of provisions, both out of Englandby the creditor, one by the debtor, and the third by the Marshall. Savage's Winthrop, II. 7. To this state of things Mr. Hooker probably referred when he renewers erroneous, and all unsafe,—the assembly brake up, Sept. 22, 1637.—Savage's Winthrop, i. 237-240. assembled at Cambridge, whereof Mr. Shepard was no small part, mo
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