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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
and the merits of both the argument and the question are decided by vote to be on that side. Later, we have the trial of H. W. Hall, an alleged fugitive from South Carolina, before the United States Commissioner (me), and Tom is counsel for the defendant, who had been duly blackened for the part he was to play. The Commissioner following letter, the colonelcy of one to be raised in Massachusetts; being the first recruited under State authority, although one was already in service in South Carolina and another in Kansas. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Department, Boston, January 30, 1863. Captain Robert G. Shaw, Second Regiment Massachu it will, I shall thank God a thousand times that I was led to take my share in it. The following extracts will give some idea of his short experiences in South Carolina and Georgia. After visiting some of the deserted plantations and talking with the negroes, he writes:— June 13. A deserted homestead is always a
Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
colored troops. I have just come in from the front with my regiment, where we were sent as soon as the Rebels retired. This shows that the events of the morning did not destroy the General's confidence in us. Cole's Island (opposite Folly Island), July 17, 4 P. M. James Island was evacuated last night by our forces. My regiment started first, at half past 9, P. M. Not a thing was moved until after dark, and the Rebels must have been astonished this morning. Terry went there orihe transport General Hunter, in a boat which took about fifty at a time. There they breakfasted on the same fare, and had no other food before entering into the assault on Fort Wagner in the evening. The General Hunter left Cole's Island for Folly Island at six A. M., and the troops landed at Pawnee Landing about half past 9, A. M., and thence marched to the point opposite Morris Island, reaching there about two o'clock in the afternoon. They were transported in a steamer across the inlet, an
Hudson River (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
t here. I did n't feel very homesick that time I went down to New York; but I did n't like to stay here, while you were in the city. If they had whipped me then, I am almost certain I should have run away again, I should have been so mad. As it was, I came near going the second time I was sent out of the study-room. One of the boys ran away from here during vacation, and they thought his father had taken him home, and his father thought he was up here; but he went aboard a sloop on the Hudson River, and worked there for a month. When he went home, his father asked him why he had n't written to him, for he thought he was at the college all the time, and nobody knows anything about it but a few of the boys. After I came up from New York with father, this boy asked me to run away with him again, and do the same as he did before; and then I would have done it if it was n't getting cold, but I would n't do it now. I felt sort of angry then, because I had to come back; and if I got puni
White Oak Swamp (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
attles and skirmishes, without receiving a wound; and the hard activities of army life had the effect to improve his health, and built up his youthful person into the stalwart, sinewy frame of an athletic man. He was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant for gallant conduct while in action on the seven days retreat from Richmond, and assigned to Company C, then under command of Captain Batchelder. He won especial commendation on the part of his commanding officers at the battle of White Oak Swamp. One of his fellow-soldiers thus testifies:— His bravery was so distinguished as to be the general subject of remark among men who were accustomed to regard all dangers as so many trivial things easily forgotten when passed . . . . . At Antietam he won his rank of First Lieutenant; and to have lived through the ordeal of that day was to have come from the very jaws of death. The religious zeal and integrity which had marked him in college characterized also his army life, but
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
n reached him then, when such rewards are sweetest. On the 23d of March he set out for the army. At Fortress Monroe he proposed to remain a day with a friend, but soon after breakfast, hearing that there was fighting at the front, rushed down to the wharf, and luckily found a steamer just starting with despatches, and came up on her. The last campaign of the Army of the Potomac had begun. Wounded at Antietam, Major Mills had passed safely through the battles of the Wilderness, two at Spottsylvania, North Anna, Shady Grove, Bethesda Church; June 17th, at Petersburg,—the mine, the siege, the Weldon Railroad; Preble's Farm and Hatcher's Run, October 26, 1864; besides skirmishes. On the 31st of March, 1865, at Hatcher's Run, Virginia, on the same spot where he had been exposed to the fire of a Rebel battery the year before, he fell. Major-General Humphreys, on whose staff he was, thus describes his death:— I rode a short distance to a small hollow, from which I could, unseen
Mount Auburn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ody was recovered; and his face, even in death, wore a singularly placid expression. At the request of many citizens and friends in Lowell, his parents, who before the breaking out of the war had removed to Boston, waived their preference for Mount Auburn as the place of his interment, and it took place at Lowell. The same hand that sprinkled the waters of baptism upon his infant face committed his body to the earth. A monument, inscribed with his name and a brief record of his services, and hose who, in that dark night of national disaster, were anxiously watching for the dawn, as well as to those who must wait yet more wearily under the shadow of personal bereavement for the morning of a better day. The remains were deposited at Mount Auburn, in whose sacred precincts he had delighted when at Cambridge to seclude himself for study and meditation. In person Lieutenant Newcomb was above the medium height, with well-proportioned figure, pleasing features, and a complexion of femin
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
to co-operate in the work of changing the base of the army from White House to Harrison's Landing. This force consisted of light cavalry and artillery, with two regiments of infantry, and was placed in command of General Stoneman. The Massachusetts Eighteenth was one of the regiments selected for this arduous service and most efficiently did its part. General Stoneman and his command, after reaching White House and accomplishing the object of the expedition, moved down the Peninsula to Old Point Comfort, and embarked for Harrison's Landing. Here they rejoined the shattered army on the 2d of July. For a little over a month, in the course of which Lieutenant Russell was promoted one grade, his regiment remained with the main body of the army on the James River, making reconnoissances from time to time, and keeping watch of the enemy. The scene of active operations was then transferred to the northern part of Virginia, and the regiment shared the experiences of General Pope's ca
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ward Gardner Abbott. Captain 2d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), May 24, 1861; Brevet Major, August 9, 1862; killed at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. Edward Gardner Abbott, eldest son of Hon. Josiah Gardner and Caroline (Livermore) Abbott, was om his first manly interview with me in my office in Boston until I looked upon his dead body upon the fatal field of Cedar Mountain. Of the fourteen officers killed, wounded, and prisoners out of this single regiment in this action, none behaved wid he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Volunteers, which had just immortalized itself at Cedar Mountain. The evening of August 17th found the young lieutenant with his regiment at Culpeper, in temporary command of Companles F. Choate, Esqs. In the summer of 1862, and about the time of the disasters to Pope's army and the battles of Cedar Mountain and Manassas, came the call for nine months volunteers, and Weston was one of the first to respond, enlisting from th
Shady Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
uch rewards are sweetest. On the 23d of March he set out for the army. At Fortress Monroe he proposed to remain a day with a friend, but soon after breakfast, hearing that there was fighting at the front, rushed down to the wharf, and luckily found a steamer just starting with despatches, and came up on her. The last campaign of the Army of the Potomac had begun. Wounded at Antietam, Major Mills had passed safely through the battles of the Wilderness, two at Spottsylvania, North Anna, Shady Grove, Bethesda Church; June 17th, at Petersburg,—the mine, the siege, the Weldon Railroad; Preble's Farm and Hatcher's Run, October 26, 1864; besides skirmishes. On the 31st of March, 1865, at Hatcher's Run, Virginia, on the same spot where he had been exposed to the fire of a Rebel battery the year before, he fell. Major-General Humphreys, on whose staff he was, thus describes his death:— I rode a short distance to a small hollow, from which I could, unseen, as I believed, observe t
Staten Island (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
bot, in West Roxbury; and finally to that of Mr. William P. Atkinson, with whom he began the Latin Grammar. When he was nine years old, his parents removed to Staten Island, where he went to a small private school, kept by a learned and very impatient old German, who did not help the little fellow to any more love of hic, hoec, hon in May, just at the beginning of the Presidential campaign of 1856, in which he took a strong interest, although too young to vote. He passed the summer at Staten Island, studying under the guidance of Mr. Barlow (since Major-General Barlow), and entered Harvard College at the opening of the term in August. Cambridge, S seventy-five thousand men, he marched with his regiment to Washington, leaving the following note for his father, who was expected home in three days: Staten Island, April 18, 1861. my dear father,—When you get home you will hear why I am not here to receive you. Badly as I feel at going before you come, it seems the
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