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Jamaica Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
t his office in Boston, until the fall of 1860, when he entered the Law School at Cambridge, and remained there until he had determined to join the Army of the Union. Though born in the city, and for some years attending Boston schools, his life was mainly passed in the country, or within easy access to those opportunities of rural sport which an enterprising, spirited boy is always eager to improve. The woods, hills, and pastures of Nonantum, West Roxbury, and Longwood, the waters of Jamaica Pond, Charles River, and Boston Harbor, gave ample scope for a love, which in him was very strong, for adventurous excursions and all vigorous exercises. He could row a boat, ride a horse, throw a ball, skate, swim, and climb with the best of his fellows. His constitution was vigorous, his health perfect, his spirits exuberant, his nature generous, his tastes cultivated. He never greatly taxed himself in school or college studies. His intellect was the ready servant of a stout, warm heart,
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
crupulous cleanliness, not only in their arms, equipments, and uniforms, but in their persons. He was careful of their health in every way. He never grew careless about routine matters, as so many able officers do. He was always prompt at his roll-calls, regular and thorough in his inspections. The rifles of his men were kept in a condition that would appear incredible in description. His early regard to the performance of the duties of sentinels never left him. In his last camp, near Brandy Station, when the third year of the war was nearing its end, he was as attentive to this matter as if his men had everything to learn. It was his daily habit closely to supervise the inspection of his camp guard, and to catechize the whole guard in their duties before they marched on. His strict discipline, his perfect familiarity with his duties, and his conspicuous gallantry, made his men respect and prize him. His readiness to share all their privations and exposures and fatigues, his wat
Longwood (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
raduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1829, and was admitted to the Suffolk Bar, but never actively prosecuted his profession. He died at his residence in Longwood, Brookline, a few months before Warren entered the military service. The mother of Lieutenant Russell was the daughter of William Hooper, Esq., of Marblehead. on, he was placed at the boarding-school of Mr. Cornelius M. Vinson, at Jamaica Plain. But his final preparation for college, made after his father's removal to Longwood, was accomplished under the tuition of Mr. Thomas G. Bradford, a teacher of high repute in Boston. He entered Harvard College in the year 1856, with the classthose opportunities of rural sport which an enterprising, spirited boy is always eager to improve. The woods, hills, and pastures of Nonantum, West Roxbury, and Longwood, the waters of Jamaica Pond, Charles River, and Boston Harbor, gave ample scope for a love, which in him was very strong, for adventurous excursions and all vigo
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ring since midnight. At a little distance outside the town they halted, but soon the fighting became general, and two Pennsylvania regiments broke and ran, leaving the Second exposed upon its flank and in much peril. By a skilful manoeuvre, execute, July 6. We don't know with any certainty what is going on in the North, but can't believe Lee will get far into Pennsylvania. No matter if the Rebels get to New York, I shall never lose my faith in our ultimate success. We are not yet ready and followed the engagement at Chancellorsville, as well as in the terrible fatigues of the race with Lee's army into Pennsylvania. But after the battle of Gettysburg his strength failed him utterly, and he was forced to take to an ambulance. In wommanding officer, had occasion to mark his courage and gallantry. Upon the subsequent march through Maryland and Pennsylvania to Gettysburg, one of the most painful and difficult this army has ever performed, Lieutenant Weston, although sufferi
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
erred to the northern part of Virginia, and the regiment shared the experiences of General Pope's campaign. On the 30th of August the battle was to be fought which would determine whether the Rebel invasion should roll its tide northward into Maryland, and imperil the national capital, or should be effectually stayed on the first battle-ground of the war. It was the first and only general battle in which Lieutenant Russell was engaged, though on many previous occasions his high qualities as an the confidence and esteem of all. At the battle of Chancellorsville, where the regiment was first engaged after he had joined, I, as his commanding officer, had occasion to mark his courage and gallantry. Upon the subsequent march through Maryland and Pennsylvania to Gettysburg, one of the most painful and difficult this army has ever performed, Lieutenant Weston, although suffering from severe illness, at the time, marched with his company, and by his patience and fortitude won the regar
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
I only wish you could have seen me. I don't think you would have known me at all. It's a sad truth that I was obliged to shave, the prominence of my beard and moustache being an obstacle to my appearing as a woman. But without joking, it would have showed, especially by candle-light, so I took it off. A New York Tribune came yesterday, and in it I read a long account of the new Abolition Society of New York and its Vicinity, and also an account of a slave having been burnt alive in Alabama. I did not think this last would ever happen again. During the spring of 1855 he made a tour through Sweden and Norway, with two companions, and enjoyed it to the utmost. On September 10th he wrote:— What awful riots there have been in America lately! I don't know how the country seems to those who are living in it; but looking at it through the newspapers, both American and German, it looks pretty bad. But then, if you ever read anything about America written in Germany,
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
olonel 54th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), April 17, 1863; killed at Fort Wagner, S. C., July 18, 1863. during the years 1859 and 1860 there mightcommon character. This was Robert Shaw, who now lies buried on Morris Island, in Charleston Harbor, one of the many thousand young men who hg. Terry went there originally only to create a diversion from Morris Island, and it was useless to stay and risk being driven off, after Mowo days. It seems like old times in the Army of the Potomac. Morris Island, July 18. We are in General Strong's brigade. We came up ut half past 9, A. M., and thence marched to the point opposite Morris Island, reaching there about two o'clock in the afternoon. They were ays, and know how he regarded them. The march across Folly and Morris Island was over a very sandy road, and was very wearisome. When they prisoner by the Rebels the morning after the assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, July 19, 1863. While being conducted into the fort I s
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
result of the contest in which he fell, I think he would rejoice at the sacrifice of his earthly hopes so far as they related to all else. But dearer than all praise of a soldier, to those who love him, is the memory of the pure heart, the tender affection, the magnanimous generosity of Charlie Mills. Charles Redington Mudge. First Lieutenant 2d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), May 25, 1861; Captain, July 8, 1861; Major, November 9, 1862; Lieutenant-Colonel, June 6, 1863; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863. Charles Redington Mudge was the son of Enoch Redington and Caroline A. (Patten) Mudge. He was born in New York city, on the 22d day of October, 1839. He studied for several years at the private school of Mr. Thomas G. Bradford, at that time a favorite teacher in Boston; and went thence to Harvard College in the summer of 1856, joining the Class of 1860. The most salient point in his college career was, beyond question, his exceeding popularity,—a popularity of an un
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ave you heard anything about the new slave law in Illinois? I think it is much worse than that of 1850. Have you read the Key to uncle Tom's Cabin? It is a collection of all the facts she drew her story from. I've been reading Uncle Tom's Cabin, again lately, and always like it better than before, and see more things in it. I don't see how one man could do much against slavery. In the autumn of 1853 he joined his parents in Italy, where he remained nearly a year, most of the time in Florence. He studied Italian with much diligence, and in July of 1854 he went to Hanover, in order to study German, and also to prepare himself to enter Harvard College on his return to his own country. His parents felt such confidence in his character and habits as to allow him to be his own master while in Germany, and they never had reason to regret it. He learned to write and speak German with fluency, and enjoyed very much the opportunity he found there of hearing good music, of which he was
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
w. Second Lieutenant 24th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), September 2, 1861; first Lieutenant, December 28, 1862; died at Newbern, N. C., May 22, 1864. Nathaniel Saltonstall Barstow, son of Gideon and Nancy (Forrester) Barstow, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, on the 28th of July, 1839. He was the youngest of a large family, which remained in Salem but a few years after his birth, and then went to Detroit, Michigan, where they remained several years. The family returned at length to MassachusSalem but a few years after his birth, and then went to Detroit, Michigan, where they remained several years. The family returned at length to Massachusetts, and resided for some time at Dedham, where he attended the school of Mr. C. J. Capen. He was a bright, sensitive boy, easily ruled through his reason and affections. He was quick at his books, and fond of reading, especially of poetry and ballads. His memory was ready and retentive, and the cultivation it received in childhood made it quite remarkable in after years. He was fitted for college, together with his friend Caspar Crowninshield, by the Rev. Mr. Tenney, at Northfield, and en
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