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Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
hen his men should fight alongside of white soldiers, and show to somebody besides their officers what stuff they were made of, and he accepted it without hesitation. One who was at General Strong's Headquarters at the time writes:— Beaufort, S. C., July 22. General Strong received a letter from Colonel Shaw, in which the desire was expressed for the transfer of the Fifty-fourth to General Strong's brigade. So when the troops were brought away from James Island, General Strong tookde forward to join his regiment. As he was leaving, he turned back and gave me his letters and other papers, telling me to keep them and forward them to his father if anything occurred. Later the Surgeon of the regiment writes:— Beaufort, S. C., August 1. Every day adds to the great loss we have had, and we miss the controlling and really leading person in the regiment, for he was indeed the head; brave, careful, just, conscientious, and thoughtful. He had won the respect and a
Andover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
s born at Lowell, Massachusetts, on the 29th of September, 1840, and was the eighth in descent from George Abbott, who, forced by religious scruples and the troubles of the times, emigrated from Yorkshire, England, in 1643, and settled in Andover, Massachusetts. Edward's mother was the daughter of Edmund St. Loe Livermore, Judge of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire. Judge Livermore was several times a member of Congress from Massachusetts, and was the son of Hon. Samuel Livermore, King's Attorood and youth were passed in his native town, and at its High School he began to fit for college, in the year 1852. For the six months immediately preceding the college examination, however, he pursued his studies at Phillips Academy, in Andover, Massachusetts, and was admitted to the Freshman Class in the summer of 1856. In college his few intimates soon learned to appreciate the quiet strength of his character, and counted upon his native shrewdness and good sense as promises of profession
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ng which others were obliged occasionally to seek, during those terrible weeks, was a proof of his physical vigor, until then undiminished. His first battle was that of Antietam. After that conflict the Second Massachusetts was encamped on Maryland Heights. Here, having had no chance to become gradually acclimated, he was attacked with a slow malarious fever. This sickness took him from active duty for a few weeks, most of which he spent as a convalescent at Frederick. He returned to his pogo to Washington, where they will be put in metallic coffins. I took a lock of hair from each one to send to their friends. It took almost all night to get them ready for transportation. After the battle of Antietam he writes:— Maryland Heights, September 21, 1862. Dear father,—. . . . We left Frederick on the 14th instant, marched that day and the next to Boonsborough, passing through a gap in the mountain where Burnside had had a fight the day before. On the 16th our corps,
Northfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
h to Massachusetts, and resided for some time at Dedham, where he attended the school of Mr. C. J. Capen. He was a bright, sensitive boy, easily ruled through his reason and affections. He was quick at his books, and fond of reading, especially of poetry and ballads. His memory was ready and retentive, and the cultivation it received in childhood made it quite remarkable in after years. He was fitted for college, together with his friend Caspar Crowninshield, by the Rev. Mr. Tenney, at Northfield, and entered in July, 1856. He remained at the University until January 19th, 1858, when he took up his connections and received an honorable discharge. He soon after studied some months at Stockbridge, with the Rev. S. P. Parker, having some intention of rejoining the University, which purpose he never carried out. At college he took no high standing, but imbibed a taste for historical, philosophical, and even theological reading which was somewhat remarkable for a youth of his years.
West Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
. This company was mustered into service for three years, and assigned to the Second Massachusetts Volunteers (Infantry). They went into camp at Brook Farm, West Roxbury, on May 11th, eight days after the President's first call for three years volunteers. This company being the first to arrive, Captain Abbott took command of t easy access to those opportunities of rural sport which an enterprising, spirited boy is always eager to improve. The woods, hills, and pastures of Nonantum, West Roxbury, and Longwood, the waters of Jamaica Pond, Charles River, and Boston Harbor, gave ample scope for a love, which in him was very strong, for adventurous excursi easily led, but never to be driven. At a very early age he was sent to the school of Miss Mary Peabody (now Mrs. Horace Mann); then to that of Miss Cabot, in West Roxbury; and finally to that of Mr. William P. Atkinson, with whom he began the Latin Grammar. When he was nine years old, his parents removed to Staten Island, where
Fordham (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
quite clear to his conscience that his naughty wish had not something to do with his teacher's death. After this, in accordance with the judgment of his parents and with his own consent, he was sent from home to school at St. John's College, at Fordham, near New York. How he fared there extracts from some of his own weekly letters shall show, beginning with one written on his return to school, after a short visit home:— Fordham, June 3, 1850. dear mother,—I got here safe and soFordham, June 3, 1850. dear mother,—I got here safe and sound, and have n't felt hungry yet, though it is not far from supper-time. I wish you had n't sent me here while you are on the island, because I want to be there; and now I shall have to stay up at this old place. I'm sure I sha'n't want to come here after vacation, for I hate it like everything. We forgot to carry that accordion to be mended this morning. I wish I did n't feel this way every time I go home. The boys that were homesick when they first came here are not so now, even that li<
Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ols. (Infantry), September 2, 1861; first Lieutenant, December 28, 1862; died at Newbern, N. C., May 22, 1864. Nathaniel Saltonstall Barstow, son of Gideon and Nancy (Forrester) Barstow, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, on the 28th of July, 1839. He was the youngest of a large family, which remained in Salem but a few years after his birth, and then went to Detroit, Michigan, where they remained several years. The family returned at length to Massachusetts, and resided for some time at Dedham, where he attended the school of Mr. C. J. Capen. He was a bright, sensitive boy, easily ruled through his reason and affections. He was quick at his books, and fond of reading, especially of poetry and ballads. His memory was ready and retentive, and the cultivation it received in childhood made it quite remarkable in after years. He was fitted for college, together with his friend Caspar Crowninshield, by the Rev. Mr. Tenney, at Northfield, and entered in July, 1856. He remained at th
Jamaica Plain (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ers, who still survive, and two sons, Warren and Francis, who both gave their lives for their country. Excepting this irretrievable bereavement, the boyhood of Lieutenant Russell had no marked event. The first school he attended was kept by Mr. T. Russell Sullivan in Boston, under the Park Street Church. After the death of his mother and the removal of his home from Boston to Nonantum, a portion of the town of Newton, he was placed at the boarding-school of Mr. Cornelius M. Vinson, at Jamaica Plain. But his final preparation for college, made after his father's removal to Longwood, was accomplished under the tuition of Mr. Thomas G. Bradford, a teacher of high repute in Boston. He entered Harvard College in the year 1856, with the class that graduated in 1860, and remained there till the end of the Freshman year, then took up his connections at Harvard and entered college again at Amherst. He had been at Amherst, however, only a few months, when he decided not to complete a co
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
, who, forced by religious scruples and the troubles of the times, emigrated from Yorkshire, England, in 1643, and settled in Andover, Massachusetts. Edward's mother was the daughter of Edmund St. Loe Livermore, Judge of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire. Judge Livermore was several times a member of Congress from Massachusetts, and was the son of Hon. Samuel Livermore, King's Attorney in New Hampshire before the Revolution, and afterwards first United States Senator from that State. As a New Hampshire before the Revolution, and afterwards first United States Senator from that State. As a boy Edward was active, sprightly, and high-spirited, of quick intellect, full of playfulness and life, and early manifested a more than usual fondness for all muscular sports and exercises. His activity, says one who knew him from infancy to manhood, suggested the idea of perpetual motion, and was the occasion to him of frequent bruises and broken limbs. With this exuberant vivacity and this passion for muscular superiority, there was united a great love of reading, especially works of imagin
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
them to do their best. There is some rumor to-night of our being ordered to James Island, and put under General Terry's command. I should be satisfied with that. James Island, July 16. . . . . You don't know what a fortunate day this has been for me, and for us all, excepting some poor fellows who were killed and woundedence in us. Cole's Island (opposite Folly Island), July 17, 4 P. M. James Island was evacuated last night by our forces. My regiment started first, at half urth to General Strong's brigade. So when the troops were brought away from James Island, General Strong took this regiment under his command. It left James Island James Island on Thursday, July 16, at nine P. M., and marched to Cole's Island, which they reached at four o'clock on Friday morning, marching all night, most of the way in singlehad also great reason to be proud of his regiment, and their good conduct on James Island showed for the first time their quality as soldiers. They showed, he though
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