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Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ing to be in the history of the world, if the Emancipation Proclamation is really what we hope it is. At any rate, it must be an eventful one for our country, even if nothing decisive takes place. Early in 1863, when the government determined to form negro regiments, Governor Andrew offered him, by the following letter, the colonelcy of one to be raised in Massachusetts; being the first recruited under State authority, although one was already in service in South Carolina and another in Kansas. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Department, Boston, January 30, 1863. Captain Robert G. Shaw, Second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Captain,—I am about to organize in Massachusetts a colored regiment as part of the volunteer quota of this State,—the commissioned officers to be white men. I have to-day written to your father, expressing to him my sense of the importance of this undertaking, and requesting him to forward to you this letter, in which I offer t
Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
tness of this farewell note. His descriptions of the famous march from Annapolis are very graphic, but must be omitted for want of room. The call for the Seventh Regiment extending only to thirty days, he applied for and obtained a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts, and left with that regiment for the seat of war in July, 1861. The following extract will give a glimpse at his first year's life in camp:— guard-tent, Second regiment, camp Hicks, near Frederick, Md., 3 1/2 A. M., Dec. 25, 1861. dearest mother,—It is Christmas morning, and I hope it will be a happy and merry one for you all, though it looks so stormy for our poor country one can hardly be in a merry humor. I should be very sorry to have a war with England, even if we had a fine army, instead of a pack of politicians for officers, with their constituents for rank and file; and all the more so, of course, thinking that we shall have to take many whoppings before we are worth
Amherst (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
a teacher of high repute in Boston. He entered Harvard College in the year 1856, with the class that graduated in 1860, and remained there till the end of the Freshman year, then took up his connections at Harvard and entered college again at Amherst. He had been at Amherst, however, only a few months, when he decided not to complete a collegiate course, but to enter at once upon the study of the law, which he had already chosen as his profession. He read in the elementary text-books for Amherst, however, only a few months, when he decided not to complete a collegiate course, but to enter at once upon the study of the law, which he had already chosen as his profession. He read in the elementary text-books for a while at home. Then for about a year and a half he continued his studies with the writer at his office in Boston, until the fall of 1860, when he entered the Law School at Cambridge, and remained there until he had determined to join the Army of the Union. Though born in the city, and for some years attending Boston schools, his life was mainly passed in the country, or within easy access to those opportunities of rural sport which an enterprising, spirited boy is always eager to improve.
Poolesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
enant came into command of his company before he had been many weeks in the field; and by a singular chain of circumstances, he was never transferred from it, and continued to command it till he became Major of the regiment. In camp at Poolesville, Maryland, where his regiment passed the winter of 1861-62, Lieutenant Abbott was distinguished for regularity, and precision in the discharge of his duties, for attentive care of his men, and for promptness and accuracy in every matter of battalio its organization at Lynnfield in August, 1861, and was made a Corporal in Company F. In September, 1861, he was detailed as a clerk at the Headquarters of Brigadier-General F. W. Lander, commanding a brigade in the Corps of Observation, Poolesville, Maryland. On or about November 1st he was appointed Sergeant-Major of his regiment, and returned to duty with it. He subsequently passed with his regiment through fourteen battles and skirmishes, without receiving a wound; and the hard activities
St. Peter (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
e cook of Hortense Beauharnais, Louis Napoleon's mother, illuminated his windows, and painted on them, Vive Napoldeon III. Then the Republicans got together and broke all his windows. I suppose you know that Louis Napoleon has had seven million votes, and will soon be crowned Emperor. He has liberated Abd-el- Kader and has sent him to Brousse, on condition that he would go no more into Algiers. He, Abd-el-Kader, is so grateful that he has asked leave to vote for Napoleon. Do you like St. Peter's as well as the Cathedral at Milan? Neuchatel, August 7, 1853. I've just been eating a little bit of boiled dog, and it was n't at all bad, only a little tough. I suppose he was rather old. A puppy would be better. Have you heard anything about the new slave law in Illinois? I think it is much worse than that of 1850. Have you read the Key to uncle Tom's Cabin? It is a collection of all the facts she drew her story from. I've been reading Uncle Tom's Cabin, again lately, a
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
rst Lieutenant, December 28, 1862; died at Newbern, N. C., May 22, 1864. Nathaniel Saltonstall Baland General Burnside and the fleet turned to Newbern, which was captured after a brisk engagement.ll redoubt on the side of the Neuse, opposite Newbern, garrisoned by some hundred men, was attackedhort visits at home, he continued in and near Newbern until that fatal disease, which had already tfered positions at other places, continued at Newbern, fated soon to become a city of the dead undet. Among the volumes of a deserted library at Newbern he came upon Napier's Peninsular War, and he negro-woman, with whom he sometimes lodged in Newbern, as she told of him and his ways. He had scaiment, and take passage down the Roanoke, for Newbern, in a gunboat. I can recall with perfect disc speech of his. His company, on returning to Newbern after their first expedition, found their cam the latter part of that month he sailed from Newbern for Boston. After a preparation of some ten
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
rse than that of 1850. Have you read the Key to uncle Tom's Cabin? It is a collection of all the facts she drew her story from. I've been reading Uncle Tom's Cabin, again lately, and always like it better than before, and see more things in it. I don't see how one man could do much against slavery. In the autumn of 1853 he joined his parents in Italy, where he remained nearly a year, most of the time in Florence. He studied Italian with much diligence, and in July of 1854 he went to Hanover, in order to study German, and also to prepare himself to enter Harvard College on his return to his own country. His parents felt such confidence in his character and habits as to allow him to be his own master while in Germany, and they never had reason to regret it. He learned to write and speak German with fluency, and enjoyed very much the opportunity he found there of hearing good music, of which he was very fond. His letters show the innocent and youthful zest with which he engaged
Christmas (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
c,—it must have been horrible! I thought how we should feel if father had been in her. Do you understand why some people have so much to suffer during their lives, and others are always happy? I mean the relatives, more than the people themselves who were lost. It must be dreadful to be expecting your friends and instead of them, to get news that they are dead! What a moment it must have been for those on board just before the vessel went down! Previous to a visit to Paris, to pass Christmas, he writes:— Will you please take particular notice in the streets, and see if chaps (I can't say young men, and boys won't do at all) of my age wear hats or caps? If hats are the fashion, I shall come with a leather hat-box like father's! After going to a fancy ball in female attire, he writes, February, 1855:— It's really true that everybody at the ball thought I was a lady until I spoke in my own voice; then it was very funny to see their astonishment. I was introduce<
Neuchatel (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 27
or Europe with all the family. After passing a happy summer in Switzerland, he was left at the school of M. Roulet, in Neuchatel, where he remained two years. During this time he was very happy. After the custom of Swiss schools, he made many excu il avait deja su, si jeune, se faire remarquer par ses riches qualityes. A few extracts from his own letters from Neuchatel will show something of his life there. Neuchatel, November, 1852. Dear mother,—I was just going to put a leNeuchatel, November, 1852. Dear mother,—I was just going to put a letter to father in the post, when I got yours. At the end of this lake there is a great deal of low country, which is generally overflowed every autumn; but this year it has been under water three times, and the inhabitants of the villages in the neo grateful that he has asked leave to vote for Napoleon. Do you like St. Peter's as well as the Cathedral at Milan? Neuchatel, August 7, 1853. I've just been eating a little bit of boiled dog, and it was n't at all bad, only a little tough.
Yorkshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 27
1860. Edward Gardner Abbott. Captain 2d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), May 24, 1861; Brevet Major, August 9, 1862; killed at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. Edward Gardner Abbott, eldest son of Hon. Josiah Gardner and Caroline (Livermore) Abbott, was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, on the 29th of September, 1840, and was the eighth in descent from George Abbott, who, forced by religious scruples and the troubles of the times, emigrated from Yorkshire, England, in 1643, and settled in Andover, Massachusetts. Edward's mother was the daughter of Edmund St. Loe Livermore, Judge of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire. Judge Livermore was several times a member of Congress from Massachusetts, and was the son of Hon. Samuel Livermore, King's Attorney in New Hampshire before the Revolution, and afterwards first United States Senator from that State. As a boy Edward was active, sprightly, and high-spirited, of quick intellect, full of playfulness and life, and early manifested a m
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