hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 258 total hits in 79 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Belem (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12
Lisbon is, in its situation and external appearance, a most beautiful city. The opening into the ocean, the splendid bosom of the Tagus, which here stretches to the breadth of twelve miles and then is contracted again by the precipices below Belem to a comparatively narrow, rapid stream; the multitude of ships crowded together by the amphitheatre of hills; and the city, which, springing from the water's edge, rises with its beautiful white houses and towers, and is crowned behind by the hebesides the extreme filthiness of the streets, there is little either curious, interesting, or beautiful in the buildings and architecture. . . . . The only building that has anything like a classical interest is the fine convent and church at Belem, an immense building or rather mass of buildings, erected about 1497, in a singular style, between Gothic and Arabic, by the famous Dom Manuel, to commemorate the successful accomplishment of the great voyage of Vasco de Gama. It was from this s
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 12
etc., and especially of an amphitheatre and some mosaics, of which La Borde has given a detailed and interesting description, with a history of the city down to its final fall in the sixth century, in a folio volume published some years since at Paris. Everything, however, is neglected. The amphitheatre even is falling in every year; the mosaics, as I absolutely saw, are a part of a sheepfold, and, of course, more and more broken up every day; and the only person, I believe, who takes any invale of Alcantara, just before it enters the city; and here it altogether exceeds everything I have seen, even the Pont du Gard, which is more remarkable than the aqueducts about Rome. The length of it here is more than two thousand four hundred Paris feet, and it passes on thirty-five enormous arches, springing from the depths of the valley and going boldly up to the top, of which the one in the centre is one hundred and seven feet eight inches wide and two hundred and thirty feet ten inches
San Isidro (Argentina) (search for this): chapter 12
no common note; while, at the same time, the circumstance that there are curious Roman ruins in the neighborhood, and that in the sixteenth century it was the capital seat of the genuine Spanish school in painting, increase its claims and its interest until, I am hardly disposed to doubt, they are unrivalled in Spain. To begin, then, with the oldest. You pass out of Seville by the Faubourg Triana,—which is a corruption of Traiana,—and, after stopping an instant at the fine Convent of San Isidro del Campo to see the tomb of that Alfonso Perez de Guzman who gave a new escutcheon to the family of Medina Sidonia by the sacrifice of his son at the siege of Tarifa, you find on the right bank of the Guadalquivir, a league from the city, the extensive ruins of Italica. It was certainly the native place of Trajan and Silius Italicus, and may have given birth to Hadrian and Theodosius, for it seems hardly probable that the favor of one emperor could have spread out so large a city as the
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12
find myself to have been long in coming to the borders of Portugal. There I bade farewell to the only country in the world ntry-house, and there they are not properly built; but in Portugal I have found them everywhere,—a magnificent one with a fibe known in this little kingdom, I would rather travel in Portugal than in Spain, though my guides, with true Spanish exclusrtuguese achievements,—see Lusiad, IV. 87, and X. 12,—for Portugal has never produced so great an effect on the world as by cards—the only, the universal, the unvarying amusement in Portugal—came in; but in this house alone I found enough who wouldhe most distinguished and the most extraordinary woman in Portugal. She is daughter of the Duke of Luxembourg, and married amily of the Duke of Wellington, had the only dukedoms in Portugal. . . . The name of Cadaval is the great name in PortugPortugal, and the people already look to it, as they did to the name of Braganza in the time of the Philips; and the intention
Colares (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12
, whose magnificence finally closes up the whole prospect. The road passes, I should think, about half-way between the summit and the base, and beginning from the southeastern point, where you first enter, extends round to beyond the village of Colares,—a distance of four or five miles,—cut like a kind of cornice in the side of the mountain, whose windings and indentations it follows, so that the prospect shifts and varies at every step you advance; now hiding you in some sunless little dell,antic, elegant seclusion of that Mr. Beckford whom Lord Byron has justly damned to eternal memory under the name of Vathek; From the story of that name, of which he was the author.—Childe Harold, Canto I. Stanza 22. to the Quinta da Penha, to Colares, and, finally, to the rock which forms the most western limit of the European continent, and where nature, by a glorious boundary, marks the termination of her works in the Old World. Besides this, too, we went, of course, to the Moorish forti<
Lisbon (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12
ol of painting. Sir John Downie. journey to Lisbon with contrabandists. Cintra. Portuguese sociabandists that smuggle dollars from Seville to Lisbon, and in return smuggle back English goods fromists with whom he had travelled came as far as Lisbon, and Mr. Ticknor used to tell the following anr from Bellas, about eleven English miles from Lisbon, and passes frequently under ground, and severalmond trees, is worthy of the neighborhood of Lisbon; while, as you look perpendicularly down, your course, speak with minuteness or assurance of Lisbon. I was there only from October 23 to November covers, and there was generally somebody from Lisbon, or some friends in Cintra, that came in to ocwo or three others, I finished the evening. Lisbon, on my return, seemed cold and inhospitable, fever, that I felt the want of society, even at Lisbon. . . . I knew a good many persons who interestMr. Bell, and two or three other Englishmen in Lisbon, who take an interest in letters. The prece[7 more...]
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 12
, and houses are full of his works. Velasquez, too, was a Sevilian; but he lived and labored at Madrid, and must be sought there in the Palace, and in the Academy of San Fernando; but except him, I b a pleasant family; to the house of the Conde de Arcos, a good-natured gentleman, whom I knew in Madrid; and to the little dances at the Countess de Castillejas, which made a more rational amusement toment reminding me how much worse it was. On the 23d, just five months from the day I entered Madrid for the first time, I reached La Moita on the Tagus, opposite Lisbon, and embarked to cross it. kindness as I received at Cintra is to be replaced by no other. . . . . There is no Prado, as at Madrid, for the Portuguese women are still more restrained than the Spanish; and the public walks whichmiliar; several ecclesiastics, who, by the by, are in general more cultivated than the clergy at Madrid; and several families, both foreigners and Portuguese. Among the last was Mr. Stephens, an old
Estremadura (Spain) (search for this): chapter 12
rid; and to the little dances at the Countess de Castillejas, which made a more rational amusement than I ever met before at a Spanish tertulia. Every day, too, I dined regularly at the Moorish castle, with its chivalrous castellan, Sir John Downie, a frank, vehement Scotchman, who has risen to much favor by his conduct during the last war. He came out first with Sir John Moore, and returned with the expedition; then came out again with Sir Arthur Wellesley, and gained such reputation in Estremadura, that a legion of seven thousand men was collected by the influence of his name, and served under him during the rest of the war with great success. It was there he received the present of Pizarro's sword, from Pizarro's family, which he showed to me, and which I saw with no common interest. This sword, too, has attached to it a story that well shows the chivalrous character of its present possessor. He had it at his side in 1812, when the famous attack was made on Seville, where he co
Serpa (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12
anks of the Chanza. . . . . We had been travelling through a rude, barren country,. . . . but as soon as we had passed the range of hills beyond the Chanza, we found a country always agreeable and often well cultivated; and this continued through Serpa, through the fine vale of the Guadiana, and by Alcacovas to Carvalho. The people, too, seem to have a sense and feeling for this beautiful nature that the Spaniards have not. Since I left Catalonia I have hardly seen a country-house, and there they are not properly built; but in Portugal I have found them everywhere,—a magnificent one with a fine aqueduct at Serpa, many others scattered along the route, and little gardens abounding in fruits, water, and shade, belonging to the better sort of peasantry, of which no trace is to be found in the rest of the Peninsula. As to the character of the people, they have not the Spanish force and decision, but neither have they the Spanish coldness, pride, and obstinacy. They are even polite and
Alcantara (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12
alled either as a conveyance for water or as a specimen of this kind of architecture; for, as antiquity has certainly sent down to us nothing so perfect or so bold, I presume modern times have no competition to offer. It was the work of John V., and was built between 1713 and 1732. It brings the water from Bellas, about eleven English miles from Lisbon, and passes frequently under ground, and several times traverses deep valleys. The most remarkable point is where it crosses the vale of Alcantara, just before it enters the city; and here it altogether exceeds everything I have seen, even the Pont du Gard, which is more remarkable than the aqueducts about Rome. The length of it here is more than two thousand four hundred Paris feet, and it passes on thirty-five enormous arches, springing from the depths of the valley and going boldly up to the top, of which the one in the centre is one hundred and seven feet eight inches wide and two hundred and thirty feet ten inches high,—the ver
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...