hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 454 total hits in 163 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Hatfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Ordes, Bennett, Lord William Russell, etc., etc., besides Counts Palmella and Souza; but those I have described, and who were there often, constituted the proper society at Lord Holland's, and gave it that tone of culture, wit, and good talk without pretension, which make it, as an elegant society, the best I have seen in Europe. It was in this society I spent all the leisure time I had while I was in London. Two days I passed very pleasantly at the Marquess of Salisbury's. He lives at Hatfield, Herts., in a fine establishment, once a residence of James I., and built by him; though a part of it is older, and contains the room where Elizabeth was imprisoned by her sister Mary, and wrote the verses that still remain to us. It is surrounded by a large park, full of venerable oaks, and is a kind of old baronial seat, which well suits with the species of hospitality exercised there. The long gallery is a grand, solemn hall, which, with its ornaments, carries the imagination at once ba
e, and whose unfinished magnificence shows how suddenly this power was broken up. York is as grand and imposing as almost any of them, I think, unless it be that at Seville, where there is a solemn harmony between the dim light that struggles through its storied windows, the dark, threatening masses of the pile itself, the imposing power of the paintings,. . . . and the deep, wailing echoes of that worship which is to be found and felt, in all its original dignity and power, only beyond the Pyrenees. . . . Excepting that, I know nothing that goes before York. . . . . The next point that surprised me was Newcastle. I merely passed the night there,. . . . but the appearance of the country about it was extraordinary. At the side of every coal-pit a quantity of the finer parts that are thrown out is perpetually burning, and the effect produced by the earth, thus apparently everywhere on fire, both on the machinery used and the men busied with it, was horrible. It seemed as if I were
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 13
o anything with Reynouard and the Provencal; but as soon as I have finished my Spanish and Portuguese researches, I shall begin here. It is a melancholy fact, which I am sure will not a little strike you, that, after having been four months at Madrid and one at Lisbon, besides my journeys to the great cities of Andalusia, I should be at last obliged to come back to Paris, to find books and means neither Spain nor Portugal would afford me. But so it is, and I have at this moment on my table siing my hurried life in Paris, at that period. On both the occasions referred to, I met Mons. de Talleyrand at the hotel of the Duchess de Duras, to whom I was presented by a letter from the Duc Adrien de Montmorency Laval, French ambassador in Madrid, in such a way that, from the first, she received me with great kindness and permitted me to visit her familiarly. She received a great deal of company, but her favorite time for seeing her friends without ceremony was between four and six,—what
Lisbon (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 13: Voyage from Lisbon to Falmouth. immediate departure for Paris. society. Talleyrand. return to London. Lord Holland. Sir J. MacKINTOSHintosh. John Allen. Lord Brougham. Hatfield. Woburn. Cambridge. To Mr. Eli. The first thing I asked for was, of course, my letters. . . . . None are so late as the one I received from you at Lisbon, just before I left;. . . . still I am extremely anxious to receive later accounts, which will tell me the effect cold wea melancholy fact, which I am sure will not a little strike you, that, after having been four months at Madrid and one at Lisbon, besides my journeys to the great cities of Andalusia, I should be at last obliged to come back to Paris, to find books a understood their literatures than they do themselves: while, at the same time, his books left in France, in Gallicia, at Lisbon, and two or three places in England; his manuscripts, neglected and lost to himself; his manners, lazy and careless; and
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
avoid it I had only to talk to some one else Lady Holland was polite and even kind in after years to Mr. Ticknor, who used to attribute it to a little passage of arms that once occurred between them. She characteristically remarked to him, that she believed New England was originally colonized by convicts, sent over from the mother country. Mr. Ticknor replied that he was not aware of it, but said he knew that some of the Vassall family—ancestors of Lady Holland—had settled early in Massachusetts, where a house built by one of them was standing in Cambridge, and a marble monument to a member of the family was to be seen in King's Chapel, Boston. Lady Holland was, for a moment, surprised into silence; then questioned him about the monument, and asked him to send her a drawing of it, which he did. . Lord Holland is an open-hearted gentleman, kind, simple, and hospitable, a scholar with few prejudices, and making no pretensions, either on the score of his rank, his fortune, his fam
Ludgate hill (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
me like lightning, or looked upon my map, and saw the whole land so intersected with roads and canals that it looked like an anatomy, my head has grown giddy with the vain effort to trace out a comparison with the country I had just left, and account, even partially, for the overwhelming difference. . . . . Yesterday morning I came early to Bath,. . . . and at five in the evening took my seat in the mail-coach, which, this morning at eight, landed me safely in the London Coffee-House, Ludgate Hill, without the least curiosity to see the great show of the queen's funeral, which all the city has gone out in the mud and fog to gaze at. Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. The first thing I asked for was, of course, my letters. . . . . None are so late as the one I received from you at Lisbon, just before I left;. . . . still I am extremely anxious to receive later accounts, which will tell me the effect cold weather may have produced on my mother's very feeble health. I sha
Lisbon, Grafton County, New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
alleyrand. return to London. Lord Holland. Sir J. MacKINTOSHintosh. John Allen. Lord Brougham. Hatfield. Woburn. Cambridge. To Mr. Elisha Ticknor. Lisbon, November 4, 1818. . . . . Your letter, my dear father, has much alarmed me about my mother. . . . I pray you to speak on this subject with perfect plainness tember 13. Yesterday I received, my dearest father, yours of September 30. I cannot tell you what a consolation it was to me to hear that my mother is better. Lisbon itself looks brighter with my brightened thoughts, and even the sad, rainy weather is less tiresome. I hope a packet will sail the 16th. If it does, I shall set off at once. To Mr. Elisha Ticknor. London, December 2, 1818. I wrote to you, dearest father and mother, on the 20th of last month, from Lisbon. The day after, I sailed in the packet and came to anchor in Falmouth Harbor on the evening of the 28th;. . . . and as I once more put my foot upon kindred ground, I could have fa
Ramsgate (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
ies', where I dined with Humboldt, Lafayette, and De Pradt the same evening, and who would have enjoyed it prodigiously. But the first house at which I dined in England was Lord Holland's, where I met Tierney, Mackintosh, and some other of the leading Whigs, to whom I told it amidst great laughter. Two or three times afterwards, when I met Sir James Mackintosh, he spoke of Talleyrand, and always called him le petit moyen. Journal. On the 18th of January, 1819, I came to London [from Ramsgate], by the way of Canterbury, getting thus a view of the agricultural prospects in the county of Kent, and struck for the third time with the bustle which, from so far, announces the traveller's approach to the largest and most active capital in Europe. . . . . I went to see the kind and respectable Sir Joseph Banks several times, and renewed my acquaintance with the Marquess of Lansdowne, passed a night with my excellent friend Mr. Vaughan, etc. . . . . I found here, too, Count Funchal,.
Bedford (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
gives every winter, in compliance with ancient usage, to the respectable families in the county, besides being at home, as it is called, one evening in every week to any who are disposed to come and dance without show or ceremony. . . . . The evening to me was delightful. I liked this sort of hospitality, which is made to embrace a whole county. The next morning I came back to London,. . . . and the following day early set off for the North. I went, however, at first, no farther than Bedfordshire, where I passed three days at the splendid seat of the Duke of Bedford. The entrance to Woburn Abbey is by a Roman gateway opening into the park, through which you are conducted, by an avenue of venerable elms, through fine varieties of hill and dale, woodland and pasture, and by the side of streamlets and little lakes, above three miles. . . . . I arrived late in the afternoon. . . . . At half past 6 Lord John Russell, who had just returned from shooting, made me a visit, and carried m
Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
embrace a whole county. The next morning I came back to London,. . . . and the following day early set off for the North. I went, however, at first, no farther than Bedfordshire, where I passed three days at the splendid seat of the Duke of Bedford. The entrance to Woburn Abbey is by a Roman gateway opening into the park, through which you are conducted, by an avenue of venerable elms, through fine varieties of hill and dale, woodland and pasture, and by the side of streamlets and little fish-ponds, greenhouses, the gardens, tennis-court, riding-school, etc., and a gallery containing a few antiques that are curious, especially the immense Lanti vase, which has been much talked about, and well deserves it. . . . . The Duke of Bedford is now about fifty-five, a plain, unpretending man in his manner, reserved in society, but talking well when alone, and respectable in debate in the House of Peers; a great admirer of the fine arts, which he patronizes liberally; and, finally, o
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...