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Coppet (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 15
ser l'atlantique; et que vous n'oublierez pas des amis, qui vous sont bien tendrement attaches. In 1825 the following interesting letter came from him, written in English, so nearly perfect that it is given here exactly from the autograph. Coppet, August 10, 1825. my dear Ticknor,—It is an object of most sincere regret to me, that it was not in my power to be of any use to your friends in Paris, and to express to them the gratitude and friendship which I feel for you. Your kind letter anagement of public affairs. I am here alone this summer. Broglie and my sister are at their place in Normandy, where I shall join them in the autumn, after a little journey to the south of France. Next year, if God permits, we shall all be at Coppet. Pray come and see us. I cannot reconcile myself to the idea that you should not pay us another visit; and my constitution suffers so much from a sea voyage, that I have but little hopes of seeing America, though it be one of my most earnest des
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): chapter 15
America—when she gets rid of the Brazilian Emperor, which is only an unnecessary piece of ridicule—will present an unexampled scene of grandeur, wealth, and reason. But for God's sake keep your eyes open upon your slave States. I am sadly struck with the madness of the people of Georgia; and prudence unites with common sense, justice, and religion to recommend that some early steps should be made towards the abolition of slavery. I live in the daily expectation to hear that the fate of St. Domingo has extended to the whole of the West Indies. And what will become of your Southern States, and their slaves, when there is an African empire established in the West, which will be but a just compensation for all the cruelties which the negroes have suffered from the Europeans, for years and ages. Let your statesmen act and speak; your philosophers advise; your ministers preach upon this subject. Delenda est Carthago. What should I tell you of our own politics? They are so shabby a
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rs written by the Ex-President to Mr. Ticknor. Those from the Duke de Laval, from Cesare Balbo, Madame de Broglie, and Auguste de Stael are interesting in themselves, and full of vivacity; and they bear still more the marks of that individuality, on both sides, which creates the living element in any correspondence that is worth preserving. These friendships overmastered time and separation, as will be seen in later portions of these volumes. From Mr. Jefferson. Poplar Forest, near Lynchburg, November 25, 1817. dear Sir: Your favor of August 14 was delivered to me as I was setting out for the distant possession from which I now write, and to which I pay frequent and long visits. On my arrival here, I make it my first duty to write the letter you request to Mr. Erving, and to enclose it in this, under cover to your father, that you may get it in time. My letters are always letters of thanks, because you are always furnishing occasion for them. I am very glad you have bee
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 15
25, 1818. dear Sir: I received, two days ago, your favor of August 10, from Madrid, and sincerely regret that my letter to Cardinal Dugnani did not reach you at Rmy constant and sincere attachment. th. Jefferson. From the Duke de Laval. Madrid, 18 Novembre, 1818. Translation: I answer your very kind letter of theattent avec une égale ardeur, et de grands talents. From the Duke de Laval. Madrid, 18 Janvier, 1819. Translation: You no more doubt the interest your leh together in Turin, and in Paris two years later. From Count Cesare Balbo. Madrid, 12 October, 1818. Translated from the Italian.To-day, before the time, onn, of the pleasure I take in the hope you give me of your passing again through Madrid. I no longer hope, I say, that I can accompany you, but I cling to the hope—int, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr. Serve the King. From Count Cesare Balbo. Madrid, 15 April, 1819. Translated from the Italian.Yesterday evening I was told,
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 15
at political quarrels become private quarrels. It does not make Paris gay. All else continues the same, the salons as you saw them, much vanity, little feeling. Victor, Auguste, Miss Randall, all of them think of you. You won all our hearts. I do not know whether you have vanity enough to be pleased with the general success that you had here. Indeed, you have more pride than vanity, as we told you. Do not forget my American books. Tell me something about the religious condition of Scotland, and England. You know that is a subject which interests me, but I promise not to mingle mystery with it. Tell me, too, whether people talk to you of my mother's work.Je vous assure que je regrette beaucoup vos petites visites, à cinq heures. Je suis fachee d'avoir concu tant d'affection pour un sauvage de l'orinoque, qui ne nous rejoindra peut-être jamais. Qui sait si les revolutions ne nous ameneront pas dans votre tranquille et beau pays. Je ne vous parlerai pas de notre politique, q
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
tter to him which contained it was found among his papers. The enclosed letter, however, never left this continent, but was found many years afterwards in the garret of an old house in Plymouth, Massachusetts, among a mass of ship-papers, log-books, etc., etc. The owner of the house formerly owned sailing vessels, and two of his brothers were sea-captains, one of whom sailed to the Mediterranean. In 1864 Mr. Ticknor received a letter from Troy, New York, addressed to him by a lady born in Plymouth, who offered to send him Mr. Jefferson's letter to the Cardinal, which she had found among some autographs in her possession, and of which she had traced the history as above. She thought he ought to have the letter, because it concluded with a very high compliment to him. Mr. Ticknor was much pleased by this little incident, accepted the letter, and sent the lady a copy of the handsome quarto edition of his Life of Prescott, then just published. The fate of the letter was never further e
Accomack (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
. Monticello, October 25, 1818. dear Sir: I received, two days ago, your favor of August 10, from Madrid, and sincerely regret that my letter to Cardinal Dugnani did not reach you at Rome. The letter to Cardinal Dugnani had a curious history. It must have reached Mr. Elisha Ticknor, for the letter to him which contained it was found among his papers. The enclosed letter, however, never left this continent, but was found many years afterwards in the garret of an old house in Plymouth, Massachusetts, among a mass of ship-papers, log-books, etc., etc. The owner of the house formerly owned sailing vessels, and two of his brothers were sea-captains, one of whom sailed to the Mediterranean. In 1864 Mr. Ticknor received a letter from Troy, New York, addressed to him by a lady born in Plymouth, who offered to send him Mr. Jefferson's letter to the Cardinal, which she had found among some autographs in her possession, and of which she had traced the history as above. She thought he
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ey met like brothers, and were much together in Turin, and in Paris two years later. From Count Cesare Balbo. Madrid, 12 October, 1818. Translated from the Italian.To-day, before the time, on Monday morning, I receive your letter from Gibraltar, and I thank Heaven, this time, that I am not capable of controlling my occupations and my hours as you do, otherwise I should be forced to wait seven days for a pleasure which I do not wish to defer a moment,—that of answering you. I never madat such a sea might not divide us, or that you should consent to the wishes of your father; but I must perforce admit that you are right in not desiring this our trade, more infernal—whatever you may say —than the five hundred mouths of fire at Gibraltar. You have always seen in me this same love of the diplomacy; but since your departure I have had new reasons for abhorring it. . . . . You may judge, then, if I was pleased by the news you gave me of the arrival of the Countess di Teba. I do <
Troy, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
must have reached Mr. Elisha Ticknor, for the letter to him which contained it was found among his papers. The enclosed letter, however, never left this continent, but was found many years afterwards in the garret of an old house in Plymouth, Massachusetts, among a mass of ship-papers, log-books, etc., etc. The owner of the house formerly owned sailing vessels, and two of his brothers were sea-captains, one of whom sailed to the Mediterranean. In 1864 Mr. Ticknor received a letter from Troy, New York, addressed to him by a lady born in Plymouth, who offered to send him Mr. Jefferson's letter to the Cardinal, which she had found among some autographs in her possession, and of which she had traced the history as above. She thought he ought to have the letter, because it concluded with a very high compliment to him. Mr. Ticknor was much pleased by this little incident, accepted the letter, and sent the lady a copy of the handsome quarto edition of his Life of Prescott, then just publis
Cluses (France) (search for this): chapter 15
e from our intellectual stupor. In my humble sphere, I have just published a volume of Letters on England, which will be sent to you from Paris. These, and some other of M. de Stael's writings, were collected after his death, forming three volumes, with a biographical notice of him, written by his sister. In this short memoir is a remarkable account given by him, in a letter to his mother, of an interview he had, when he was but seventeen years old, with Napoleon I., whom he sought in Savoy, as he passed through, and pleaded with him for his mother, then exiled from Paris and persecuted by the Emperor. I am told it has' brought some practical ideas of liberty in circulation, which will perhaps induce me to write another volume. In the mean time, I am very busy with farming, without the slightest wish, for my friends or myself, to have any share in the management of public affairs. I am here alone this summer. Broglie and my sister are at their place in Normandy, where I shal
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