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Hamburg (Hamburg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
was tutor to some small prince, and probably when he had educated him he would be his Prime Minister. I made his acquaintance and delivered my message. Before I left home I had made several attempts to read Dante, and found it not only difficult to get a copy, but impossible to get help in reading. Balhorn knew everything about Dante. He was not fully occupied, but he could not be hired,—he was too well off to be paid in money. A brother of my friend Mr. James Savage had sent me from Hamburg a box of very fine Havana cigars, and I found that Herr Balhorn would read and explain Dante to me, and consider some of those fine cigars—so rare in Germany—a full compensation; and he continued the reading, certainly as long as the cigars lasted. Mr. B. was a lawyer,—an upright, strong man,—and he was virtually promised, that, if he would superintend the education of the young princes of Lippe, he should have the place of Chancellor of their little principality when it was completed;
Cassel (Hesse, Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
ignorant of the disaffection in Gottingen, or that it will escape unpunished. You flatter yourselves that I shall lose my throne, but you are mistaken. As long as my brother sits on the throne of France, so long I shall be your king, and I will use my power to punish your ingratitude. The University shall be remodelled,—it shall be a French University. I will have French professors,—men of virtue and patriotism, etc., etc. After a considerable tirade like this, his Majesty returned to Cassel, and Eichhorn, in the next number of the University's Review,—which he conducts,—gave a side-blow at the never-to-be-forgotten speech of his Most Gracious, etc., for which, but that the Cossacks stopped all heart-burnings a week later, he might have lost his head. This is the only time the privileges of the University have been in danger, and Jerome was such a weak and uncertain little blockhead that he would probably never have had resolution and constancy enough to execute his threat.
Westphalia (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
istinguished men in Europe. To Mr. Elisha Ticknor, Boston. Gottingen, August 10, 1815. Well, my dear father, here I am regularly settled in my own lodgings, and regularly matriculated as a member of the University of Gottingen; and the first and pleasantest use I can make of my new apartments and privileges is to sit down and give you an account of them. . . . . The town itself, as you know, is now within the dominions of Hanover, and was formerly just comprehended within that of Westphalia. It is an old town, and all the houses I have observed are old, though evidently comfortable and neat, and quite filled with tenants from all quarters of the world. The whole town was originally surrounded with pretty strong walls; but they are now in ruins, and serve only as the foundation of a public walk, shaded with fine trees, which extends round the city. The number of inhabitants is about ten thousand, and, as far as I have come in contact with them during the last three days, I
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
er way fulfilled the commands of the Regency. Being rather weary after six weeks of constant study, Mr. Ticknor and Mr. Everett made a visit of five days to Hanover, leaving Gottingen September 19th, and returning the 24th, and found much interest in making the acquaintance of Feder,— for twenty-nine years professor in Gottingen,—Count Munster, Minister of State, Professor Martens, author of a work on the Law of Nations, much read in America, and Mad. Kestner, the original of Goethe's Charlotte. The following are passages from his journal in Hanover:— Hanover, September 20, 1815.—This morning I called on Count Munster, Minister of State for Hanover. I found him a man of about forty-five, well-built, tall, and genteel. He speaks English like a native, and though his conversation was not very acute, it was discursive and pleasant. I remained with him only a few moments, as there were several persons in waiting when I was admitted, whose business was much more important, I
Germany (Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
he was now enjoying. He saw men around him, his contemporaries, not superior to him in capacity or industry, but far beyond him in extent and accuracy of knowledge, and he could not but recall with a bitter pang the precious hours he had lost for want of books and teachers. The tone of his correspondence, however, is never desponding, but always cheerful. The following extract from a letter to his father, written in November, 1815,—certainly not a season of exhilarating influences in Northern Germany,—is but a fair specimen of the spirit which animates all his communications. The shortest days are soon coming, and I am glad of it. . . . . At home I used to delight in the silence and darkness of the morning, and a long, uninterrupted winter's evening had pleasures that were all its own; but here, where the sun hardly rises above the damp and sickly mists of the horizon through the whole day, where candles must be burnt till nine in the morning and lighted again at three,— here the<
Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
Schultze, Michaelis, Kastner. Wolf. excursion to Hanover. On arriving at Gottingen, which was to be Mr. Titself, as you know, is now within the dominions of Hanover, and was formerly just comprehended within that of the especial patronage of the British throne, until Hanover was seized by the French. Ever since then it has singen as an establishment which belonged neither to Hanover nor to Germany, but to Europe and the world; and heutions proceeded to open insult, and the Regency at Hanover interfered and ordered him to beg Michaelis's pardoicknor and Mr. Everett made a visit of five days to Hanover, leaving Gottingen September 19th, and returning thte. The following are passages from his journal in Hanover:— Hanover, September 20, 1815.—This morning I Hanover, September 20, 1815.—This morning I called on Count Munster, Minister of State for Hanover. I found him a man of about forty-five, well-built, talHanover. I found him a man of about forty-five, well-built, tall, and genteel. He speaks English like a native, and though his conversation was not very acute, it was discur<
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 4
s for Germany, and Mrs. Starke's for Italy,—which were the best to be had,—I found them of little value. . . . . I read what I could best find upon Italy, and took private lectures on the Modern Fine Arts, delivered in Italian by Professor Fiorello, author of the History of Painting; on the Ancient Fine Arts, by Professor Welcker, in German, afterwards the first archaeologist of his time; on Statistics, in French, by Professor Saalfeld, and in German, on the Spirit of the Times; of all of which I still have at least six volumes of notes, besides two miscellaneous volumes on Rome, and other separate cities and towns of Italy. . . . . But in Spain and Portugal I was reduced very low, travelling much on horseback, though with a postilion, who took a good deal of luggage; but I like to remember that even in those countries I carried a few books, and that I never separated myself from Shakespeare, Milton, Dante, and the Greek Testament, which I have still in the same copies I then us
France (France) (search for this): chapter 4
s profitably, and then I shall probably resort to those of Eichhorn on literary history, and to those of some other professors on Greek, Roman, and German literatures. If I find this mode of instruction profitable, and nothing calls me sooner to France, I shall remain here until next April. You now know, my dear father, all that I know myself about Gottingen and my prospect in it. . . . . There is no such thing as a royal road to learning; but in the means, opportunities, and excitements off himself by it. Do not think, said he, that I am ignorant of the disaffection in Gottingen, or that it will escape unpunished. You flatter yourselves that I shall lose my throne, but you are mistaken. As long as my brother sits on the throne of France, so long I shall be your king, and I will use my power to punish your ingratitude. The University shall be remodelled,—it shall be a French University. I will have French professors,—men of virtue and patriotism, etc., etc. After a considera
Leipzig (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
rte, indeed, once sent Denon, the Egyptian traveller, and another savant, to look among the treasures of its Library, but they carried nothing away. While Halle, Leipsic, and Jena were suffering under his brutal depredations on their funds and among their books, he declared that he considered Gottingen as an establishment which beroportion of the young men of the country are in the ranks of the army, from choice or compulsion, and all the other literary establishments, even those at Halle, Leipsic, and Berlin, are languishing for want of pupils—reckons on its books above eight hundred and forty regular pupils. The number of professors is proportionally gr. He died in 1817. After his death, his works were collected and published by his friend Bouterweck, with a short sketch of his life. A new edition appeared in Leipsic in 1855, in four volumes, with a more full biography. An account of his life and works may be found in the third volume of Taylor's Historic Survey of German Poe
new Marius, rushing from the marshes of Minturnae, had attained his former power, yet I think, unless the students had been as patriotic as they were at Jena, everything would have continued to go on in its accustomed order. They did, indeed, discover a strong and honorable and even imprudent feeling, on Bonaparte's retreat from Moscow, and Jerome was for the moment very angry; but I think he would soon have forgotten his vengeance. Even before the spirit had begun to awake in Poland and Prussia, the young men here felt its deep and dangerous workings. Secret clubs, which even the vigilance of the police could not discover, though it suspected them, were cautiously but resolutely formed, and the whole cemented into a body by an institution which they called the League of Patriotism. Bonaparte's routed army crossed the Beresina, and the Prussians (students) disappeared; it entered the borders of Germany, and the Mecklenburgers were gone; and in this way, as he advanced towards a
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