hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 161 total hits in 63 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
an anything I have met in Europe. There is more national character here, more originality and poetry in the popular manners and feelings, more force without barbarism, and civilization without corruption, than I have found anywhere else. Would you believe it?—I speak not at all of the highest class,—what seems mere fiction and romance in other countries is matter of observation here, and, in all that relates to manners, Cervantes and Le Sage are historians. For, when you have crossed the Pyrenees, you have not only passed from one country and climate to another, but you have gone back a couple of centuries in your chronology, and find the people still in that kind of poetical existence which we have not only long since lost, but which we have long since ceased to credit on the reports of our ancestors. The pastoral life—I will not say such as it is in Theocritus and Virgil, and still less such as it is in Gesner or Galatea, but a pastoral life which certainly has its poetical sid<
Seville (Spain) (search for this): chapter 9
posted up, condemning anew the heresy of Martin Luther, and, as it was then imagined to be making some progress there, calling on servants to denounce their masters, children their parents, wives their husbands, etc., in so many words. I could not get a copy of it by ordinary means, and did not like to use any others, on account of the archbishop. Just before I was at Cadiz, the Inquisition entered the apartments of a young German and took away his private books, deemed dangerous; and at Seville some of my ecclesiastical friends cautioned me about my conversation in general society, on account of the power and vigilance of the holy office there; though certainly nobody was ever less obnoxious from heresy in Spain than I was, for my best friends were always of the Church. The Nuncio and a shrewd little secretary he had even thought to convert me by putting good books into my hands, though I should never have suspected it if the Prince de Laval had not let me into the secret. Two
Salmantica (Spain) (search for this): chapter 9
f schools are so suecessful that it is extremely rare to find a person who cannot read and write, and who has not pretty good, shrewd general ideas; but here comes a great hiatus in the means of education; for while the Universities of Alcala, Salamanca, etc., are so fallen that nobody pretends to go to them but as a matter of form, to have permission to be an advocate or a physician, or some other privileges that were anciently attached to their degrees, the capital has not only done nothing botany at the Botanic Garden, lectures on physics at the Gabinete, and similar disjointed instructions, that make up no system, and lead to no distinct end. . . . . The law is not taught at all, being left entirely to the monks of Alcala and Salamanca, and the kind decree of Mr. Garay, who permits every man to become a lawyer that will pay a certain inconsiderable sum to the Treasury. The healing art is very ill taught at their dirty hospital by five professors, for medicine, surgery, anato
Granada (Spain) (search for this): chapter 9
instruction and the freedom of the press. As a part of the civil government it is hardly felt in individual instances, though still it is not to be denied that persons have sometimes disappeared and never been heard of afterwards; as one since I have been here, who is believed by everybody to be in the Inquisition, and another, who certainly was there before, and escaped to England about the time of my arrival. The Inquisition, however, I have since found more powerful in the South. At Granada I saw a printed decree posted up, condemning anew the heresy of Martin Luther, and, as it was then imagined to be making some progress there, calling on servants to denounce their masters, children their parents, wives their husbands, etc., in so many words. I could not get a copy of it by ordinary means, and did not like to use any others, on account of the archbishop. Just before I was at Cadiz, the Inquisition entered the apartments of a young German and took away his private books, de
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 9
emely pure; but the consequence is, that they have only eight or ten members; and yet the five volumes they have published, with their Chronicles, Partidas, Fuero Juzgo, etc., do them infinite credit, and show like the work of a great body of learned men. . . . . Even in the large cities and the capital it is astonishing to see how much they are behindhand,—how rude and imperfect is their house furniture, and how much is absolutely wanting. A great deal of the better sort is brought from Paris and London; and when an ambassador has kept a carriage two or three years, until it has become soiled and worn, he can sell it, as they all do, to some grandee, for more than it cost him. In the country it is, of course, worse. The chief persons in a village — I mean the respectable ecclesiastics and the alcaldes —often have no glass-ware in their houses, no dinner-knives, and little of earthen manufactory, while a metal fork is a matter of curiosity. In agriculture their instruments are <
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: Journey from Barcelona to Madrid. Madrid. Conde. government of Spain. the Ias lived seventeen years, and is now called to Madrid to become Director of the Academy of Arts,—a manger ever was who came in the same way. In Madrid things promise well. I have letters to nearlyw more. . . . . Geo. T. To Elisha Ticknor. Madrid, June 3, 1818. On my arrival here, on the 2er Joseph, and permitted to live unmolested in Madrid, where he is much respected. He is about fiftabroad, it is at four, for that is the hour at Madrid; I prefer the latest possible, because it makel and original. . . . . To Elisha Ticknor. Madrid, August 1, 1818. I am sure you will think oy give little or no disagreeable odor. Still, Madrid is not healthy. . . . . Of the government tat it had been an effort to convert him. In Madrid, Cardinal Giustiniani made Mr. Ticknor acquainulate, so that it is the very dirtiest spot in Madrid and its environs. The proportion of deaths in[7 more...]
Toulouse (France) (search for this): chapter 9
I have nothing to do here but to learn Spanish, I think it best to multiply the means . . . .This, however, is an entirely different man from the other. His name is Joseph Antonio Conde; and among all the men of letters I have met in Spain,—and I believe I have seen the most considerable in my department,—he has the most learning by far, and the most taste and talent. He was formerly librarian to the king; when the French came he fled; but, on assurances of personal safety, returned from Toulouse, where he had taken refuge, and was soon afterwards placed at the head of that department of the Ministry of the Interior which was devoted to public instruction. On the restoration of the Bourbons he was of course displaced; but still his merits and his honesty were so notorious that he was excepted (and I believe alone) from the sweeping prosecution of all who had served under Joseph, and permitted to live unmolested in Madrid, where he is much respected. He is about fifty years old, ex
France (France) (search for this): chapter 9
he antiquity and splendor of his family, one of the first, if not the very first nobleman in Europe, and, from his personal talents and virtues and fidelity, one of the chief supporters of the French throne. Immediately on the return of the king he was appointed ambassador here; not only from the great importance of the post arising from the connection then to be formed anew between the two branches of the restored family, but from the great dignity of the appointment, as the chief embassy France sends, since it is from a Bourbon to a Bourbon, and from the great personal influence he has with the king and court. . . . . I dine with him two or three times every week, and see him more or less every day; for if by accident I do not meet him in the evening, I am sure that in the morning he will look into my quarters, telling me that he came to see whether I was sick; and still oftener he comes and sits with me to read or to talk, for he is the only Frenchman whose literary opinions an
Barcino (Spain) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: Journey from Barcelona to Madrid. Madrid. Conde. government of Spain. the Inquisition. public institutions. education. School for deaf-mutes. bull-fights. To Elisha Ticknor. Madrid, May 23, 1818. My last was from Barcelona, dear father and mother, just fourteen days ago. As you may well suppose, in a country such as this, where all comfortable or decent means of travelling fail, I took the shortest route to reach this place; but, though the distance i opportunity to purchase provisions, you cannot keep so provided that you will not sometimes want a meal. Since I left Barcelona I have not been in a single inn where the lower story was not a stable, and of course the upper one as full of fleas asa certain degree of obedience, and the king decrees it; but the obedience may or may not follow, as in a case I knew at Barcelona, where an oppressed individual demanded simply a hearing of his case. The king ordered it by a formal decree to be had
George W. Erving (search for this): chapter 9
ly every one of the foreign ministers, to the Pope's Nuncio from Consalvi, the Pope's Prime Minister, to the Secretaries of the three Royal Academies, etc.; and Mr. Erving, our Minister, has received me with very remarkable kindness. A week hence you shall know more. . . . . Geo. T. To Elisha Ticknor. Madrid, June 3, 1818. the objects for which I came. But you like to have details, and I like to give them to you. In the first place, I am settled in lodgings procured for me by Mr. Erving, with people he knows to be honest, and whom I find uncommonly neat; which, you will observe, are the two rarest virtues in Spain. In the next place, I rise eay distinct from the diplomatic, and is to be found only in late evening parties, called tertulias, which all the principal people have every night, and to which Mr. Erving can introduce me better than anybody else. . . . . Farewell. Geo. T. To Mrs. Walter Channing. Madrid, July 25, 1818. . . . . Spain and the Spanish peo
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...