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Pillnitz (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
o Mr. Ticknor and his family, in consequence of an introduction from Gerhard. Mr. Forbes was still English Minister to the Saxon Court, and, on his return from an excursion, he resumed his old kind and familiar intimacy with Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor. But, above all, the friendship, which their correspondence had cherished and increased, between the King and Mr. Ticknor, was further strengthened by the warm and simple welcome which King John gave his American friend, desiring him to come to Pillnitz to see him without other form than at a private house, and summoning him repeatedly to dinner, on all which occasions he treated him with affectionate confidence. On the 27th of August Mr. Ticknor took his family for a short visit to Berlin, where they remained together for six days, and where he outstayed his party. Rejoining the ladies in Dresden on the 7th of September, he again left them there on the 14th, and went to Berlin for another week. In Leipzig, where he stopped three time
Keir (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 16
oubles that may wear him out . . . . . Kenyon, too, is very ill with asthma, at the Isle of Wight, where he has taken a beautiful place, and on finding himself a little better asked us to come and see him for as long as we could stay. But it is not possible, or we should certainly go. Colonel Harcourt asked us, also, to the Isle of Wight, and at one moment I thought we might combine the two; but I must not be too late on the Continent, or my plans will be all spoiled. Stirling invites us to Keir, when we come back, and I shall try to go if I can. A dinner at his house in town was as recherche as anything that has happened to me of the sort; and his house, filled with curious books, old silver, and objets d'art, is quite marvellous,—nearly all collected, he says, since you were here. The breakfasts are very formidable. They have become dinners in disguise. . . . . But they are agreeable. Old Lord Lansdowne says he enjoys them more than any other form of society, and I have met h
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
sions, and that, as we are growing stronger and more formidable, it is as well to meet the trial soon, as later. Those in power, however, seem to me to wish to put it off as long as they can. There were complaints about enlistments in the United States during the Crimean War. See ante, p. 295. . . . . To Hon. Edward Everett. Brussels, July 30, 1856. . . . . I began this letter at its date, at Brussels, but I was much crowded with work then, and now I finish it at Bonn. Parts of thdon's. . . . . Just before dinner was announced, Lord Clarendon came up to me and said, with rather a peculiar manner, that attracted my attention at once, Here is a gentleman who wishes to be introduced to you. He has been a good deal in the United States, and knows all about you, but has never seen you; and yet he is a pretty notorious man,—it is Mr. Crampton,—and then he burst into a very hearty laugh, for which he is somewhat famous, and was joined by Sir Charles Wood, and one or two people
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Crimea, where he went through all the battles and sieges in a battalion which brought home less than half its numbers . . . . . Now he has a very agreeable, fine-looking wife, to whom he has been married only a few weeks, the day but one, I believe, after he marched through London in that great show of the reception of the Guards by the Queen, which we were smuggled through the lines to see by Lord and Lady Ellesmere . . . . Then I drove to see Mad. Bunsen, from whom I had a letter at Frankfort, telling me that her husband was in Switzerland. I found her very hearty in her welcome, and her two daughters very nice; all living in a pleasant house just outside of the town . . . . I liked so well that I think I shall go again this evening . . . . Anna has just come down from the castle, and says your mother and H. mean to dine there under the trees. . . . . She, herself, goes to see her old friend Mad. B., and very likely I shall drive there with her and go and see Professor Mohl
ou in ignorance of Count Frederic Thun, the present civil governor of the Lombardo-Venetian kingdom, or of his charming wife, or of the most agreeable dinner we had in his palazzo at Verona. When we left him, he told us he should soon be in Milan on business, and that very likely he should see us again. Last evening he came in at eight o'clock—just like an old friend in Park Street—and sat with us till bedtime. His English is excellent, and he talked with great frankness and power; about European politics generally, the troubles in Germany in 1848-49, and the present state of Italy. I have seldom been more interested . . . . Radetzky, at ninety, is full of fire, rising at four in the morning, and working, with faculties unbroken by age, until evening, when he goes early to bed. This year, for the first time, his physicians told him that he could not any longer mount on horseback. For a moment it distressed him very much, and he wept. Even afterwards it continued to worry him,
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 16
and sieges in a battalion which brought home less than half its numbers . . . . . Now he has a very agreeable, fine-looking wife, to whom he has been married only a few weeks, the day but one, I believe, after he marched through London in that great show of the reception of the Guards by the Queen, which we were smuggled through the lines to see by Lord and Lady Ellesmere . . . . Then I drove to see Mad. Bunsen, from whom I had a letter at Frankfort, telling me that her husband was in Switzerland. I found her very hearty in her welcome, and her two daughters very nice; all living in a pleasant house just outside of the town . . . . I liked so well that I think I shall go again this evening . . . . Anna has just come down from the castle, and says your mother and H. mean to dine there under the trees. . . . . She, herself, goes to see her old friend Mad. B., and very likely I shall drive there with her and go and see Professor Mohl, brother of the one in Paris, and perhaps — if
Heidelberg (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
look so much alike that we call them the twins. . . . . The Ministry were, no doubt, partly responsible for the mistakes about the enlistment last summer,—more, perhaps, than they can well admit. They were too much engrossed by the Russian war, and the worrying arrangements for the peace before the negotiations began, to be able to give the American difficulty the degree of attention it needed. So I think Crampton will get a place and be contented with it. To Mrs. William S. Dexter. Heidelberg, August 8, 1856. Dearest Lizzie,—I hardly know what I can write to you, your mother and Anna have written so much, except to renew to you expressions of my affection, which you feel as sure of without their repetition as with it. But I must write something; it is a want I feel to have intercourse with you. Only last night I looked over to the other side of the table, thinking to see you there; so entirely have you kept your place in my thoughts. And thus I miss you constantly. Give my
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 16
y, gave me the account of his mode of life for the last three years, including the war with Russia and the Conferences at Paris . . . . But, I said, do you never give yourself a holiday? Yes, he replied, I gave myself one holiday at Paris, and wentParis, and went to a great discussion and showy occasion at the Institute, but the next time I do it I will take chloroform. . . . . He has great spirits, and laughed and frolicked in the gayest manner, but looks much worn and very thin. On my telling him that I nd him a very efficient person. Things go on equally well here. Many books, as you are aware, have been despatched from Paris, and a considerable number will be sent by the steamer that takes this. Others will follow . . . . Thus far my time hher old friend Mad. B., and very likely I shall drive there with her and go and see Professor Mohl, brother of the one in Paris, and perhaps — if I am not too tired—call on Professor Mittermaier, the jurist. But I become easily fatigued. I did too
Tetschen (Czech Republic) (search for this): chapter 16
y for conversation with the then reigning sovereign, Frederic William IV., whose varied accomplishments and versatile talent made a strong impression on him. Von Raumer and Count Raczynski, among old acquaintances, and the younger Schadow, among new ones, added to the pleasures of Berlin. On finally leaving Dresden, September 25, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor had further proof of the constancy of those who had formerly been kind to them, in the warm and earnest welcome given to the whole party at Tetschen, where they stopped a few hours to see Count Thun and his daughters. See Vol. I. p. 505 et seq. Old memories were recalled,—some sadly and tenderly, for the Countess had died,—and their kindness was, if possible, greater than ever. Additional instances of it occurred in Vienna, where Count Thun followed them, and where his sons, Count Franz and Count Leo,—the latter then a Cabinet Minister,—renewed all their former faithful and attractive courtesy; and in Italy, where Count Frederic,
Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
somewhat famous, and was joined by Sir Charles Wood, and one or two people near us, who enjoyed the joke to the full. Mr. Crampton had been recently recalled from Washington, where he was British Minister, on complaints of our government. Mr. Ticknor says elsewhere: Thackeray, who has a strong personal regard for him, was outrageous on the matter, and cursed the Ministry by all his gods for making him, as he said, their scape-goat. As Mr. Ticknor expected, he was soon sent Minister to Hanover, and afterwards to St. Petersburg and Madrid. I found Mr. Crampton very agreeable, and immediately noticed his great resemblance to his father, as I knew Sir Philip in 1835. Yes, said a person to whom I mentioned it, they still look so much alike that we call them the twins. . . . . The Ministry were, no doubt, partly responsible for the mistakes about the enlistment last summer,—more, perhaps, than they can well admit. They were too much engrossed by the Russian war, and the worrying arra
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