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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s daughters, and a few of his friends, the Casatis, Baron Trechi, and some others. Among them was one of Confalonieri's brothers, whom I met at Prince Metternich's last summer. Both evenings were very agreeable, for it was impossible not to feel that the people were kind and good. Manzoni talked well, and upon subjects where he might have been excused from talking at all, because it would have been no discredit to him to have been ignorant; such as the commercial difficulties in the United States, which he regarded in their most important point of view, their moral effect on the people; the slave question, on which he is a thorough abolitionist, so far as to hold that it is our duty at once to do something which shall insure emancipation at some future time, however remote, so that the principle should be now acknowledged. Of his timid sensitiveness I have heard many more striking facts: such as, that he does not like to be in any sort of solitude, not even to go alone to say
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
We dined with them twice, and were much with them besides, and count upon the pleasure of meeting them again in Paris. At their house we met Quinet, who, I hear,—for the first time,—is to be numbered among the living French poets of some note; a man about five-and-thirty, with a good deal of self-sufficiency; au reste, with something epigrammatic and smart in his conversation. . . . . On the way to Paris in the autumn,—having left Heidelberg on the 24th of August,—the party stopped at Frankfort and Wiesbaden. At Bonn,— I had an agreeable meeting with my old friend Welcker, kind and learned as ever, liberal in his politics, so as to be obnoxious to the Prussian government, but so true and honest in his character that no government ought to fear or dislike him. A part of the evening I spent with August von Schlegel, where I met Tourgueneff, a learned Russian, Secretary of the St. Petersburg Academy, and a great admirer of Dr. Channing. It was very agreeable, but Schlegel i
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 5
asses of the North of Italy, the Tyrol, and the portions of Switzerland we did not visit last year . . . . I feel, indeed, now as if I were well enough acquainted with the mountain-country between Vienna and Marseilles; for with our visits to Upper Austria and Switzerland last summer, added to my former passages of the St. Bernard and the Maritime Alps on horseback, I have made seven passages of the Alps,—namely, part of the Brenner, the whole of the Stelvio, the Splu:;gen, the Arlberg, the Simplon, the St. Bernard, and the Corniche,—and seen all the principal lakes, mountains, and valleys on each side of them. Of all this, the lakes of Upper Austria are the most winning and satisfying as lakes, except the Lake of Como, which is of the same sort; the Tyrol is the most picturesque country, and its people, their costumes and houses, the most curious and striking; the Ortler Spitz, the Jungfrau, and the Mont Blanc are the grandest of the mountains; the Valtelline and the valley of the
Certaldo (Italy) (search for this): chapter 5
ldt in a very amusing manner. On first leaving Florence for the North, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor made a visit of one night to the Marchea Lenzoni, at her villa at Certaldo. Just before entering the last [the modern village of Certaldo], the Medici arms, over rather an imposing gateway, informed us that we had reached the villa oCertaldo], the Medici arms, over rather an imposing gateway, informed us that we had reached the villa of the Marchioness Lenzoni, who had invited us to come and pass a day with her, and see whatever remained of Boccaccio's time, all of it being on her estates. She received us very kindly, and settled us at once in excellent and comfortable rooms. She then sent for her fattore,—or man of business,—for the priest of the place, and for a Florence lawyer, and put us into their hands to show us what we wanted to see in Certaldo, being herself a little indisposed. We passed through the lower village, . . . . and then, climbing a precipitous hill, entered the little nest of stone houses where Boccaccio's fathers lived, and where he himself died and was buried
Munich (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
ake of Como, which is of the same sort; the Tyrol is the most picturesque country, and its people, their costumes and houses, the most curious and striking; the Ortler Spitz, the Jungfrau, and the Mont Blanc are the grandest of the mountains; the Valtelline and the valley of the Inn the loveliest of valleys and at the same time the grandest; the Mandatsch Glacier the most solemn of the glaciers, and next after this, the Glacier of Grindelwald and the Mer de Glace. . . . . After a week at Munich—where they again met Mr. Wordsworth and Mr. Robinson–they parted not only from these English friends, but from their Boston fellow-travellers, Gray, Cogswell, and Ward, and went on to Heidelberg, where they remained nearly four weeks, as a pause and rest after just three months of uninterrupted travelling and sight-seeing. Of his acquaintance and interests there, Mr. Ticknor writes thus:— Creuzer, the classical scholar, whom I knew here twenty years ago, seemed to me little changed. S<
San Miniato (Italy) (search for this): chapter 5
topped an instant, and pointed out to us a little villa near, where Varchi lived, and wrote his Istorie Fiorentine; and then, as the Grand Duchess came by, he got into the carriage with her and drove off. May 18.—We went to the gallery this morning, and after going for a short time through its principal rooms, . . . . we sat ourselves down to the collection of original drawings by Perugino, Raffaelle, etc., and had a luxurious hour over them . . . . . Afterwards we drove and climbed to San Miniato in Monte, a grand old church long since deserted, where we found old pictures and frescos in abundance, . . . . and a magnificent view of the ever-beautiful valley of the Arno, and the ever-picturesque Florence . . . . . When shall I see the like again? We dined in the evening at the French Minister's, where everything was as tasteful and as comfortable as possible, and where we met the Belgian Minister, Count Vilain Quatorze, and his wife; the Sardinian, Count Broglia di Monbello; Mr
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
d read, however, gave me the impression that Mazzei was a mere adventurer. Mr. G. T. Curtis, in recalling facts about his uncle, illustrating the retentiveness of his memory, says, I was sitting with Mr. Ticknor one day in his library, about a year before his death, when he was rather feeble in health. That eminent lawyer, Mr. Sidney Bartlett, came in, and happened to mention that he had just had occasion to give a professional opinion on the title to the estate of Monticello, formerly Jefferson's, and he repeated the names of some of the places in the neighborhood. Mr. Ticknor remarked that Philip Mazzei named those places. Mr. Bartlett asked, Who was Philip Mazzei? Mr. Ticknor, with great animation, exclaimed, Don't know who Philip Mazzei was? He then for the space of ten or fifteen minutes made a rapid sketch of Mazzei's history, tracing him into the society of Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Madison, in Virginia. The whole was told with great spirit and vivacity. Carmignani talked
Tyrol (Tyrol, Austria) (search for this): chapter 5
e lovely Valtelline to the Lake of Como; out once more by the Spluegen; through the Via Mala and over the Arlberg to Innsbruck,—a course suggested by Mr. Wordsworth as the best way of seeing and enjoying the Alps. Mr. Ticknor reviews the experiences of these three weeks as follows:— Innsbruck, July 16.—. . . . I do not know that we could have done more in the same time to see what is grand and solemn, or graceful and gentle, in the valleys and mountain-passes of the North of Italy, the Tyrol, and the portions of Switzerland we did not visit last year . . . . I feel, indeed, now as if I were well enough acquainted with the mountain-country between Vienna and Marseilles; for with our visits to Upper Austria and Switzerland last summer, added to my former passages of the St. Bernard and the Maritime Alps on horseback, I have made seven passages of the Alps,—namely, part of the Brenner, the whole of the Stelvio, the Splu:;gen, the Arlberg, the Simplon, the St. Bernard, and the Corn
Heidelberg (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
pter 5: Florence. Pisa. Lucca. Milan. Venice. passes of the Alps. Wordsworth. Heidelberg. A slow and lingering journey from Rome to Florence, by the Perugia route, in exquisite sprish friends, but from their Boston fellow-travellers, Gray, Cogswell, and Ward, and went on to Heidelberg, where they remained nearly four weeks, as a pause and rest after just three months of uninterion throughout Europe. His house is probably the most agreeable, for personal intercourse, in Heidelberg, since there is a greater variety of persons found there than is found elsewhere. . . . . Ieeable acquaintance, however, was the family of the Marquis Arconati, who has taken a house at Heidelberg for the summer, to be near his only child, who is at the University here. They came to see usatic and smart in his conversation. . . . . On the way to Paris in the autumn,—having left Heidelberg on the 24th of August,—the party stopped at Frankfort and Wiesbaden. At Bonn,— I had an a<
Aach (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
uriously entertained than is common in professors' houses in Germany. But Mittermaier, a man just fifty years old, is more a man of the world, notwithstanding his great learning, than any of them. He is President of the Chamber of Deputies in Baden, and therefore a man of a good deal of political consequence in this part of Germany; and his frank and popular manners form rather a striking contrast to those of his caste generally. Besides this, however, he is a laborious and successful profrather large supper-tables, assisted by a single waiting-girl. We knew, too, the old Baron Malchus and his daughter. The old gentleman was Minister of Finance to Jerome Bonaparte when he was King of Westphalia, and afterwards to the King of Wurtemberg; and he used to make us rather long visits, and talk, much at large, of the days of his power and dignity. I have seldom found a person who had such an immense mass of statistical details in his head, and as he has kept up a good deal of inti
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