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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
airman Selectmen. Princeton. In no case are their habits worse, but in some cases better. William B. Goodnow, Chairman Selectmen. Prescott. It is my opinion that their habits have been better on the whole. W. H. Winter, Chairman Selectmen. Provincetown. No worse, but, upon the whole, we think them better citizens than before. S. S. Gifford, Chairman Selectmen. Quincy. As a body, the returned soldiers of Quincy are better men now than when they entered the United States service. Ebenezer Adams, Chairman Selectmen. Randolph. I fully believe as a general thing that their habits have been improved. J. White Belcher, Chairman Selectmen. Richmond. I have made inquiries from those who do not sympathize with the Republican party; they are free to say that the soldiers have come home improved, without an exception. George cook, Chairman Selectmen. Rockport. The remark is made almost daily in regard to some soldier that there is more m
Rockport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
y, the returned soldiers of Quincy are better men now than when they entered the United States service. Ebenezer Adams, Chairman Selectmen. Randolph. I fully believe as a general thing that their habits have been improved. J. White Belcher, Chairman Selectmen. Richmond. I have made inquiries from those who do not sympathize with the Republican party; they are free to say that the soldiers have come home improved, without an exception. George cook, Chairman Selectmen. Rockport. The remark is made almost daily in regard to some soldier that there is more manliness and dignity of character about him since he went to war. Henry DENN1S, Jr., Chairman Selectmen. Rowley. As a body their habits are no worse than when they left; some of them have greatly improved in that respect. One man, who was a pest in society, came home at the end of three years a reformed man, with about six hundred dollars saved from his wages and bounty, and has been sober and indust
Groveland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
tmen that there has been a decided improvement in the manners and morals of many of the men who enlisted from this town; and that the contrary of this cannot be said of any of our returned soldiers. A. White, Chairman Selectmen. Greenfield. Most of the foreigners return improved, and have more ambition and self-respect, and, upon the whole, both natives and foreigners have returned improved, and with higher and better views of life and duty. H. Stevens, Chairman Selectmen. Groveland. In regard to their habits, we are of the opinion that twenty of them have improved; that they are men of more character; about seventy of them are about the same as when they entered the service; and about ten of them are worse. N. Ladd, Chairman Selectmen. Hadley. So far as I know, they are better men than before they enlisted. E. Edson, Chairman Selectmen. Hancock. We think their habits are better, if anything, than they were before they entered the service. H. H
Sudbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
electmen. Stoneham. We have made a thorough investigation, and find that, as a whole, they are better members of society. John Hill, Chairman Selectmen. Stockbridge. Take the soldiers that we sent to the war, as a body, they are not only as good men now as they were when they enlisted, but even better. M. Warner, Chairman Selectmen. Stoughton. We think none of them are any worse, and many of them are better than when they enlisted. J. Adams, Chairman Selectmen. Sudbury. I think there has been an improvement in those who were somewhat irregular in their habits. T. P. Hurlburt, Chairman Selectmen. Taunton. They are not any worse citizens than before they became soldiers, but many of them are more orderly and better behaved men than before their enlistment. Robert Crossman, 2d, City Marshal. Templeton. I was one of the class of men who, at the breaking out of the Rebellion, thought that most of the soldiers who returned from the war wo
Lunenburg, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
, have returned better men and citizens than they were before they went. Hammond Reed, Chairman Selectmen. Lincoln. So far as my observation extends, they have returned home vastly improved in personal appearance and gentlemanly manners and bearing, and thus better fitted for the duties of citizens. William Wheeler, Chairman Selectmen. Ludlow. It is my opinion that our returned soldiers are better men than when they entered the army. J. S. Eaton, Chairman Selectmen. Lunenburg. Those who returned are better men than before the war. F. M. Marston, H. B. Heyward, Selectmen. Manchester. On the whole, we can say that our soldiers are morally as good as before, while intellectually and bodily there is a decided improvement. George F. Allen, Chairman Selectmen. Marshfield. Their habits are not worse; I am more than half inclined to think they have improved. Luther Hatch, G. M. Baker, Selectmen. Medford. Their habits are full as good, and
North Reading (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
, Jr., Chairman Selectmen. Needham. My opinion is that they are better men than they were before they entered the service. Galen Orr, Chairman Selectmen. New Salem. The habits and morals of the returned soldiers are as good, and on the whole better, than when they went to the war. Elijah F. Porter, Chairman Selectmen. New Marlborough. Upon the whole, their habits have been better than they were before they entered the army. Warren Walker, Chairman Selectmen. North Reading. According to my knowledge and belief, their habits are better. Daniel G. Abbott, Chairman Selectmen. Paxton. We are of the opinion that, generally, there has been an improvement for the better; none worse. Silas D. Harrington, Chairman Selectmen. Peru. The remark is often made, and the conviction is general, that the men have returned with better habits than when they went. E. Warren Pierce, Chairman Selectmen. Princeton. In no case are their habits worse,
Bridgewater (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
table citizen before he enlisted, when he returned he was a far better one. Third, those who were trained to evil deeds before their service have returned quite fixed in their evil habits, not improved for the better in any degree. P. Ball, Mayor. Yarmouth. I am of the opinion that their habits are better. They seem to be more industrious, persevering and anxious to obtain something more than their daily wants. Samuel Matthews, Chairman Selectmen. Unfavorable testimony. Bridgewater. That portion of the returned soldiers who at the time of their enlistment were of age to have acquired habits and characters for themselves, apparently returned as moral, upright men as when they entered the service. A portion of them who entered the army young, from sixteen to twenty years of age, have apparently returned more addicted to the use of strong drink and profane language than when they entered the service. Van R. Swift, Chairman Selectmen. Hamilton. None of the
Provincetown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
t for the better; none worse. Silas D. Harrington, Chairman Selectmen. Peru. The remark is often made, and the conviction is general, that the men have returned with better habits than when they went. E. Warren Pierce, Chairman Selectmen. Princeton. In no case are their habits worse, but in some cases better. William B. Goodnow, Chairman Selectmen. Prescott. It is my opinion that their habits have been better on the whole. W. H. Winter, Chairman Selectmen. Provincetown. No worse, but, upon the whole, we think them better citizens than before. S. S. Gifford, Chairman Selectmen. Quincy. As a body, the returned soldiers of Quincy are better men now than when they entered the United States service. Ebenezer Adams, Chairman Selectmen. Randolph. I fully believe as a general thing that their habits have been improved. J. White Belcher, Chairman Selectmen. Richmond. I have made inquiries from those who do not sympathize with the Re
Sandwich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Rowley. As a body their habits are no worse than when they left; some of them have greatly improved in that respect. One man, who was a pest in society, came home at the end of three years a reformed man, with about six hundred dollars saved from his wages and bounty, and has been sober and industrious ever since. E. H. Potter, Chairman Selectmen. Royalston. As good citizens as before they went, and in some cases I think better. William W. Clement, Chairman Selectmen. Sandwich. On the whole, they are better citizens than before their enlistment. H. G. O. Ellis, Chairman Selectmen. Salem. My short experience in the army led me to expect that the discipline which was necessarily enforced there would have a beneficial effect on the men composing the army, and my experience the past year, as marshal, has given me no reason to change my mind. R. Skinner, Jr., City Marshal. Saugus. Their conduct has been as good, if not better, than before they ent
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
when they left for the war, and in some cases better. Charles W. Knox, George S. Williams, B. B. Eastman, Selectmen. Chesterfield. They are as good men, and in some cases better. P. Bryant, Chairman Selectmen. Chicopee. The habits of our returned soldiers are better than before they entered the service. G. H. Knapp, Chairman Selectmen. Cohasset. None are worse, but a large portion are of much better habits. J. Q. A. Lothrop, S. J. Beal, Z. Rich, Selectmen. Dalton. My opinion is that their character and habits stand better in our town than when they enlisted. D. C. Smith, Chairman Selectmen. Dennis. Taken as a whole, they are certainly no worse citizens; we think they are better. J. C. Howes, Chairman Selectmen. Dover. As a general thing their having been in the army has been a benefit to them rather than the reverse. A. L. Smith, Chairman Selectmen. Dracut. I know of several cases where they are much more orderly and tem
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