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York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ther regiments were brought forward, and formed on us at last. Forward march, and on the line of battle moved until with a yell, we charged, and took the field, sleeping on it. Our regiment has reason to be proud of its action and of its colonel. The next morning Ewell moved rapidly to Dispatch Station on the York River railroad in McClellan's rear, the First Maryland on the right. It was sent forward to drive off the picket at the Station, and McClellan was cut off from his base on York river at West Point. For a day or two Ewell's division remained at Dispatch Station until on McClellan's retiring toward James river it rejoined the army and pressed on in pursuit. It was not engaged until Malvern Hill, where the First Maryland lay all the afternoon under the fire of McClellan's seventy guns on his right and his gun boats on his left. After dark, the Maryland regiment joined General Winder, who had the fragment of the Stonewall brigade, which had been badly cut up. Winder ord
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
orted him. This was done satisfactorily, and the next morning Lee followed McClellan to Westover, where he left him, satisfied that any forward movement by the beaten Federal commander was improbable. After Westover the Marylanders were sent to Charlottesville to recruit, where they remained a month, and were then ordered to Gordonsville to guard the depot of supplies and the railroad junction there. They were in camp while Jackson moved swiftly by and on August 9th sprang on Pope at Cedar Mountain in Culpeper. On August 16th a special order from the adjutantgen-eral of the Confederate States to the colonel of the First Maryland was received by him, ordering him to muster the regiment out of service without delay. The regiment could not parade more than two hundred and fifty rifles for duty, but its officers were as efficient, gallant, well-instructed a set of young soldiers as were in either arms. They were in this summary manner dismissed from the service, without charges,
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
emy's pickets at Pole Green church in Hanover county, and the First Maryland was ordered forward (they held the right of Jackson's column) to drive them in. This was done, and they forced them back to Beaver Dam creek, on the farther side of which t, or become an applicant for a place he had won by hard service, and Jackson assigned him to command the Second brigade, Jackson's division, Second corps—Jackson's own. A new regiment was soon brought together, of which James R. Herbert became lie for their liberties and homes! Let each man provide himself with a stout pair of shoes, a good blanket and a tin cup. Jackson's men have no baggage. Officers are in Frederick to receive recruits, and all companies formed will be armed as soon and reported for duty and resumed command of the Second brigade, and Johnson had no location in the army. He rode with Jackson's staff, but it was impossible to-care for green volunteers in the rapid evolutions of the army of Northern Virginia fro
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of their colonel. Their captain, Michael Stone Robertson, belonged to an historic family in Charles county and was a descendant of Col. John H. Stone, colonel of the First regiment of the Maryland Line of the Revolution. His words as he fell were, Go on, boys, don't mind me, and he died at his next breath. Lieut. Nicholas Snowden, of Company D, who died at the same time, had been captain of a cavalry company in Prince George's in 1860-61, and had joined Captain Herbert, his cousin, at Harper's Ferry, early in May, 1861. He was as honest, gallant and high-minded a gentleman as ever lived. The blood that Maryland poured out on that evening of June 6th was as precious and as glorious as any she has ever given in all her history, at Long Island, at Monterey, or in the army of Northern Virginia. At Staunton the regiment was reinforced with a new company under Capt. John H. Barry, which was designated Company G. About June 24th Jackson made a sudden disappearance from the front of F
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. After Cross Keys and Port Republic, when Fremont and Shields were sent whirling down the valley, Jackson made a feint of pursuit, and pushed his cavalry some marches after them. He ordered the First Maryland to Staunton to recruit, where, during the next ten days, Company I was mustered out on June 17th, its time having expired. These men .left the regiment with the respect of the whole command and the love of their colonel. Their captain, Michael Stone Robertson, belonged to an historic family in Charles county and was a descendant of Col. John H. Stone, colonel of the First regiment of the Maryland Line of the Revolution. His words as he fell were, Go on, boys, don't mind me, and he died at his next breath. Lieut. Nicholas Snowden, of Company D, who died at the same time, had been captain of a cavalry company in Prince George's in 1860-61, and had joined Captain Herbert, his cousin, at Harper's Ferry, early in May,
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
June 6th was as precious and as glorious as any she has ever given in all her history, at Long Island, at Monterey, or in the army of Northern Virginia. At Staunton the regiment was reinforced with a new company under Capt. John H. Barry, which was designated Company G. About June 24th Jackson made a sudden disappearance from the front of Fremont, and reappeared on Lee's left on the Chickahominy. He picked up the First Maryland at Staunton, and moved by train. On the 25th he reached Ashland on the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac railroad, fifteen miles north of Richmond, and at daylight of the 26th moved east toward Lee's left. By three o'clock he got in touch with the enemy's pickets at Pole Green church in Hanover county, and the First Maryland was ordered forward (they held the right of Jackson's column) to drive them in. This was done, and they forced them back to Beaver Dam creek, on the farther side of which they made a stand, and the Marylanders could not move th
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
th sprang on Pope at Cedar Mountain in Culpeper. On August 16th a special order from the adjutantgen-eral of the Confederate States to the colonel of the First Maryland was received by him, ordering him to muster the regiment out of service withoukson and Ewell sent Colonel Johnson letters of regard and sympathy and also recommendations to the President of the Confederate States, that he be made brigadier-general. Colonel Johnson declined to go to Richmond, or become an applicant for a placeunder my. command within the limits of your State, so far as that purpose concerns yourselves. The people of the Confederate States have long watched with the deepest sympathy the wrongs and outrages that have been inflicted upon the citizens of aworking out their own redemption, for which they have so long waited and suffered and hoped. The government of the Confederate States is pledged by the unanimous vote of its Congress, by the distinct declaration of its President, the soldier and sta
Old Cold Harbor (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
hey forced them back to Beaver Dam creek, on the farther side of which they made a stand, and the Marylanders could not move them. General Jackson, riding up, asked Johnson, Colonel, what have you stopped for? I can't get those fellows there out of the woods! Give them some shell! and the colonel ordered up the Baltimore light artillery, which soon quieted the fire on the other side. It was then dark and the command lay down in line of battle. At daylight they moved forward toward Old Cold Harbor, and by noon were ordered to support artillery. They remained in this position until nearly sundown. The battle had been raging for hours on the right. The roll of musketry surged on like the surf of the ocean—until it breaks and then recedes. The battle on the right made no progress. All the infantry had been sent in until the Maryland regiment was left alone with the batteries. General Jackson, riding by, said, Colonel, take your command in. What shall I do with the batteries
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
nt commands gave no points of rendezvous for raw recruits seeking an association in an army. General Lee and the Confederacy were much disappointed at the failure of Maryland to rise, but this disappointment was without adequate reason. Lee crossed the Potomac on September 5th and the next day, the 6th, camped around Frederick. The population of that section of Maryland was strongly Union, fully one-half of it being adherents of that side. On September 10th Lee moved from Frederick to Hagerstown and the next week was taken up in operations which culminated in the battle of Sharpsburg on September 17th. McClellan moved from Washington on the 6th, his columns covering the whole country between Lee's army and southern Maryland, where the chief strength of the Confederates lay. So Lee was only stationary four days, and at no time was the country open for Confederate sympathizers to join him. He issued this proclamation: Headquarters Army N. Va. Near Fredericktown, September 8
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of its action and of its colonel. The next morning Ewell moved rapidly to Dispatch Station on the York River railroad in McClellan's rear, the First Maryland on the right. It was sent forward to drive off the picket at the Station, and McClellan was cut off from his base on York river at West Point. For a day or two Ewell's division remained at Dispatch Station until on McClellan's retiring toward James river it rejoined the army and pressed on in pursuit. It was not engaged until Malvern Hill, where the First Maryland lay all the afternoon under the fire of McClellan's seventy guns on his right and his gun boats on his left. After dark, the Maryland regiment joined General Winder, who had the fragment of the Stonewall brigade, which had been badly cut up. Winder ordered Colonel Johnson forward to cover and hold as much of the field as possible until daylight while he supported him. This was done satisfactorily, and the next morning Lee followed McClellan to Westover, where he
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