hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Nelly 138 2 Browse Search
W. T. McAllister 64 2 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Grey 51 49 Browse Search
Newnan (Georgia, United States) 45 7 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 40 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Fenner 39 1 Browse Search
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 39 7 Browse Search
Francis Thornton 29 1 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,516 total hits in 382 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
and the enemy within a mile of them, when they destroyed their pieces, swam Duck River, and started after the army. The terrors of the retreat from Tennessee in midwinter, the men shoeless, without blankets, and almost without clothes, need not be recounted here. January 10. The battery reached Columbus, Mississippi. January 31. Ordered to Mobile. Remained there as heavy artillery till 11th of April, when it was evacuated; go up the river to Demopolis; from there to Cuba Station, Meridian, where, on the 10th of May, arms are laid down and the battery with the rest of General Taylor's army. A member of the battery, who was an exceptional soldier, and who still cherishes and venerates everything that reminds him of the glorious past, has kindly placed in my hands some letters which I am permitted to copy and here subjoin, feeling sure that they will prove quite as interesting as the numerous documents of the kind published in the lives of those high in authority, although
Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ta, he was shot through the hip, the bullet remaining in the wound, causing intense suffering, until 1870, when it was extracted, and the wound healed for the first time. Notwithstanding this wound, he insisted upon returning to his command, which, in the mean time, had joined Wood's regiment of cavalry. This was in 1865, and so wounded he served three months, surrendering with General Wirt Adams at Gainesville. A short but very glorious record. This young hero is now residing in Shreveport, Louisiana, is a successful physician, and an honored member of the veteran association of that city,—Dr. James A. O'Leary. Of his brothers, the oldest, Ignatius S. O'Leary, served throughout the war, and is now a prominent druggist of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Dr. Richard O'Leary, surgeon P. A. C. S., now practises medicine in Vicksburg. Cornelius O'Leary, badly wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg, lay on the field for hours with the legions of friend and foe alternately charging ov
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
umbia. There was no turnpike, the roads were in awful condition, the horses reduced and broken down, and a continuous rain pouring down. Two of the guns reached Columbia in safety; the other two would have been brought through but for the swelling of a creek by the rain, which it was impossible to cross,—the only guns the battery ever lost. The men remained by them alone till Columbia was evacuated by our forces and the enemy within a mile of them, when they destroyed their pieces, swam Duck River, and started after the army. The terrors of the retreat from Tennessee in midwinter, the men shoeless, without blankets, and almost without clothes, need not be recounted here. January 10. The battery reached Columbus, Mississippi. January 31. Ordered to Mobile. Remained there as heavy artillery till 11th of April, when it was evacuated; go up the river to Demopolis; from there to Cuba Station, Meridian, where, on the 10th of May, arms are laid down and the battery with the rest
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ly complimented in orders for gallantry and efficiency. From this point, in continual conflict with the enemy, the army gradually fell back till it reached Atlanta, around which continuous fighting was kept up, until its evacuation on the 2d of September. 1st September. Battle of Jonesboroa, in which the battery was engaged. This may be considered the end of the Georgia campaign. After brief rest at Lovejoy's Station, the army commenced its long march to Tennessee by Centre, Jacksonville, Gadsden, and Florence. Left Florence November 20; arrived at Columbia, Tennessee, and struck the enemy there November 26. Enemy evacuate on the 28th. November 30. Battle of Franklin. December 2. Reached Nashville. December 6. Fenner's Battery was ordered to join General Forrest's command at Murfreesboroa; participated in the battle of Murfreesboroa on the 8th, and was still with Forrest when the battles of Nashville were fought, on the 15th and 16th, and the great retreat
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
omed as to a home. The Refuge, the residence of John E. Caldwell during the war, was situated in Amherst County, Virginia, about three and a half miles from Lynchburg. The residence was of peculiar build, having more the appearance of the Queen Anne style of architecture than any else, and was probably the only house in that ed situation, it was known far and wide. The estate comprised an area of about eight hundred acres, and was cultivated in wheat, corn, etc. The route to it from Lynchburg lay, for about a mile and a half, along the north side of the James River, from which the road turned at almost right angles toward the north, over an undulatinge warm days of summer. A large orchard of apples, plums, and peaches was immediately in the rear of the residence. Between the farm and the road which led from Lynchburg to Amherst Court-House, a distance of about two miles, was a thick growth of woods, consisting principally of chestnut-trees. The whole face of the country co
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
many of the State hospitals, notably that of Louisiana, than the angelic ministrations of the Siste in any position where I could not nurse any Louisiana soldier friends or others who might desire ome, of Arkansas, who, with Randal Gibson, of Louisiana, Tom Brahan, of Alabama, and my own husband ed in Ringgold was Captain E. John Ellis, of Louisiana. If I am not mistaken, he had been slightlyf it. In fact, New Orleans and the whole State of Louisiana, like every city and State in the South,ed visits from the venerable Dr. Fenner, of Louisiana, and his colleague, Mr. Collins. Each time n and Dalton, later to Macon to look up some Louisiana and Alabama soldiers, and lastly to Atlanta,as Secretary of the Secession Committee when Louisiana seceded, also Secretary of the Legislature. station, Kentucky. From one of the many Louisiana soldiers who received, at the hands of Mrs. l cared for and cherished by the veterans of Louisiana. At the Soldiers' Home she holds the positi[6 more...]
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
efore published, but which is true in every particular. Austin's Battalion of Sharpshooters, composed of two companies, tards the famous battalion: In the Army of Tennessee, Austin's Battalion always occupied the post of honor in the brigae fury upon the advancing enemy. Who is on the front? Austin's Battalion. Then, boys, we can lie down and sleep. Suchthe troops of the Army of Tennessee, to which was attached Austin's Battalion of Sharpshooters. Whose tongue could so graph of the night, when they knew not, until they were assured Austin's Battalion was in the front, if they could snatch a few hours of repose from the toil and danger of battle? Austin's Battalion, famous throughout the armies of the Confederacy for re of a battery, or part thereof, at some time and place. Austin's Battalion had not won that honor when it commenced its d It was published in general orders after the battle that Austin's Sharpshooters captured three times as many prisoners as
Cuba, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Palma, the United States Army, under General Zachary Taylor, lay near the town of Matamoras. Visiting the hospital quarters of a recently-joined volunteer corps from the States, I remarked a bright-eyed youth of some nineteen years, wan with disease, but cheery withal. The interest he inspired led to his removal to army headquarters, where he soon recovered health and became a pet. This was Bob Wheat, son of an Episcopal clergyman, and he had left school to come to the war. He next went to Cuba with Lopez, was wounded and captured, but escaped the garroters to follow General Walker to Nicaragua. Exhausting the capacity of South American patriots to pronounce, he quitted their society in disgust, and joined Garibaldi in Italy, whence his keen scent of combat summoned him home in time to receive a bullet at Manassas. The most complete Dugald Dalgetty possible; he had all the defects of the good qualities of that doughty warrior. Some months after the time of which I am writing,
Genoa Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nd as long as the struggle lasted, but at last to save myself, and join my stores in Macon, Georgia. Remained during the fight, while the city fell, and all my detailed men were captured; rode out of the city by the light of the burning buildings, and my road was lighted for twelve or fifteen miles by the burning city; borrowed horses about twelve at night, caught the last retreating train, put my servants Noel and Sam on it; rode on with my true friend Dr. Yates. Found the servants at Genoa Station, a distance of thirty-five miles, next morning at sunrise, thence to Macon; next night found my wife on the same crowded box-car; left her with Mrs. Yates, Mrs. Calan, and another lady from Columbus. Some of my stores had been sent to Atlanta, and some had been sent to Macon; then the railroad was cut between Macon and Atlanta; I had either to remain at Macon and be captured, or take the only road that was clear to Fort Valley, which I did, leaving my wife and Mrs. Yates at Dr. Green's.
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
-joined volunteer corps from the States, I remarked a bright-eyed youth of some nineteen years, wan with disease, but cheery withal. The interest he inspired led to his removal to army headquarters, where he soon recovered health and became a pet. This was Bob Wheat, son of an Episcopal clergyman, and he had left school to come to the war. He next went to Cuba with Lopez, was wounded and captured, but escaped the garroters to follow General Walker to Nicaragua. Exhausting the capacity of South American patriots to pronounce, he quitted their society in disgust, and joined Garibaldi in Italy, whence his keen scent of combat summoned him home in time to receive a bullet at Manassas. The most complete Dugald Dalgetty possible; he had all the defects of the good qualities of that doughty warrior. Some months after the time of which I am writing, a body of Federal horse was captured in the valley of Virginia. The colonel commanding, who had dismounted in the fray, approached me. A
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...