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Gouverneur K. Warren (search for this): chapter 13
s to have been due to the position occupied by the army with respect to the enemy, which was substantially as follows:—Gen. Warren's Fifth Corps had crossed the river at Jericho Ford, four miles above us, without opposition, and, having advanced somtion of his line that was threatened. When, therefore, Burnside attempted to cross at a point midway between Hancock and Warren, he was repulsed. The situation was now a critical one, for Lee's position was not only invulnerable, but by rapid conce intervals. Heavy firing came up from the left a long distance away. This we now know to have been the attack made upon Warren's corps, near Bethesda Church, by Ewell, who was attempting to turn his left. To relieve this pressure upon Warren, Gen.Warren, Gen. Meade ordered an attack along the whole line. The order was not received in time to be acted upon by all the corps commanders; but Hancock received it, and with commendable and characteristic promptness sent in Barlow's division, which drove the en
David R. Stowell (search for this): chapter 13
re were heavy movements of troops to the right and left, brisk cannonading, and general activity, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranksDavid R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell retu
Charles E. Bruce (search for this): chapter 13
y, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 30. Hosea O. Barnes struck in bowels and killed by sharphooters, Jones' Farm,
clover; lowing herds, and the perfume of blossoms, and the song of summer birds; homesteads of the Virginia planter (everything on a large and generous scale), and great ancestral elms, dating back to the time before our forefathers learned to be Rebels. Coming, as the army so lately did, from where the tread of hostile feet for three years had made the country bare and barren as a threshing-floor, the region through which it now passed seemed a very Araby the Blest. Army of the Potomac. Swinton. The barns and sheds were filled with tobacco in various stages of curing, to which lovers of the weed freely helped themselves. A short halt was made at Guiney's Station; then, pressing on, we arrived at Bowling Green about noon, thirsty and dusty. This is a small settlement, forty-five miles north of Richmond, having in 1860 a white population of 237. There was not an able-bodied white man to be seen, but women, children, and negroes abounded. Some of the women were communicati
Elbridge D. Thresher (search for this): chapter 13
ty, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 30. Hosea O. Barnes struck in bowels and killed by sharphooters, Jones' Farm,
coming back over these roads quicker than you are going now. Are you going On to Richmond? You'll all lay your bones in the ground before you get a sight of it,—were mild specimens of the remarks with which they cheered us on in their most withering manner. But we make brief pause here, and about 4 o'clock reach Milford Station, on the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad. Through this small settlement flows the Mat River, crossed by a bridge which was held by a Rebel force under one Kemper, who happened to be on his way from Richmond to join Lee. Him and his force our cavalry had dislodged by skilful tactics, and had captured sixty-six prisoners before our arrival. Having crossed the bridge and advanced about a mile, line of battle was formed, and the corps bivouacked for the night. Our lot was cast in a luxuriant wheat-field. As the enemy was not far away, Longstreet's corps. a line of earthworks was thrown up for our defence in case of a sudden attack. The next day
quite an extended detour for several reasons: first, that our destination should not be unmasked too soon; second, that the enemy should not assail our flank on the march; and third, because of the nature of the country. Our course finally lay towards the Pamunkey. This river is formed by the confluence of the North and South Anna rivers. Further down, the Pamunkey unites with the Mattapony to form the York River. On the latter is a settlement known as White House. It had been used by McClellan as a base of supplies in the Peninsula Campaign and was selected as our next base of supplies, Port Royal on the Rappahannock, which had been serving that purpose, being now abandoned. We traversed about thirteen miles of country this day, unmolested, bivouacking at night at a place four miles south of Concord Church. Six o'clock of the next morning (Saturday, May 28) saw us again in motion, and an advance of ten miles brought us to the ferry. On May 28, at 7 A. M., the Second Cor
s from its starting point a halt was ordered, and the prospects indicated trouble ahead; which was indeed the case, for the enemy was found strongly posted on the south bank of Tolopotomoy Creek, an affluent of the Pamunkey. It was high noon when an order came sending us to the front; and moving by a road newly cut through the trees, marked by rough guide was place boards directing to the different divisions, we finally emerged in a cornfield on what was known as Jones' Farm. W. Jones.—Michler's Army Map. The rattle of musketry and occasional boom of cannon farther to the right showed that the deadly business had begurn in earnest, and the whizzilng of stray bullets warned us of our nearness to the picket line. A singular incident happened this day on the line of the First Division. This line ran through the yard of the Sheldon House, and behind it were several guns in position exchanging shots with the enemy's batteries. In the house were several ladies who had refused to l
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 13
ed sixty-six prisoners before our arrival. Having crossed the bridge and advanced about a mile, line of battle was formed, and the corps bivouacked for the night. Our lot was cast in a luxuriant wheat-field. As the enemy was not far away, Longstreet's corps. a line of earthworks was thrown up for our defence in case of a sudden attack. The next day (May 22) was the Sabbath, and was spent by us in quiet waiting for the rest of the army to come up within supporting distance; but at 7 o'clcross an open plain to capture a tete-de-pont held by the enemy, and covering the approach to the County Bridge above Chesterfield, a wooden structure spanning the river at this point. This bridge-head was held by a part of McLaw's division of Longstreet's corps, which fled precipitately to join their main body on the other bank, as our line, advancing at a double-quick, began to close around them. But thirty of them were captured in the redan, and the road was thus cleared to the bridge, wit
Henry L. Ewell (search for this): chapter 13
eeted with minies. Tolopotomoy Creek was about midway between us and the enemy. Their main line was not visible directly in our front, being screened by woods; but a little to our right front it came into plain view, at a distance, we now judge, of less than a thousand yards. We spent the afternoon in shelling the enemy's lines at intervals. Heavy firing came up from the left a long distance away. This we now know to have been the attack made upon Warren's corps, near Bethesda Church, by Ewell, who was attempting to turn his left. To relieve this pressure upon Warren, Gen. Meade ordered an attack along the whole line. The order was not received in time to be acted upon by all the corps commanders; but Hancock received it, and with commendable and characteristic promptness sent in Barlow's division, which drove the enemy's skirmishers, captured their rifle-pits, and held then all night in spite of a midnight attempt to retake them. Next day (June 1st) we had little to do but w
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