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. Six o'clock of the next morning (Saturday, May 28) saw us again in motion, and an advance of ten miles brought us to the ferry. On May 28, at 7 A. M., the Second Corps crossed the Pamunkey at Holmes's Ferry, four miles above Hanovertown. Banes: History of the Philadelphia Brigade. This crossing-place I conclude to be the one laid down on the government map as Nelson's Ferry, as there is no other at that distance above Hanovertown. Here we came upon the wagon train of the Sixth One of these entered the breast of an artilleryman belonging to a battery which the brigade was supporting, and the man had scarcely cried out to a comrade I am shot! before the murderous ball exploded in his body producing terrible laceration. Banes: History of the Philadelphia Brigade. This extract is made from the chapter on North Anna, but seemed so similar a case that I thought it of sufficient interest to insert here. During the rest of the day the men lay pretty close, now and
four miles from its starting point a halt was ordered, and the prospects indicated trouble ahead; which was indeed the case, for the enemy was found strongly posted on the south bank of Tolopotomoy Creek, an affluent of the Pamunkey. It was high noon when an order came sending us to the front; and moving by a road newly cut through the trees, marked by rough guide was place boards directing to the different divisions, we finally emerged in a cornfield on what was known as Jones' Farm. W. Jones.—Michler's Army Map. The rattle of musketry and occasional boom of cannon farther to the right showed that the deadly business had begurn in earnest, and the whizzilng of stray bullets warned us of our nearness to the picket line. A singular incident happened this day on the line of the First Division. This line ran through the yard of the Sheldon House, and behind it were several guns in position exchanging shots with the enemy's batteries. In the house were several ladies who had ref
F. C. Barlow (search for this): chapter 13
n in shelling the enemy's lines at intervals. Heavy firing came up from the left a long distance away. This we now know to have been the attack made upon Warren's corps, near Bethesda Church, by Ewell, who was attempting to turn his left. To relieve this pressure upon Warren, Gen. Meade ordered an attack along the whole line. The order was not received in time to be acted upon by all the corps commanders; but Hancock received it, and with commendable and characteristic promptness sent in Barlow's division, which drove the enemy's skirmishers, captured their rifle-pits, and held then all night in spite of a midnight attempt to retake them. Next day (June 1st) we had little to do but watch the picket lines, till noon. The Rebel pickets charged down and drove our men from the pits captured by them the day before. Our line then rallied and pressed them up the hill again, only to give way before a stronger wave of the enemy. It was quite exciting to watch the swaying to and fro of
June 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 11: May 20 to June 1, 1864. By the left flank—fresh fields and Pastures New Bowling Green North Anna Chesterfield bridge and that invincible Rebel Battery by the left flank across the Pamunkey at Tolopotomoy Creek. It had become evident that Lee's position was now so strong, all attempts to force him from it by direct assault would be simple madness. Accordingly a new movement to the left flank was begun, in which the Second Corps, preceded by Torbert's cavalry, led off. The movement began on the evening of May 20, under cover of darkness. The Battery broke park about 12 P. M. and joined Tyler's heavy artillerists. Our march was along the road to Fredericksburg in an easterly direction until we reached Massaponax Church, where a turn was made to the southward. The fact that our course took us easterly made the croakers happy. We are now surely withdrawing, they said, and active campaigning is over for the present; but our sudden and positive change
here all night. Monday morning, May 30, we moved forward about four miles through the woods, advancing in part by means of a road cut by the pioneers. This forward movement was one in which all the corps participated, and was made with a view of developing the Rebel position. Our march was directed from Hawes' Shop, or Store, towards Hanover Court House. Gen. Meade's order of May 29. Hawes' Shop was an important junction of several roads, and was contended for most manfully on the 28th instant by three brigades of Union cavalry, under Sheridan, pitted against that of the enemy commanded by Fitz-Hugh Lee and Wade Hampton, with the result in our favor. The scarred trees and Rebel dead that lay yet unburied along our path attested in some degree the severity of the fighting. The Union loss in this battle was upwards of four hundred men, that of the enemy nearly twice as many. There had been some skirmishing as our column advanced, and about four miles from its starting
of Wednesday and Thursday, the 25th and 26th, here, and in the evening of the latter, at 10 o'clock, recrossed the river, on a pontoon constructed below the bridge, going into camp in breastworks near the captured redan. We were preparing for another move, for Grant, having decided that Lee could not be forced from this position, concluded to flank him again. In this operation, the Second Corps was to cover the rear, and so held position on the north side of the river until morning of the 27th, when it, too, moved off, the Tenth breaking park about 10 o'clock. As we lay here, a random Rebel shell dropped among the thirty-sixth Wisconsin regiment that lay in rear of us, killing one man and wounnding three others. The County Bridge had been imperfectly destroyed under the fire of skirmishers by Birney's Division. Afterwards, some of Gen. Tyler's heavy artillerymen were sent back and completed its destruction before the corps left. Our line of march now took us in a course
ring at something down to the left of us, and it become our duty—a pleasant one—to keep them quiet. Our guns had an enfilading fire upon them. A puff of smoke from them was the signal for four from us, rapidly repeated until the desired end was accomplished. Just before night there were heavy movements of troops to the right and left, brisk cannonading, and general activity, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train<
Chapter 11: May 20 to June 1, 1864. By the left flank—fresh fields and Pastures New Bowling Green North Anna Chesterfield bridge and that invincible Rebel Battery by the left flank across the Pamunkey at Tolopotomoy Creek. It had become evident that Lee's position was now so strong, all attempts to force him from it by direct assault would be simple madness. Accordingly a new movement to the left flank was begun, in which the Second Corps, preceded by Torbert's cavalry, led off. The movement began on the evening of May 20, under cover of darkness. The Battery broke park about 12 P. M. and joined Tyler's heavy artillerists. Our march was along the road to Fredericksburg in an easterly direction until we reached Massaponax Church, where a turn was made to the southward. The fact that our course took us easterly made the croakers happy. We are now surely withdrawing, they said, and active campaigning is over for the present; but our sudden and positive change
who happened to be on his way from Richmond to join Lee. Him and his force our cavalry had dislodged by skilful tactics, and had captured sixty-six prisoners before our arrival. Having crossed the bridge and advanced about a mile, line of battle was formed, and the corps bivouacked for the night. Our lot was cast in a luxuriant wheat-field. As the enemy was not far away, Longstreet's corps. a line of earthworks was thrown up for our defence in case of a sudden attack. The next day (May 22) was the Sabbath, and was spent by us in quiet waiting for the rest of the army to come up within supporting distance; but at 7 o'clock, Monday morning, we renewed our march southward, past Karmel Church, striking the North Anna river just at dusk, at a point where the railroad above mentioned crosses it. Finding several batteries already in park here, we at once concluded that our services were not to be called for immediately, but were soon disarmed of this notion by being ordered up to ta
of smoke from them was the signal for four from us, rapidly repeated until the desired end was accomplished. Just before night there were heavy movements of troops to the right and left, brisk cannonading, and general activity, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout return
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