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years had made the country bare and barren as a threshing-floor, the region through which it now passed seemed a very Araby the Blest. Army of the Potomac. Swinton. The barns and sheds were filled with tobacco in various stages of curing, to which lovers of the weed freely helped themselves. A short halt was made at Guiney's Station; then, pressing on, we arrived at Bowling Green about noon, thirsty and dusty. This is a small settlement, forty-five miles north of Richmond, having in 1860 a white population of 237. There was not an able-bodied white man to be seen, but women, children, and negroes abounded. Some of the women were communicative, yet seemingly so only to give utterance to sentiments of the most intense disloyalty. You'll be coming back over these roads quicker than you are going now. Are you going On to Richmond? You'll all lay your bones in the ground before you get a sight of it,—were mild specimens of the remarks with which they cheered us on in their m
ps, near Bethesda Church, by Ewell, who was attempting to turn his left. To relieve this pressure upon Warren, Gen. Meade ordered an attack along the whole line. The order was not received in time to be acted upon by all the corps commanders; but Hancock received it, and with commendable and characteristic promptness sent in Barlow's division, which drove the enemy's skirmishers, captured their rifle-pits, and held then all night in spite of a midnight attempt to retake them. Next day (June 1st) we had little to do but watch the picket lines, till noon. The Rebel pickets charged down and drove our men from the pits captured by them the day before. Our line then rallied and pressed them up the hill again, only to give way before a stronger wave of the enemy. It was quite exciting to watch the swaying to and fro of the respective lines, and when we were sure which was which, we sent a shell or two along to turn the scale; but no decisive results followed this fighting. It was a
sted in firing at something down to the left of us, and it become our duty—a pleasant one—to keep them quiet. Our guns had an enfilading fire upon them. A puff of smoke from them was the signal for four from us, rapidly repeated until the desired end was accomplished. Just before night there were heavy movements of troops to the right and left, brisk cannonading, and general activity, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caisson<
Under the cover of darkness the left section was brought up and put into position in the clearing at the right of the right section, and during the night Tyler's heavy artillerists threw up a strong line of breastworks, along the crest of which we scattered green brush as a screen from sharpshooters. This done, there remained for us but three or four hours in which to sleep, ere the battle which we expected to usher in the morning should summon us to posts. Soon after 6 o'clock of Tuesday, May 31, we commenced firing and continued it in a desultory manner all the forenoon, and he who was so careless or reckless as to show his head above the works was greeted with minies. Tolopotomoy Creek was about midway between us and the enemy. Their main line was not visible directly in our front, being screened by woods; but a little to our right front it came into plain view, at a distance, we now judge, of less than a thousand yards. We spent the afternoon in shelling the enemy's lines
thworks, and passed the night there. At this time the exact position of Lee's army was not definitely known, and Sunday we advanced our line to the right and front somewhat—again erecting breastworks—and lay there all night. Monday morning, May 30, we moved forward about four miles through the woods, advancing in part by means of a road cut by the pioneers. This forward movement was one in which all the corps participated, and was made with a view of developing the Rebel position. Our ma. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 30. Hosea O. Barnes struck in bowels and killed by sharphooters, Jones' Farm
the pioneers. This forward movement was one in which all the corps participated, and was made with a view of developing the Rebel position. Our march was directed from Hawes' Shop, or Store, towards Hanover Court House. Gen. Meade's order of May 29. Hawes' Shop was an important junction of several roads, and was contended for most manfully on the 28th instant by three brigades of Union cavalry, under Sheridan, pitted against that of the enemy commanded by Fitz-Hugh Lee and Wade Hampton, wit. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 30. Hosea O. Barnes struck in bowels and killed by sharphooters, Jones' Farm, Va
d about thirteen miles of country this day, unmolested, bivouacking at night at a place four miles south of Concord Church. Six o'clock of the next morning (Saturday, May 28) saw us again in motion, and an advance of ten miles brought us to the ferry. On May 28, at 7 A. M., the Second Corps crossed the Pamunkey at Holmes's FMay 28, at 7 A. M., the Second Corps crossed the Pamunkey at Holmes's Ferry, four miles above Hanovertown. Banes: History of the Philadelphia Brigade. This crossing-place I conclude to be the one laid down on the government map as Nelson's Ferry, as there is no other at that distance above Hanovertown. Here we came upon the wagon train of the Sixth Corps, which had just crossed. At 1 o'clocral Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 3
ty, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 30. Hosea O. Barnes struck in bowels and killed by sharphooters, Jones' Farm,
ivity, and after dark orders came for us to limber up and move out as quietly as possible. Morning reports. 1864. May 21. Serg't Townsend, Artif. Stowell, Serg't C. Gould, Farrier Bruce, and 12 men with Caissons and B. W. (Battery Wagon?) in Ammunition Train. May 25. Willard Y. Gross appointed Artificer by General Orders No.— Headquarters 10th Battery vice David R. Stowell reduced to the ranks. William Herring appointed Stable Sergeant vice Asa L. Gowell reduced to the ranks. May 26. Elbridge D. Thresher appointed Farrier vice C. E. Bruce returned to the ranks. Corporal Beck sent to caissons in train. One horse worn out and abandoned. May 27. Jonas W. Strout and John M. Ramsdell missing. One horse abandoned—worn out. May 28. Strout returned for duty. One horse worn out and abandoned. Battery Wagon returned with one sergeant and six men. May 29. John Ramsdell returned. May 30. Hosea O. Barnes struck in bowels and killed by sharphooters, Jones' Farm, V
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