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Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
negroes felt Burkesville Junction—on to Richmond Richmond as we saw it to Fredericksburg and Bailey's Cross roads Washington homeward bound palace cars Boston cool reception Galloupe's Island mustered out at last on to Brookline and Marblehead exit Tenth Massachusetts Battery. By degrees—by very slow degrees, we began to realize the great fact of peace. No more rattling shots of the pickets fell upon the ear; no booming of cannon in the distance; and the discharges of artillery ted by all the local organizations and the school children, after which we were shown to tables, under a mammoth tent, richly freighted with the best of rations. Brookline will always occupy a warm corner in the hearts of the Tenth Battery. Marblehead contributed more than thirty men to the organization, and extended the Company a similar invitation to its hospitalities. The invitation was accepted, and the time set, Tuesday, June 20th. Our reception here was a repetition of the one at Bro
Brookline (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ard bound palace cars Boston cool reception Galloupe's Island mustered out at last on to Brookline and Marblehead exit Tenth Massachusetts Battery. By degrees—by very slow degrees, we begany, which went far to remove the unkind feelings engendered by our cool reception. The town of Brookline, which had contributed nearly a score of men to the Battery, was waiting to give the entire or from that honored town, which escorted us to the Worcester Depot. There we took the cars for Brookline, where we were tendered a grand ovation. The town was ablaze with the national colors. The sich we were shown to tables, under a mammoth tent, richly freighted with the best of rations. Brookline will always occupy a warm corner in the hearts of the Tenth Battery. Marblehead contributedpted, and the time set, Tuesday, June 20th. Our reception here was a repetition of the one at Brookline, evincing throughout in every possible way the most cordial good — will and gratitude to the
New London (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
e were treated to a substantial breakfast. We loitered about until past noon, when, having been shown to a decent passenger train, we entered and were whirled away across the plains of New Jersey. We reached South Amboy about 4 o'clock, and embarked on the steamer Transport for New York, being greeted with many patriotic demonstrations as we skirted the shores of New York Bay. Changing steamers at the latter city, we spent a delightful moonlight night on the Sound, and arrived at New London, Connecticut, early Monday morning. We suffered a long and tedious wait here also, but at last the train moved on. Worcester was reached and passed soon after noon, and the familiar stations along the old Boston and Worcester road brought us to realize more vividly that home itself was not far away, and our spirits rose correspondingly. We answered by a waving of the handkerchief or the cap, the kindly tokens of welcome home extended along the route. One man in his earnestness dropped his jac
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
May 11. One horse died of exhaustion. May 12. One horse died of exhaustion. May 14. One horse died of exhaustion. May 16. Private Waldo Pierce transferred to Invalid Corps. Serg't A. B. Parker and Privates Nesbitt, Gowell, Fales, Putnam, Handlin returned from hospital. Corporal Estee and Privates Wilson and Burroughs went to Alexandria and (got)? our ammunition chests. May 18. One horse died—worn out, May 19. Two spare caissons turned in to the Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C., with all equipments and ordnance belonging to it (them)? Corporal J. D. Billings and Private J. M. Ramsdell reported to quarters. Two horses died of exhaustion. May 20. One horse died of farcy. May 23. Grand Review of the Army of the Potomac. May 26. Private T. W. Strand's horse taken up on Report Book. May 27. One horse died—worn out. May 29. Privates J. P. Brown and T. Elworth returned to duty from the train. May 31. Turned over the Battery to the Ordnance Depar
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
enger train, we entered and were whirled away across the plains of New Jersey. We reached South Amboy about 4 o'clock, and embarked on the steamer Transport for New York, being greeted with many patriotic demonstrations as we skirted the shores of New York Bay. Changing steamers at the latter city, we spent a delightful moonlight night on the Sound, and arrived at New London, Connecticut, early Monday morning. We suffered a long and tedious wait here also, but at last the train moved on. Worcester was reached and passed soon after noon, and the familiar stations along the old Boston and Worcester road brought us to realize more vividly that home itself was not far away, and our spirits rose correspondingly. We answered by a waving of the handkerchief or the cap, the kindly tokens of welcome home extended along the route. One man in his earnestness dropped his jacket from the car-window. Another was wildly swinging both cap and kerchief at what proved to be a scarecrow. At last
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ew days orders were received to turn in the Battery at the Arsenal in Washington, which we did, taking our farewell of the 3-inch Parrotts, to which we had become much attached, and which we should have been only too glad to take along to old Massachusetts with us, had such a plan been practicable. The horses, poor service-worn brutes, were turned in with the rest of the government property, and some one curious in such matters discovered that, out of the one hundred and ten animals brought from Massachusetts in 1862, but a single horse remained. All the rest had fallen by bullet or disease. It also appears from the morning reports that the Battery had used up about 400 horses in all. Henceforward preparations went actively on for departure, and everybody seemed happy. We celebrated the last night in camp by a grand illumination, furnished forth by the residue of candles left in the quartermaster's stores, for which we had no further use, decking each tent with a number. Ord
New Store (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
w our advance was ended, and our footsteps must needs be retraced. Let an extract from Lieut. Col. Hazard's Report tell the story of the next few days in brief: April 9:. . . Batteries halted in the road until 4 P. M., when the announcement was made that the army of Northern Virginia had surrendered. The Batteries then went into camp. April 10th: Command remained in camp all day. April 11th: Batteries moved together, under my command, back on the same road. They advanced to New Store, and camped for the night. April 12th: Command moved at 6 A. M. by a plantation, and from thence by the Plank Road to Farmville. Parked on the hills near Farmville. April 13th: Started at 6 A. M., camped near Rice's Station on the Danville Railroad. April 14th: Started at 6 A. M., and marched to Burkesville. Arrived at 2 P. M. Went into camp. Our loss in horses on this move the Report puts at thirty-four. No other battery used up more than ten. I can assign no reason for t
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
uman affairs; while our boys, who had boarded there awhile, pointed out the windows through which they had looked for weeks with feelings akin to despair. A corps of Union troops lined the streets as we passed, and few citizens were to be seen. The negroes, however, and a few whites, brought out pitchers of water for our comfort. Leaving Richmond, we resumed the journey to Alexandria. Passing almost in sight of some of the bloody fields we had fought over the year before, leaving Bowling Green on our right, where we had hoped to stop and renew our acquaintance with those ladies who had so confidently predicted our discomfiture, we at last reached historic Fredericksburg. It looked seedy and crumbling, and with sufficient cause. Its streets were yet strewn with the shells thrown in 1862. Few signs of life were visible. It seemed, in truth, a deserted village. It was our last stopping-place before reaching Alexandria. Strict orders had been, very properly, issued against
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ew set. These were completed in four days and sent up for the inspection of the paymaster, Friday, June 9th, to be returned Monday morning by him in person; but they were not received until Tuesday night, and then only through a vigorous stirring up of somebody by Capt. Adams. The signatures of the men were added the same night. Early Wednesday morning, June 14th, the paymaster appeared, our accounts with the government were settled, our discharges received, and all obligations to the United States were cancelled. We were citizens once more. And now began those marks of appreciation from friends of the Company, which went far to remove the unkind feelings engendered by our cool reception. The town of Brookline, which had contributed nearly a score of men to the Battery, was waiting to give the entire organization a warm greeting. It had been appointed for Tuesday the 13th, but for obvious reasons was deferred. On arriving at the wharf in Boston we were met by a deputation fr
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ht ride brought us to Philadelphia at 5 o'clock in the morning, before people were generally astir, but the booming of cannon announced our arrival, and we were soon marching on, under convoy, to the same Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon that had used us so generously before, and after purifying by water we were treated to a substantial breakfast. We loitered about until past noon, when, having been shown to a decent passenger train, we entered and were whirled away across the plains of New Jersey. We reached South Amboy about 4 o'clock, and embarked on the steamer Transport for New York, being greeted with many patriotic demonstrations as we skirted the shores of New York Bay. Changing steamers at the latter city, we spent a delightful moonlight night on the Sound, and arrived at New London, Connecticut, early Monday morning. We suffered a long and tedious wait here also, but at last the train moved on. Worcester was reached and passed soon after noon, and the familiar stations a
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