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James Dwight (search for this): chapter 5
Dana. Nov. 16. George M. Dixon was carried to Ebenezer Hospital. Nov. 21. Samuel Abell still remains at Boston, sick. Received from Quartermaster Dana 12 horses. Nov. 23. Alonzo N. Merrill sick in quarters and George K. Putnam finger jammed badly. Nov. 24. George K. Putnam sick in quarters. Nov. 25. George K. Putnam, A. A. Blandin and Franklin Ward sick in quarters. One horse died of * * Nov. 26. George K. Putnam, Charles E. Prince and A. N. Merrill sick. Nov. 27. James Dwight, Charles E. Woodiss, J. L. W. Thayer, S. A. Hanson sick in quarters. George M. Dixon sent to Emory Hospital. Nov. 28. Franklin Ward and George K. Putnam sick in quarters. A. B. Fisher assigned to extra duty since Sept. 9, 1862 (?) by Major Munroe, by request of Captain * * Nov. 29. Prince sick in quarters. Nov. 30. Prince returned to duty. Dec. 1. Sergt. Woodfin sent to Post Hospital. Corp'l Starkweather sick in quarters. J. J. Woodard deserted Nov. 7, 1862. Dec. 2. T
Charles Slack (search for this): chapter 5
addition to the foregoing, three Army Wagons, each drawn by four horses, were supplied to carry the forage, rations and camp equipage. Later in our experience, when horse-flesh became scarcer, each of these was drawn by six mules, and Messrs. Slack, Johnson, and Abbott learned a new tongue, which, although mastered with some difficulty, eventually became, with the aid of a little of the black snake, a powerful agent in toning down or spurring on the recalcitrant mule. An Ambulance, drawn. Corp'l Starkweather returned to duty. Dec. 4. One horse died of inflammation of the bowels. Dec. 6. Ward, Putnam and Woodfin returned to duty. Dec. 7. John W. French, Alvin B. Fisher, Chas. E. Bruce, Alvin Abbott, F. A. Chase and Charles Slack detailed on extra duty as per Special Order No. 17, Headquarters Camp Barry, from Oct. 17, 1862. H. B. Winslow and Franklin Ward sick in quarters. Dec. 8. H. B. Winslow returned to duty. Dec. 10. M. G. Critchett, John Pedrick and R. B.
Alvan B. Fisher (search for this): chapter 5
so had the care of spare horses. Besides the six guns and caissons there were a portable Forge and Battery Wagon, which constituted a part of the regular outfit of the Battery. Each was drawn by six horses. The forge was in charge of a blacksmith called an Artificer, Amasa D. Bacon held this position throughout our term of service. who had one assistant. Their duties Assistant Artificer consisted in doing all the shoeing and any other repairs that came within their province. Alvan B. Fisher The battery wagon was in charge of a mechanic also styled an artificer. It was filled with carpenter's tools and extra equipments of various kinds likely to be needed in the ordinary wear and tear of service. In addition to the foregoing, three Army Wagons, each drawn by four horses, were supplied to carry the forage, rations and camp equipage. Later in our experience, when horse-flesh became scarcer, each of these was drawn by six mules, and Messrs. Slack, Johnson, and Abbott
Tobias Beck (search for this): chapter 5
called from their shape), which accommodated four men each. Having got fairly established in camp, the work of organization, begun in Boxford, was carried on to completion. The non-commissioned officers, already alluded to as appointed at Camp Stanton, have been given in the roster. Six other corporals, called chiefs of caissons, were appointed on our arrival at Camp Barry. They were as follows: Lewis R. Allard, James S. Bailey, Jr., William B. Lemon, William H. Starkweather, Tobias Beck, George A. Pease. The duties of the first sergeant were mainly executive, consisting in taking charge of all general or special roll-calls, in exercising an oversight of stable duties, and in calling for details of men under the direction of the Officer of the Day or Commander of the Battery. The duties of the quartermaster sergeant consisted chiefly in supplying rations for the Company and subsistence for the horses, upon requisitions signed by the commander of the Battery. To eac
William B. Lemon (search for this): chapter 5
ght, having been provided with A tents (so called from their shape), which accommodated four men each. Having got fairly established in camp, the work of organization, begun in Boxford, was carried on to completion. The non-commissioned officers, already alluded to as appointed at Camp Stanton, have been given in the roster. Six other corporals, called chiefs of caissons, were appointed on our arrival at Camp Barry. They were as follows: Lewis R. Allard, James S. Bailey, Jr., William B. Lemon, William H. Starkweather, Tobias Beck, George A. Pease. The duties of the first sergeant were mainly executive, consisting in taking charge of all general or special roll-calls, in exercising an oversight of stable duties, and in calling for details of men under the direction of the Officer of the Day or Commander of the Battery. The duties of the quartermaster sergeant consisted chiefly in supplying rations for the Company and subsistence for the horses, upon requisitions signe
John Pedrick (search for this): chapter 5
Chase and Charles Slack detailed on extra duty as per Special Order No. 17, Headquarters Camp Barry, from Oct. 17, 1862. H. B. Winslow and Franklin Ward sick in quarters. Dec. 8. H. B. Winslow returned to duty. Dec. 10. M. G. Critchett, John Pedrick and R. B. Wendall sick in quarters. Dec. 11. M. G. Critchett returned to duty. Dec. 12. Chas. N. Packard and Joseph Cross sick in quarters. One horse shot, disease glanders, by order of Capt. * * Dec. 13. Chas. N. Packard returned toquarters, stables &c., &c., were fully inspected by Col. Webb. Dec. 14. Chas. E. Bruce relieved from extra duty and pay the 12th and Roswell Bemis takes his place and pay as ambulance driver and extra duty man from Dec. * * Joseph Cross and John Pedrick returned to duty. Dec. 15. R. B. Wendall returned to duty. Dec. 19. Franklin Ward sent to Emory Hospital. R. B. Wendall and George W. Park sick in quarters. Dec. 20. Geo. W. Park returned to duty. One horse died of gravel in foot wh
Asa Smith (search for this): chapter 5
of human life in active service, that very day might be their last on earth. Can it be wondered at, then, that like the Indians, as stated by Story, they should turn and take a last sad look at the roofless houses they were leaving behind? Morning reports. 1862. Oct. 18. Received from Quartermaster Dana, 14 horses, 3 baggage wagons and 1 ambulance—making in all 125 horses. Oct. 19. One horse died from influenza and cold, contracted while being transported. Nov. 4. Senior 2nd Lieut. Asa Smith arrived in camp and reported for duty. Nov. 5. One horse died from cold, &c. Nov. 7. James J. Woodard left camp without leave. Nov. 8. One horse died from inflammation and influenza. Nov. 11. One horse died from stoppage and one horse strayed and never found. Nov. 15. Private Jonathan E. Childs died at Emory Hospital of typhoid fever. Six horses condemned and returned to quartermaster Dana. Nov. 16. George M. Dixon was carried to Ebenezer Hospital. Nov. 21.
Jonathan E. Childs (search for this): chapter 5
Dana, 14 horses, 3 baggage wagons and 1 ambulance—making in all 125 horses. Oct. 19. One horse died from influenza and cold, contracted while being transported. Nov. 4. Senior 2nd Lieut. Asa Smith arrived in camp and reported for duty. Nov. 5. One horse died from cold, &c. Nov. 7. James J. Woodard left camp without leave. Nov. 8. One horse died from inflammation and influenza. Nov. 11. One horse died from stoppage and one horse strayed and never found. Nov. 15. Private Jonathan E. Childs died at Emory Hospital of typhoid fever. Six horses condemned and returned to quartermaster Dana. Nov. 16. George M. Dixon was carried to Ebenezer Hospital. Nov. 21. Samuel Abell still remains at Boston, sick. Received from Quartermaster Dana 12 horses. Nov. 23. Alonzo N. Merrill sick in quarters and George K. Putnam finger jammed badly. Nov. 24. George K. Putnam sick in quarters. Nov. 25. George K. Putnam, A. A. Blandin and Franklin Ward sick in quarters. One ho
ruised and bitten in their quarrels, and evidently pretty well used up. A few (lays of feeding and fresh air, however, brought them back to good condition again. About nightfall we were ordered to our future quarters at Camp Barry, named for Gen. Barry, an artillery officer. Died July 18, 1879. The camp was situated a mile or so from the Capitol at the toll-gate of the Bladensburg pike. The Eleventh Massachusetts Battery, already here, greeted us with a cup of coffee all around, and furnmust be admitted (not, however, as in any way due to the management of the Post Commander) that we became good soldiers here. The frequent and vigorous drills of our efficient Captain made us, on the authority of a no less competent judge than Gen. Barry himself, accomplished as artillerists, and of this education we were reasonably proud. Leaves of absence were frequently granted to go up into the city, and even as far as Alexandria, when approved by Gen. Casey. In the earlier part of ou
Frank A. Chase (search for this): chapter 5
nce sick in quarters. Nov. 30. Prince returned to duty. Dec. 1. Sergt. Woodfin sent to Post Hospital. Corp'l Starkweather sick in quarters. J. J. Woodard deserted Nov. 7, 1862. Dec. 2. Three wagoners, Chas. E. Bruce, Alvin Abbott and F. A. Chase detailed on extra duty. Dec. 3. Corp'l Starkweather returned to duty. Dec. 4. One horse died of inflammation of the bowels. Dec. 6. Ward, Putnam and Woodfin returned to duty. Dec. 7. John W. French, Alvin B. Fisher, Chas. E. Bruce, Alvin Abbott, F. A. Chase and Charles Slack detailed on extra duty as per Special Order No. 17, Headquarters Camp Barry, from Oct. 17, 1862. H. B. Winslow and Franklin Ward sick in quarters. Dec. 8. H. B. Winslow returned to duty. Dec. 10. M. G. Critchett, John Pedrick and R. B. Wendall sick in quarters. Dec. 11. M. G. Critchett returned to duty. Dec. 12. Chas. N. Packard and Joseph Cross sick in quarters. One horse shot, disease glanders, by order of Capt. * * Dec. 13. Chas.
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