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Darnestown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
oats near by, for which certificates of indebtedness were given to the owner, furnished supper for the horses and excellent beds for many of us, while others slept between the folds of the tarpaulins. These latter were large squares of canvas used to cover the guns and caissons. They were frequently employed afterwards for a night's shelter when on the march, as they afforded protection from storms, and could be folded and strapped upon the limbers at short notice. Passing on through Darnestown, Tenallytown, and Rockville, we bivouacked one more night, and the next day, Sunday, Dec. 28, about 11 o'clock A. M., arrived at Poolsville. This was a little settlement, of strong secession proclivities, on the upper Potoillac, near Edwards Ferry, interesting as the scene of frequent guerrilla raids. In the most recent of these Maj. White and a party of his followers, who belonged in this neighborhood, had surprised and captured a body of fifty or seventy-five Union cavalry one evening
Muddy Branch, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
y thousand men marched up a hill and then marched down again. We returned to camp at noon; but our troubles did not end here. Gen. Lee was now fairly launched on his great invasion of the North, and our isolated position seemed one fraught with much danger. Now and then the sound of distant cannonading told of cavalry contests between opposing armies as both were pressing northward, but we could hear nothing definite about what was actually taking place. Four days after the raid at Muddy Branch, or Seneca, the centre section was summoned from the Ferry. We threw up rifle-pits on Benson's Hill (our first experience in this kind of engineering, which paled before our later efforts), and kept everything packed ready to move at a moment's notice. Some of us packed up superfluous clothing and conveniences, and expressed them home by way of Adamstown. Night after night the harnesses were placed on the horses, and at 3 o'clock in the morning we were turned out, sleepy and cross, to
Seneca, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
vement was at hand. No papers had come from Washington for some days, and we were left to the mercy of Dame Rumor for all the news we obtained, which was usually scarce worth repeating. At last there came something definite. On the morning of June 11, before sunrise, three or four cavalrymen, hatless, coatless, and covered with dust, came galloping into camp with their horses in a reeking sweat. It seems that a band of Mosby's cavalry surprised their little camp of forty Men—located at Seneca, some six miles down the river—before they were up, killed four, took seventeen prisoners, and fell to plundering the tents. The remainder of the detachment fought desperately a few moments, but being overpowered, took to flight, having killed one and wounded several of their assailants. They belonged to the Sixth Michigan. As soon as the story of the terrified fugitives could be learned, Boot and Saddle was sounded, everything was hastily packed up, and our little force marched breakfa
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
eepy and cross, to hitch them to the pieces in anticipation of an early attack. At daybreak the harnesses were taken off. One night, about one o'clock, an officer rode into camp with the tidings that Rebel pickets were in possession of our rifle-pits. Ah! then and there was hurrying to and fro in the darkness, and silent mustering and mutterings of warriors. All communication with Washington is cut off! was whispered round. We are to fight desperately if attacked, and fall back on Harper's Ferry. A truly agreeable prospect, that historic place being more than thirty miles distant! One section of the Battery was sent out with a reconnoitering party, which returned in a half hour reporting a false alarm. It arose, as we ascertained in the morning, from three or four cavalrymen who had strayed from a detachment of Hooker's army and lain down by the wall to sleep. We treated them to a good breakfast, and from them received our first reliable news of the great invasion. Soon aft
Tennallytown (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
for which certificates of indebtedness were given to the owner, furnished supper for the horses and excellent beds for many of us, while others slept between the folds of the tarpaulins. These latter were large squares of canvas used to cover the guns and caissons. They were frequently employed afterwards for a night's shelter when on the march, as they afforded protection from storms, and could be folded and strapped upon the limbers at short notice. Passing on through Darnestown, Tenallytown, and Rockville, we bivouacked one more night, and the next day, Sunday, Dec. 28, about 11 o'clock A. M., arrived at Poolsville. This was a little settlement, of strong secession proclivities, on the upper Potoillac, near Edwards Ferry, interesting as the scene of frequent guerrilla raids. In the most recent of these Maj. White and a party of his followers, who belonged in this neighborhood, had surprised and captured a body of fifty or seventy-five Union cavalry one evening while they w
Goose Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
traw hat, purchased in the town at the store of Jesse T. Higgins, one of two grocers then located there. During the first week in May the battle of Chancellorsville was fought and lost. Soon afterwards the Rebel movement northward began, and our days of quiet were broken in upon by frequent rumors of a move. The centre section, commanded by Lieut. Asa Smith, was sent to Edwards Ferry the 9th of May, and its guns put in position to command the crossing of the Potomac and the mouth of Goose Creek opposite. It was supported by a squadron of cavalry under command of Capt. Closson. During its stay there Capt. Sleeper concluded to try an experiment, which was, to see how long it would require, should any emergency arise demanding it, to hitch in the rest of the Battery and join this section at the Ferry. The Boot and Saddle call was sounded, the horses taken from the picket, harnessed, hitched in, the cannoneers mounted, and the two sections driven at rapid speed over the more th
Boxford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ace, was the only Union man in the town, more troops were at once sent, and we found already encamped here the Fourteenth New Hampshire and Thirty-ninth Massachusetts regiments, commanded by Colonels Wilson and Davis, respectively. How are you, Boxford? was the greeting from the latter regiment as soon as we were recognized, and it seemed like meeting old friends to fall in with those who had been encamped with us on the soil of Massachusetts. We were now considered to be in the enemy's co apart and weaving among them huge ropes of straw twisted by hand. Thus comfortable quarters were made for the horses. This structure was finished towards the last of January, and occupied the centre of the camp. The tents were arranged as at Boxford, six on either side, removed from the wings of the stable by a street about two rods wide. Within the square stood the harness racks, while in front the Battery was parked. The weather being pleasant for some days after our arrival, our dril
France (France) (search for this): chapter 6
his sword, and alone charged fiercely down the glen. Bright gleamed his blade And terribly flashed his eye. Tearing apart the shrubbery that held the foe in concealment, lie dragged him to the light, and beheld—an astonished hospital nurse in quest of water. Thus ended the ever memorable event known in our company as the battle of Benson's Hill, so called, from the name of the man on whose farm it might have occurred; on which occasion we seemed in all but numbers like the King of France, as sung by Mother Goose, who with forty thousand men marched up a hill and then marched down again. We returned to camp at noon; but our troubles did not end here. Gen. Lee was now fairly launched on his great invasion of the North, and our isolated position seemed one fraught with much danger. Now and then the sound of distant cannonading told of cavalry contests between opposing armies as both were pressing northward, but we could hear nothing definite about what was actually taking
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
eported for quarters. March 23. Corporal Conant (Currant)? returned from furlough. Ham, Thayer and Prince reported for quarters. Hiram P. Ring reported for duty. March 24. Brooks, Hanson, Barker and Norton sent to General Hospital, Washington, D. C. Han reported for duty. Corporal Stevens to quarters. March 26. Prince and Corporal Stevens returned to duty. Capt. Sleeper started for Washington on business. March 27. Received notice of R. B. Wendall's discharge Feb. 24. Princeextended sick furlough and reported for duty. June 16. Donnelly reported to quarters. June 17. Privates Damrell, Frost and Donnelly, and Sergeant Allard reported for duty. Corp'l Shattuck and Private Corlew sent to General Hospital, Washington, D. C. June 18. Millett reported to quarters. June 19. Millett reported for duty. June 20. Privates John Knowland, John Millett, Frank A. Chase, John W. Bailey reported to quarters. June 21. Privates Knowland, Millett, Chase and Bail
Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ficates of indebtedness were given to the owner, furnished supper for the horses and excellent beds for many of us, while others slept between the folds of the tarpaulins. These latter were large squares of canvas used to cover the guns and caissons. They were frequently employed afterwards for a night's shelter when on the march, as they afforded protection from storms, and could be folded and strapped upon the limbers at short notice. Passing on through Darnestown, Tenallytown, and Rockville, we bivouacked one more night, and the next day, Sunday, Dec. 28, about 11 o'clock A. M., arrived at Poolsville. This was a little settlement, of strong secession proclivities, on the upper Potoillac, near Edwards Ferry, interesting as the scene of frequent guerrilla raids. In the most recent of these Maj. White and a party of his followers, who belonged in this neighborhood, had surprised and captured a body of fifty or seventy-five Union cavalry one evening while they were at church in
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