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A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 13
Stuart described as a model of worth, devotion and heroism, lost his life in the attack. General Gordon and Major Barringer were both wounded, but continued on duty. Sheer hard fighting alone extricated Stuart. General Lee crossed the Rapidan early in October and moved toward Culpeper Court House, with a view of bringing on an engagement with the Federal army. Lee's Report. General Meade, however, retreated before Lee, and the Confederate army moved on toward Bristoe Station. Gen. A. P. Hill's corps reached that point first, and, on the 14th, brought on an engagement with Warren's Second corps. This was almost entirely, on the Confederate side, a North Carolina battle; for the two brigades that did nearly all the fighting were both from that State. Just before reaching Bristoe, General Heth, commanding the advance division, was ordered to form line of battle on the road from Greenwich. Accordingly Cooke's North Carolina brigade was formed on the right of the road; Kir
D. R. Jones (search for this): chapter 13
id, drove it from his front. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. As the Confederates moved up the Madison pike toward Gordonsville, the First North Carolina regiment in advance encountered Davies' dismounted skirmishers posted in some pines. Lieutenant Foard, of the advance guard, bravely charged in to ascertain the forces of the enemy, and, on his re
Joseph Graham (search for this): chapter 13
time been captured, but they were hopelessly cut off from the bridge without any means of escape and with no chance of being reinforced; and while making preparations to defend the bridge and prevent an increase of the disaster, I had the mortification to hear the final struggle of these devoted men, and to be made painfully aware of their capture without the possibility of being able to go to their relief. Eight hundred and forty-seven men of this brigade were thus made prisoners. Capt. Joseph Graham's North Carolina battery, posted on the Confederate side of the river, made continuous efforts to direct a successful fire upon the assailants of its comrades across the river. On this same date, the Federals succeeded in crossing the Rappahannock at Kelly's ford notwithstanding the efforts of Rodes' division, which was guarding several fords along the river, to prevent it. The troops most actively engaged at Kelly's ford were the Second North Carolina, commanded at the opening of
J. T. Weaver (search for this): chapter 13
tested field. One corps commander, D. H. Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasman; the Thirty-ninth, Col. David Coleman; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Sixtieth, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Ray and Capt. J. T. Weaver, and the Sixth cavalry, Col. G. N. Folk. How nobly these five regiments upheld the, honor of their State is so clearly set forth in a personal letter to the author from Col. C. A. Cilley, a Federal staff officer of the Second Minnesota regiment, that no further memorial to their valor is needed. The testimony has the added value of coming from a generous foe who stoutly fought these regiments, and whose official position has since put him in possession of all the facts bearing upon
ccupied by the Federals. Lieut.-Col. M. A. Haynes says in his official report: With a shout and a hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag, the North Carolina boys made the charge, and the enemy fled before them, as you and the general well know. The artillery and the infantry joining in a general attack, 314 prisoners surrendered and many were killed and wounded. The North Carolina loss was 6 killed and 15 wounded. Shortly afterward the Sixty-ninth regiment encountered a large cavalry force under Foster. This cavalry had been sent to intercept the Confederate retreat toward Virginia. Colonel Love gallantly charged this force, and General Williams coming to his aid, drove it from his front. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer'
vent it. The troops most actively engaged at Kelly's ford were the Second North Carolina, commanded at the opening of the affair by Colonel Cox, then, upon that officer's being wounded, by Lieutenant-Colonel Stallings, and the Thirtieth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Sillers commanding. Colonel Sillers also received a terrible wound. The North Carolina losses in these engagements were: killed, 6; wounded, 109. The most serious infantry engagement during the November movements was at Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The Third North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, sustained the heaviest loss in the division—72 men. The First North Carolina, Colonel Thruston, suffered next in casualties. His regiment and the Fourth Virginia each lost 55 men. The brigades of Hoke, Daniel
C. A. Cilley (search for this): chapter 13
. Palmer; the Sixtieth, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Ray and Capt. J. T. Weaver, and the Sixth cavalry, Col. G. N. Folk. How nobly these five regiments upheld the, honor of their State is so clearly set forth in a personal letter to the author from Col. C. A. Cilley, a Federal staff officer of the Second Minnesota regiment, that no further memorial to their valor is needed. The testimony has the added value of coming from a generous foe who stoutly fought these regiments, and whose official position hhe State commission appointed to examine and decide, conjointly with and under direction of the National Park commission, upon the achievements of all the troops engaged, and to direct the erection of tablets to commemorate valiant exploits. Colonel Cilley's letter is as follows: There were present at that battle the Sixth cavalry, the Twenty-ninth, Thirty-ninth, Fifty-eighth, and Sixtieth infantry. The fortunes of the day so ordered it that I was personally aware of the conduct of all sav
E. D. Hall (search for this): chapter 13
advance. As General Cooke marched to the attack, his Carolina regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, thvery one of their shots told. Almost at the first volley, General Cooke and Colonel Gilmer were seriously wounded. Col. E. D. Hall succeeded to the command of the brigade. Colonel Hall, seeing how rapidly his command was falling, rushed to the ceColonel Hall, seeing how rapidly his command was falling, rushed to the center and ordered the firing to cease and a charge to be made. The Twenty-seventh led off, followed by the other regiments. The point from which we started the charge, says Graham, was distinctly marked; in some cases ten men from each company l of Northern Virginia. in this action, which lasted only about forty minutes. The Twenty-seventh regiment, which, says Colonel Hall, went further than any other of his regiments, lost 204 out of 426 taken into action. Kirkland's brigade was not ca
of the National commission then present, viz: Lieutenant-General Stewart, late of the Confederate States army, and Brevet Brigadier-General Boynton, late Thirty-fifth Ohio. In marking, the next day, the location occupied by the North Carolina troops, we had their full concurrence and approval. As soon as General Bragg discovered that Rosecrans had gained the main road from Lafayette to Chattanooga, and was marching up the same toward the town he had just been maneuvered out of, he sent Forrest, followed up by infantry under Ector, to dislodge us. To meet this attack, General Thomas detached Vanderveer's brigade of his old division, in which General Boynton commanded a brigade, and on the staff of which I was serving—my regiment, the Second Minnesota, being in the command. So two of the party which traversed the field and marked the points reached by the North Carolina troops had met them in actual conflict. It was agreed that the Sixth cavalry gained an honorable position on th
d troops made ready for the assault. General Seymour commanded the Federal division, made up of Strong's, Putnam's and Stevenson's brigades. General Strong's brigade was in advance. His leading regGeneral Strong's brigade was in advance. His leading regiment was the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, a negro regiment commanded by white officers. During the bombardment, the Confederate troops had been partly protected in the bombproofs. They now, although, they, General Seymour reported, fell harshly upon those in their rear. The other regiments of Strong's brigade continued their forward movement, but fell in heaps before the riflemen of the two Carolinas. Two of General Strong's regiments had been affected by the panic of the negro regiment, and soon the whole First brigade was routed. General Strong was mortally wounded. Meantime Putnam'sGeneral Strong was mortally wounded. Meantime Putnam's brigade, after some delay, was daringly led by him against the left of the fort. This part of Wagner had been assigned to the Thirty-first North Carolina. That regiment, however, General Taliaferro
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