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orth Carolinians in Mississippi the battle of Chickamauga east Tennessee campaigning North Carolina cavalry in Virginia infantry engagements around Rappahannock Station fights at Kelly's ford, Bristoe and Payne's Farm. On the 16th of July, Clingman's brigade, consisting of the following North Carolina regiments, the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; the Thirty-first, Lieut.-Col. C. W. Knight; the Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan; the Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane and Major Harding, was ordered to South Carolina to assist in the defense of Charleston harbor. The brigade arrived on the 13th, and was at once assigned to duty. The Fifty-first and Thirty-first became members of the garrison at Fort Wagner. The Eighth and Sixty-first went to James island. At Battery Wagner the garrison endured many hardships, suffering a constant cannonade from land batteries and ironclads, and being exposed to an alert sharpshooter force at all hours. In addition, the water was ba
G. N. Folk (search for this): chapter 13
Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasman; the Thirty-ninth, Col. David Coleman; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Sixtieth, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Ray and Capt. J. T. Weaver, and the Sixth cavalry, Col. G. N. Folk. How nobly these five regiments upheld the, honor of their State is so clearly set forth in a personal letter to the author from Col. C. A. Cilley, a Federal staff officer of the Second Minnesota regiment, that no further memorial to their valor is needed. The testimony has the added value of coming from a generous foe who stoutly fought these regiments, and whose official position has since put him in possession of all the facts bearing upon the successes attained by the troops fro
This being done, Lee was to come in from Auburn and attack in flank and rear while Stuart attacked in front. General Stuart's report tells the sequel: This plan proved highly successful. Kilpatrick followed me cautiously until I reached the point in question, when the sound of artillery toward Buckland indicating that Major-General Lee had arrived and commenced the attack, I pressed upon them suddenly and vigorously in front, with Gordon [North Carolina brigade] in the center and Young and Rosser on his flanks. The enemy at first offered a stubborn resistance, but the charge was made with such impetuosity, the First North Carolina gallantly leading, that the enemy broke and the rout was soon complete. I pursued them from within three miles of Warrenton to Buckland, the horses going at full speed the whole distance. General Stuart quotes from a Northern writer, who speaks of Kilpatrick's retreat as the deplorable spectacle of the cavalry dashing hatless and panic-stricken through t
C. W. Knight (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 12: Defense of Charleston North Carolinians in Mississippi the battle of Chickamauga east Tennessee campaigning North Carolina cavalry in Virginia infantry engagements around Rappahannock Station fights at Kelly's ford, Bristoe and Payne's Farm. On the 16th of July, Clingman's brigade, consisting of the following North Carolina regiments, the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; the Thirty-first, Lieut.-Col. C. W. Knight; the Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan; the Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane and Major Harding, was ordered to South Carolina to assist in the defense of Charleston harbor. The brigade arrived on the 13th, and was at once assigned to duty. The Fifty-first and Thirty-first became members of the garrison at Fort Wagner. The Eighth and Sixty-first went to James island. At Battery Wagner the garrison endured many hardships, suffering a constant cannonade from land batteries and ironclads, and being exposed to an alert sharpshooter for
S. H. Walkup (search for this): chapter 13
artillery. The railroad cut and embankment gave him perfect protection for his infantry. Two batteries of Ricketts—Brown and Arnold—occupied these advantageous positions and swept the slope down which the Confederates had to advance. As General Cooke marched to the attack, his Carolina regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Fifty-second, Lieut.-Col. B. F. Little, were on the left; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Lane, the Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary, and the Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault, on the right Cooke's men, on the right, stepped to the front with boldness and began the descent of the slope. Then for the first time they saw the enemy's real line of battle; but their orders w
Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 13
e county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigadedenominated by the Confederate troopers, the Buckland Races, occurred on the 18th. General Stuart, who was in front of Kilpatrick's division, received a note from General Fitzhugh Lee stating that he was moving to join his commander, and suggesting nd rear while Stuart attacked in front. General Stuart's report tells the sequel: This plan proved highly successful. Kilpatrick followed me cautiously until I reached the point in question, when the sound of artillery toward Buckland indicating thckland, the horses going at full speed the whole distance. General Stuart quotes from a Northern writer, who speaks of Kilpatrick's retreat as the deplorable spectacle of the cavalry dashing hatless and panic-stricken through the ranks of the infant
ff of which I was serving—my regiment, the Second Minnesota, being in the command. So two of the party which traversed the field and marked the points reached by the North Carolina troops had met them in actual conflict. It was agreed that the Sixth cavalry gained an honorable position on the right of the Confederate line, closely followed by the Twenty-ninth infantry, who fought over substantially the same ground. Col. David Coleman, of the Thirty-ninth infantry, who assumed command of McNair's brigade after that officer was wounded on Sunday evening, reported that his regiment charged and captured a massed collection of nine cannon in Dyer's field, during what was known as the great break through the Federal lines, late on Sunday. Other commanders, after the battle, put in a claim to this capture, and asked the National commission to so credit them on the memorial to be erected. We carefully collated all evidence on both sides, and at last General Stewart directed us to put up
W. B. Creasman (search for this): chapter 13
e island and return to their native State. The brigade loss during its service in South Carolina was: killed, 76; wounded, 336. Three North Carolina regiments served under J. E. Johnston in Mississippi. These were the Twenty-ninth, Lieut.-Col. W. B. Creasman, the Thirty-ninth and the Sixtieth. On the Yazoo river, near Yazoo City, the Twenty-ninth had, on the 13th of July, an all-day skirmish with gunboats. In the same month, the Sixtieth regiment was engaged in actions of some severity bethe command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasman; the Thirty-ninth, Col. David Coleman; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Sixtieth, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Ray and Capt. J. T. Weaver, and the Sixth cavalry, Col. G. N. Folk. How nobly these five regiments upheld the, honor of their St
by Colonel Cox, then, upon that officer's being wounded, by Lieutenant-Colonel Stallings, and the Thirtieth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Sillers commanding. Colonel Sillers also received a terrible wound. The North Carolina losses in these engagements were: killed, 6; wounded, 109. The most serious infantry engagement during the November movements was at Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The Third North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, sustained the heaviest loss in the division—72 men. The First North Carolina, Colonel Thruston, suffered next in casualties. His regiment and the Fourth Virginia each lost 55 men. The brigades of Hoke, Daniel and Ramseur were several times under fire, but not seriously engaged. The total North Carolina casualties in the infantry were:
W. H. F. Lee (search for this): chapter 13
nd Lieutenants Baker of the Second and Benton of the Fourth were killed. On the same day, Gen. W. H. F. Lee with his cavalry force and Johnston's North Carolina brigade commanded by Colonel Garrett night. Gordon's Report. A few bold men ran the gauntlet of the Federal lines to take word to General Lee of the perilous situation of his cavalry. At dawn a dense, fog prevented a disclosure of Stuer were both wounded, but continued on duty. Sheer hard fighting alone extricated Stuart. General Lee crossed the Rapidan early in October and moved toward Culpeper Court House, with a view of bringing on an engagement with the Federal army. Lee's Report. General Meade, however, retreated before Lee, and the Confederate army moved on toward Bristoe Station. Gen. A. P. Hill's corps reachLee, and the Confederate army moved on toward Bristoe Station. Gen. A. P. Hill's corps reached that point first, and, on the 14th, brought on an engagement with Warren's Second corps. This was almost entirely, on the Confederate side, a North Carolina battle; for the two brigades that did
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