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d at Kelly's ford were the Second North Carolina, commanded at the opening of the affair by Colonel Cox, then, upon that officer's being wounded, by Lieutenant-Colonel Stallings, and the Thirtieth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Sillers commanding. Colonel Sillers also received a terrible wound. The North Carolina losses in these engagements were: killed, 6; wounded, 109. The most serious infantry engagement during the November movements was at Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The Third North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, sustained the heaviest loss in the division—72 men. The First North Carolina, Colonel Thruston, suffered next in casualties. His regiment and the Fourth Virginia each lost 55 men. The brigades of Hoke, Daniel and Ramseur were several times under fir
September 20th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 13
and Chattanooga, charged with Stovall's brigade, in which was the Sixtieth North Carolina infantry. Two of our number were in the brigade which received that attack, and had good reason for remembering it. Again reports and maps were brought out, and one of the party paced the distance. General Stewart collated the evidence and announced the decision. By his direction, an oaken tablet, suitably inscribed, was put up on the side of the State road, marking the spot where at noon on Sunday, September 20, 1863, the Sixtieth regiment reached the farthest point within the Federal lines attained by any Southern troops in that famous charge. Fourth and last. It remained only to ascertain the facts as to the conduct of the Fifty-eighth North Carolina infantry, a regiment until that battle never under fire. We followed its course from where it entered the field to the scene of its splendid achievement on Snodgrass hill. Three of our State commissioners were survivors of that regiment, an
ism, lost his life in the attack. General Gordon and Major Barringer were both wounded, but continued on duty. Sheer hard fighting alone extricated Stuart. General Lee crossed the Rapidan early in October and moved toward Culpeper Court House, with a view of bringing on an engagement with the Federal army. Lee's Report. General Meade, however, retreated before Lee, and the Confederate army moved on toward Bristoe Station. Gen. A. P. Hill's corps reached that point first, and, on the 14th, brought on an engagement with Warren's Second corps. This was almost entirely, on the Confederate side, a North Carolina battle; for the two brigades that did nearly all the fighting were both from that State. Just before reaching Bristoe, General Heth, commanding the advance division, was ordered to form line of battle on the road from Greenwich. Accordingly Cooke's North Carolina brigade was formed on the right of the road; Kirkland's brigade, also North Carolinians, was formed to Co
Lieut.-Col. C. W. Knight; the Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan; the Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane and Major Harding, was ordered to South Carolina to assist in the defense of Charleston harbor. The brigade arrived on the 13th, and was at once assigned to duty. The Fifty-first and Thirty-first became members of the garrison at Fort Wagner. The Eighth and Sixty-first went to James island. At Battery Wagner the garrison endured many hardships, suffering a constant cannharged in flank by the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, and broke in considerable confusion. The brigade took no further active [part in the] operations during the day. While making a reconnaissance toward Catlett's Station on the night of the 13th, General Stuart suddenly found himself and command enveloped by a marching corps of Federal infantry. His situation was extremely critical, and a less resourceful commander would most probably have been captured. He, however, concealed his men i
August 28th (search for this): chapter 13
ad to keep under cover of the battery or in sandpits near by. Under such circumstances it was necessary to relieve the men once about every seven or eight days. . . There was no place for cooking. All the rations had to be prepared and carried there. . . It was a veritable target practice between the sharpshooters every day, and any careless or reckless exposure meant work for the ambulance corps. All of General Clingman's regiments took their regular tours of duty at Wagner. On the 28th of August, an infantry assault on the rifle-pits in front of Wagner was bravely met and repulsed by the two Confederate regiments there. General Taliaferro reports: Soon after dark he advanced upon the rifle-pits in front of Wagner, but General Hagood's forces were, fortunately, prepared to receive him. His mortar practice ceased and his infantry assaulted fiercely, but the position was held with courage and spirit, and success crowned the efforts of the brave men of the Sixty-first North Carolin
September 19th (search for this): chapter 13
oo City, the Twenty-ninth had, on the 13th of July, an all-day skirmish with gunboats. In the same month, the Sixtieth regiment was engaged in actions of some severity before Jackson. These regiments were greater sufferers from the hardships of campaigning than they were from battle casualties, as it was their lot not to be engaged during this time in serious battle. The Great Battle of the West was fought near Chickamauga. There the Confederate army, under General Bragg, gained, on the 19th and 20th of September, a great, but entirely barren victory. North Carolina was not largely represented in this bitterly-contested field. One corps commander, D. H. Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasm
October 25th, 1893 AD (search for this): chapter 13
nth, Thirty-ninth, Fifty-eighth, and Sixtieth infantry. The fortunes of the day so ordered it that I was personally aware of the conduct of all save the Thirty-ninth regiment. As to that, the published reports, aided by the decision of the United States Park Commission in a contest between the troops who claimed to have captured a number of cannon also claimed by the Thirty-ninth, must be the authority for whatsoever I say. On the meeting of our State commission at the battlefield, October 25, 1893, we went over all available maps and reports of the action and the territory with the two members of the National commission then present, viz: Lieutenant-General Stewart, late of the Confederate States army, and Brevet Brigadier-General Boynton, late Thirty-fifth Ohio. In marking, the next day, the location occupied by the North Carolina troops, we had their full concurrence and approval. As soon as General Bragg discovered that Rosecrans had gained the main road from Lafayette to
September 22nd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 13
th Carolina loss was 6 killed and 15 wounded. Shortly afterward the Sixty-ninth regiment encountered a large cavalry force under Foster. This cavalry had been sent to intercept the Confederate retreat toward Virginia. Colonel Love gallantly charged this force, and General Williams coming to his aid, drove it from his front. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and F
September 20th (search for this): chapter 13
nty-ninth had, on the 13th of July, an all-day skirmish with gunboats. In the same month, the Sixtieth regiment was engaged in actions of some severity before Jackson. These regiments were greater sufferers from the hardships of campaigning than they were from battle casualties, as it was their lot not to be engaged during this time in serious battle. The Great Battle of the West was fought near Chickamauga. There the Confederate army, under General Bragg, gained, on the 19th and 20th of September, a great, but entirely barren victory. North Carolina was not largely represented in this bitterly-contested field. One corps commander, D. H. Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasman; the Thirty-
with courage and spirit, and success crowned the efforts of the brave men of the Sixty-first North Carolina and Fifty-fourth Georgia regiments, who constituted the advance pickets and reserve. Circumstances in North Carolina were such that, in November, Clingman's men gladly received orders to leave tire island and return to their native State. The brigade loss during its service in South Carolina was: killed, 76; wounded, 336. Three North Carolina regiments served under J. E. Johnston in e Thirtieth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Sillers commanding. Colonel Sillers also received a terrible wound. The North Carolina losses in these engagements were: killed, 6; wounded, 109. The most serious infantry engagement during the November movements was at Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carol
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