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Greenwich (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
er, retreated before Lee, and the Confederate army moved on toward Bristoe Station. Gen. A. P. Hill's corps reached that point first, and, on the 14th, brought on an engagement with Warren's Second corps. This was almost entirely, on the Confederate side, a North Carolina battle; for the two brigades that did nearly all the fighting were both from that State. Just before reaching Bristoe, General Heth, commanding the advance division, was ordered to form line of battle on the road from Greenwich. Accordingly Cooke's North Carolina brigade was formed on the right of the road; Kirkland's brigade, also North Carolinians, was formed to Cooke's left, and Walker's brigade was directed to move to Kirkland's left; but Cooke and Kirkland, having formed, were ordered forward before Walker could reach his post. Davis was held in reserve. A Federal force was soon discovered in Kirkland's front, but one of Poague's batteries caused it to retire, and General Heth was ordered to cross Broad
R. G. A. Love (search for this): chapter 13
nd a hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag, the North Carolina boys made the charge, and the enemy fled before them, as you and the general well know. The artillery and the infantry joining in a general attack, 314 prisoners surrendered and many were killed and wounded. The North Carolina loss was 6 killed and 15 wounded. Shortly afterward the Sixty-ninth regiment encountered a large cavalry force under Foster. This cavalry had been sent to intercept the Confederate retreat toward Virginia. Colonel Love gallantly charged this force, and General Williams coming to his aid, drove it from his front. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades:
Thomas Davis (search for this): chapter 13
the fighting were both from that State. Just before reaching Bristoe, General Heth, commanding the advance division, was ordered to form line of battle on the road from Greenwich. Accordingly Cooke's North Carolina brigade was formed on the right of the road; Kirkland's brigade, also North Carolinians, was formed to Cooke's left, and Walker's brigade was directed to move to Kirkland's left; but Cooke and Kirkland, having formed, were ordered forward before Walker could reach his post. Davis was held in reserve. A Federal force was soon discovered in Kirkland's front, but one of Poague's batteries caused it to retire, and General Heth was ordered to cross Broad run to follow up Poague's success. It was not known to the Confederate commander that the Federals were in force across the run; for their lines were marching parallel to a railroad that concealed them from sight. Cooke and Kirkland advanced, and no opportunity offered Walker to form on line with them. They encountere
G. B. Singeltary (search for this): chapter 13
al Cooke marched to the attack, his Carolina regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Fifty-second, Lieut.-Col. B. F. Little, were on the left; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Lane, the Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary, and the Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault, on the right Cooke's men, on the right, stepped to the front with boldness and began the descent of the slope. Then for the first time they saw the enemy's real line of battle; but their orders were to break it if possible. The batteries speedily got their range and the infantry fire was incessant. As they fired up the hill, says Capt. J. A. Graham, every one of their shots told. Almost at the first volley, General Cooke and Colonel Gil
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 13
near Chickamauga. There the Confederate army, under General Bragg, gained, on the 19th and 20th of September, a great, but entirely barren victory. North Carolina was not largely represented in this bitterly-contested field. One corps commander, D. H. Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days ofreported it. This was the only case in which both General Boynton and myself were not personally cognizant of each achievement of North Carolina troops as set forth in the tablet erected. Next in order of time was the attack by Breckinridge (of Hill's corps) upon the right. Brannan's division of Thomas' corps had made a lodgment on the road to Chattanooga at Kelly's field, when Breckinridge, who had attained a position on the road between Brannan and Chattanooga, charged with Stovall's briga
James B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 13
rce, and General Williams coming to his aid, drove it from his front. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. As the Confederates moved up the Madison pike toward Gordonsville, the First North Carolina regiment in advance encountered Davies' dismounted skirmishers posted in some pines. Lieutenant Foard, of the advance guard, bravely charged in to ascertai
attack in flank and rear while Stuart attacked in front. General Stuart's report tells the sequel: This plan proved highly successful. Kilpatrick followed me cautiously until I reached the point in question, when the sound of artillery toward Buckland indicating that Major-General Lee had arrived and commenced the attack, I pressed upon them suddenly and vigorously in front, with Gordon [North Carolina brigade] in the center and Young and Rosser on his flanks. The enemy at first offered a stubborn resistance, but the charge was made with such impetuosity, the First North Carolina gallantly leading, that the enemy broke and the rout was soon complete. I pursued them from within three miles of Warrenton to Buckland, the horses going at full speed the whole distance. General Stuart quotes from a Northern writer, who speaks of Kilpatrick's retreat as the deplorable spectacle of the cavalry dashing hatless and panic-stricken through the ranks of the infantry. In the operations arou
of the time, Gen. Robert Ransom operated in some of the same territory. Gen. A. E. Jackson with Walker's battalion, portions of the Sixty-ninth North Carolina, and other troops, including artillery, right of the road; Kirkland's brigade, also North Carolinians, was formed to Cooke's left, and Walker's brigade was directed to move to Kirkland's left; but Cooke and Kirkland, having formed, were ordered forward before Walker could reach his post. Davis was held in reserve. A Federal force was soon discovered in Kirkland's front, but one of Poague's batteries caused it to retire, and General ailroad that concealed them from sight. Cooke and Kirkland advanced, and no opportunity offered Walker to form on line with them. They encountered General Warren's Second corps drawn up along a line. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The
t. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. As the Confederates moved up the Madison pike toward Gordonsville, the First North Carolina regiment in advance encountered Davies' dismounted skirmishers posted in some pines. Lieutenant Foard, of the advance guard, bravely charged in to ascertain the forces of the enemy, and, on his report, the First regiment wa
; for their lines were marching parallel to a railroad that concealed them from sight. Cooke and Kirkland advanced, and no opportunity offered Walker to form on line with them. They encountered General Warren's Second corps drawn up along a line of railroad. The Federal forces that these two brigades were ordered to attack were posted in a low cut almost perfectly sheltering the men, and behind an embankment forming equally good protection. Hays' division, consisting of the brigades of Smyth, Carroll and Owen, held the center. On his right was Webb's division, made up of Heath's and Mallon's brigades—Baxter not being present. Caldwell's division was on Hays' left, but the Confederate front was not long enough to reach his position, and only his skirmishers were engaged. Miles' brigade of Caldwell's division was supporting the artillery. The Federal brigades most severely engaged were those of Heath, Mallon and Owen. Against these two divisions the two North Carolina briga
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