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Louis G. Young (search for this): chapter 13
more general. Colonel Ferebee, with a mixed force, charged through the line of Federals moving to the Confederate rear, and the Federals began to draw off. Soon, however, their lines were re-established and their artillery opened. General Stuart then ordered a general charge, and the Federal force was driven off the field, and Colonel Stagg's rear cut off and captured. Gordon's cavalry brigade attacked, near James City, on the 10th, the front of a cavalry force while General Stuart led Young's brigade to make a flank attack. The Federals were driven into James City, but Stuart found the cavalry and infantry there too strong for his force, and he made no attack. On the 11th of October, the Fourth North Carolina cavalry dispersed a cavalry force at Culpeper Court House. In this charge, Colonel Ferebee and Adjutant Morehead of the Fifth were wounded, and Lieutenants Baker of the Second and Benton of the Fourth were killed. On the same day, Gen. W. H. F. Lee with his cavalry f
W. H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 13
, followed up by infantry under Ector, to dislodge us. To meet this attack, General Thomas detached Vanderveer's brigade of his old division, in which General Boyntonattack by Breckinridge (of Hill's corps) upon the right. Brannan's division of Thomas' corps had made a lodgment on the road to Chattanooga at Kelly's field, when Brooded hill, up which Longstreet had hurled six divisions in an attempt to drive Thomas to retreat, and so secure the coveted State road. The slopes up which it toithe topmost wave of Southern battle broke nearer than any other to the lines of Thomas' defense, was erected in honor and in the name of the Fifty-eighth North Caroliuitable monuments to the valor of their sons. As I personally took word to General Thomas on two or three occasions that the men who held our line were out of cartriIn the East Tennessee campaign, the Sixty-second, Sixty-fourth and Sixty-ninth (Thomas' legion) were engaged in the mountain fights in the summer and fall of 1863. P
er's brigade was directed to move to Kirkland's left; but Cooke and Kirkland, having formed, were ordered forward before Walker could reach his post. Davis was held in reserve. A Federal force was soon discovered in Kirkland's front, but one of Poague's batteries caused it to retire, and General Heth was ordered to cross Broad run to follow up Poague's success. It was not known to the Confederate commander that the Federals were in force across the run; for their lines were marching parallel Poague's success. It was not known to the Confederate commander that the Federals were in force across the run; for their lines were marching parallel to a railroad that concealed them from sight. Cooke and Kirkland advanced, and no opportunity offered Walker to form on line with them. They encountered General Warren's Second corps drawn up along a line of railroad. The Federal forces that these two brigades were ordered to attack were posted in a low cut almost perfectly sheltering the men, and behind an embankment forming equally good protection. Hays' division, consisting of the brigades of Smyth, Carroll and Owen, held the center. O
a regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Fifty-second, Lieut.-Col. B. F. Little, were on the left; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Lane, the Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary, and the Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault, on the right Cooke's men, on the right, stepped to the front with boldness and began the descent of the slope. Then for the first time they saw the enemy's real line of battle; but their orders were to break it if possible. The batteries speedily got their range and the infantry fire was incessant. As they fired up the hill, says Capt. J. A. Graham, every one of their shots told. Almost at the first volley, General Cooke and Colonel Gilmer were seriously wounded. Col. E. D. Ha
M. A. Haynes (search for this): chapter 13
3. Part of the time, Gen. Robert Ransom operated in some of the same territory. Gen. A. E. Jackson with Walker's battalion, portions of the Sixty-ninth North Carolina, and other troops, including artillery, routed and captured a Federal force, commanded by Colonel Hayes of the One Hundredth Ohio regiment, at Limestone bridge. After a reconnoissance made by Maj. W. W. Stringfield, General Jackson ordered an assault upon the blockhouse and brick buildings occupied by the Federals. Lieut.-Col. M. A. Haynes says in his official report: With a shout and a hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag, the North Carolina boys made the charge, and the enemy fled before them, as you and the general well know. The artillery and the infantry joining in a general attack, 314 prisoners surrendered and many were killed and wounded. The North Carolina loss was 6 killed and 15 wounded. Shortly afterward the Sixty-ninth regiment encountered a large cavalry force under Foster. This cavalry had been sent to in
two North Carolina brigades, under the protest of General Cooke, gallantly advanced. General Heth says of the Federal position: On seeing our advance, the enemy formed his line in rear of the railroad embankment, his right resting on Broad run and hidden by a railroad cut. In his rear, a line of hills ascended to some 30 or 40 feet in height, giving him an admirable position for his artillery. The railroad cut and embankment gave him perfect protection for his infantry. Two batteries of Ricketts—Brown and Arnold—occupied these advantageous positions and swept the slope down which the Confederates had to advance. As General Cooke marched to the attack, his Carolina regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colone
J. B. Palmer (search for this): chapter 13
h Carolina was not largely represented in this bitterly-contested field. One corps commander, D. H. Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasman; the Thirty-ninth, Col. David Coleman; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Sixtieth, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Ray and Capt. J. T. Weaver, and the Sixth cavalry, Col. G. N. Folk. How nobly these five regiments upheld the, honor of their State is so clearly set forth in a personal letter to the author from Col. C. A. Cilley, a Federal staff officer of the Second Minnesota regiment, that no further memorial to their valor is needed. The testimony has the added value of coming from a generous foe who stoutly fought these regiments, and whose official position h
Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The Third North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, sustained the heaviest loss in the division—72 men. The First North Carolina, Colonel Thruston, suffered next in casualties. His regiment and the Fourth Virginia each lost 55 men. The brigades of Hoke, Daniel and Ramseur were several times under fire, but not seriously engaged. The total North Carolina casualties in the infantry were: killed, 17; wounded, 138. Gordon's cavalry brigade had a skirmish at New Hope church, and took part in a sharp action at Parker's store. The Second North Carolina and a portion of the Fifth, all under command of Captain Reese, made a successful dismounted attack on the Federal skirmishers. In this affair, Captain Reese and Lieutenant Copeland were killed.
, as it was their lot not to be engaged during this time in serious battle. The Great Battle of the West was fought near Chickamauga. There the Confederate army, under General Bragg, gained, on the 19th and 20th of September, a great, but entirely barren victory. North Carolina was not largely represented in this bitterly-contested field. One corps commander, D. H. Hill, who had recently been appointed lieutenant-general and assigned to the command of the divisions of Breckinridge and Cleburne, and five regiments—four of infantry and one of cavalry —were the North Carolina participants in the two days of bloodshed. These five regiments were as follows: The Twenty-ninth, Col. W. B. Creasman; the Thirty-ninth, Col. David Coleman; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Sixtieth, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Ray and Capt. J. T. Weaver, and the Sixth cavalry, Col. G. N. Folk. How nobly these five regiments upheld the, honor of their State is so clearly set forth in a personal letter to th
A. B. Andrews (search for this): chapter 13
d Fifth. As the Confederates moved up the Madison pike toward Gordonsville, the First North Carolina regiment in advance encountered Davies' dismounted skirmishers posted in some pines. Lieutenant Foard, of the advance guard, bravely charged in to ascertain the forces of the enemy, and, on his report, the First regiment was soon dismounted, and sharpshooters from every company engaged, Major Cheek commanding in front. The fire from the Federal sharpshooters was very accurate, and Capt. A. B. Andrews, while gallantly performing his duty, was shot through the body, and many others were shot down. The action then became more general. Colonel Ferebee, with a mixed force, charged through the line of Federals moving to the Confederate rear, and the Federals began to draw off. Soon, however, their lines were re-established and their artillery opened. General Stuart then ordered a general charge, and the Federal force was driven off the field, and Colonel Stagg's rear cut off and capt
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