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Stephen Dodson Ramseur (search for this): chapter 13
Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The Third North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, sustained the heaviest loss in the division—72 men. The First North Carolina, Colonel Thruston, suffered next in casualties. His regiment and the Fourth Virginia each lost 55 men. The brigades of Hoke, Daniel and Ramseur were several times under fire, but not seriously engaged. The total North Carolina casualties in the infantry were: killed, 17; wounded, 138. Gordon's cavalry brigade had a skirmish at New Hope church, and took part in a sharp action at Parker's store. The Second North Carolina and a portion of the Fifth, all under command of Captain Reese, made a successful dismounted attack on the Federal skirmishers. In this affair, Captain Reese and Lieutenant Copeland were killed.
behind an embankment forming equally good protection. Hays' division, consisting of the brigades of Smyth, Carroll and Owen, held the center. On his right was Webb's division, made up of Heath's and Mallon's brigades—Baxter not being present. Caldwell's division was on Hays' left, but the Confederate front was not long enough to reach his position, and only his skirmishers were engaged. Miles' brigade of Caldwell's division was supporting the artillery. The Federal brigades most severely enCaldwell's division was supporting the artillery. The Federal brigades most severely engaged were those of Heath, Mallon and Owen. Against these two divisions the two North Carolina brigades, under the protest of General Cooke, gallantly advanced. General Heth says of the Federal position: On seeing our advance, the enemy formed his line in rear of the railroad embankment, his right resting on Broad run and hidden by a railroad cut. In his rear, a line of hills ascended to some 30 or 40 feet in height, giving him an admirable position for his artillery. The railroad cut and e
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 13
our State commissioners were survivors of that regiment, and, under their guidance, we easily traced the path from its first service, supporting batteries, across the field just traversed by the Thirty-ninth, to the place where, about the middle of the afternoon, this command, hitherto unused to hostile shot, plunged into the bloodiest struggle of the battle, and one of the deadliest conflicts of the war. There it was, at the base and up the slopes to the crest of the wooded hill, up which Longstreet had hurled six divisions in an attempt to drive Thomas to retreat, and so secure the coveted State road. The slopes up which it toiled, the ravines in which it fought, were again trodden by some of its old officers, while General Boynton and myself identified the place on the crest where the lines met. After the fullest examination, a tablet, stating that that was the point where the topmost wave of Southern battle broke nearer than any other to the lines of Thomas' defense, was erected
F. M. Parker (search for this): chapter 13
t Payne's farm, or Bartlett's mill, on the 27th. The Federals unexpectedly attacked Johnson's division. The main attack fell on Steuart's and Walker's brigades. Here again, as at Bristoe, the heaviest losses fell on North Carolina troops. The Third North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, sustained the heaviest loss in the division—72 men. The First North Carolina, Colonel Thruston, suffered next in casualties. His regiment and the Fourth Virginia each lost 55 men. The brigades of Hoke, Daniel and Ramseur were several times under fire, but not seriously engaged. The total North Carolina casualties in the infantry were: killed, 17; wounded, 138. Gordon's cavalry brigade had a skirmish at New Hope church, and took part in a sharp action at Parker's store. The Second North Carolina and a portion of the Fifth, all under command of Captain Reese, made a successful dismounted attack on the Federal skirmishers. In this affair, Captain Reese and Lieutenant Copeland were killed.
Garrett, crossed at Raccoon ford, and the Twentieth and five companies of the Twelfth crossed at Morton's ford, and followed the Federals to Stevensburg. These regiments succeeded in forcing the enemy to retire. The loss in the brigade was 4 killed and 38 wounded. At Brandy Station, General Gordon reports: Near Bradford's house I sent the First North Carolina cavalry to attack the enemy in rear while we were moving on his flank. That command captured and killed 60 of the enemy. Near Mr. Bott's house, the Fourth and Fifth were charged in flank by the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, and broke in considerable confusion. The brigade took no further active [part in the] operations during the day. While making a reconnaissance toward Catlett's Station on the night of the 13th, General Stuart suddenly found himself and command enveloped by a marching corps of Federal infantry. His situation was extremely critical, and a less resourceful commander would most probably have been ca
J. D. Radcliffe (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 12: Defense of Charleston North Carolinians in Mississippi the battle of Chickamauga east Tennessee campaigning North Carolina cavalry in Virginia infantry engagements around Rappahannock Station fights at Kelly's ford, Bristoe and Payne's Farm. On the 16th of July, Clingman's brigade, consisting of the following North Carolina regiments, the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; the Thirty-first, Lieut.-Col. C. W. Knight; the Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan; the Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane and Major Harding, was ordered to South Carolina to assist in the defense of Charleston harbor. The brigade arrived on the 13th, and was at once assigned to duty. The Fifty-first and Thirty-first became members of the garrison at Fort Wagner. The Eighth and Sixty-first went to James island. At Battery Wagner the garrison endured many hardships, suffering a constant cannonade from land batteries and ironclads, and being exposed to an alert sharpshooter for
Lieutenants Baker (search for this): chapter 13
d Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. As the Confederates moved up the Madison pike toward Gordonsrong for his force, and he made no attack. On the 11th of October, the Fourth North Carolina cavalry dispersed a cavalry force at Culpeper Court House. In this charge, Colonel Ferebee and Adjutant Morehead of the Fifth were wounded, and Lieutenants Baker of the Second and Benton of the Fourth were killed. On the same day, Gen. W. H. F. Lee with his cavalry force and Johnston's North Carolina brigade commanded by Colonel Garrett of the Fifth regiment, opposed the crossing of Buford's caval
T. M. Garrett (search for this): chapter 13
Ferebee and Adjutant Morehead of the Fifth were wounded, and Lieutenants Baker of the Second and Benton of the Fourth were killed. On the same day, Gen. W. H. F. Lee with his cavalry force and Johnston's North Carolina brigade commanded by Colonel Garrett of the Fifth regiment, opposed the crossing of Buford's cavalry division at Morton's and Raccoon fords. The brigades of Buford that had crossed over were driven back. The Fifth, Twenty-third and five companies of the Twelfth regiment, under Colonel Garrett, crossed at Raccoon ford, and the Twentieth and five companies of the Twelfth crossed at Morton's ford, and followed the Federals to Stevensburg. These regiments succeeded in forcing the enemy to retire. The loss in the brigade was 4 killed and 38 wounded. At Brandy Station, General Gordon reports: Near Bradford's house I sent the First North Carolina cavalry to attack the enemy in rear while we were moving on his flank. That command captured and killed 60 of the enemy.
A. C. Godwin (search for this): chapter 13
e infantry. In the operations around Rappahannock Station, Hays' brigade occupied a tete-de-pont on the enemy's side of the Rappahannock. Hoke's brigade, now commanded during General Hoke's absence, from a severe wound, by Col. A. C. Godwin, was ordered to cross the river to reinforce Hays. There, on the 7th of November, these two brigades were completely surrounded by the Federal First and Second corps, and a large part of them forced to surrender in spite of the efforts of Hays and of Godwin, a splendid officer, to extricate them. General Early thus speaks of this unfortunate affair: Hoke's brigade had not at this time been captured, but they were hopelessly cut off from the bridge without any means of escape and with no chance of being reinforced; and while making preparations to defend the bridge and prevent an increase of the disaster, I had the mortification to hear the final struggle of these devoted men, and to be made painfully aware of their capture without the possibi
James Green Martin (search for this): chapter 13
on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Fifty-second, Lieut.-Col. B. F. Little, were on the left; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Lane, the Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary, and the Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault, on the right Cooke's men, on the right, stepped to theh and Fifty-second drove the Federals out of the cut and occupied it themselves. But they were exposed to a flank fire from infantry and an enfilade fire from artillery, and reluctantly gave up their advantage. General Kirkland was wounded, Colonel Martin was several times wounded, and a loss of 270 inflicted upon the brigade. General Warren in his official report bears testimony to the fearlessness of the North Carolina men in their attacks. He reports, the-enemy's line of battle boldly m
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