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arland in front (with a North Carolina brigade) attacked the hill with impetuous courage, but soon sent for reinforcements. The Sixth Georgia and the brigade of Toombs of Jones' division went to his assistance. General Hill in person accompanied the column. They approached the crest in handsome order, but discipline was of no avail to hold them there, much less to make them advance further. They soon retreated in disorder. Gordon had made a gallant advance and some progress, as also had Ripley and Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades. Peninsula Campaign, p. 160. The task was, however, too great for their unaided strength, and having done all that men dare do, they were driven back with frightful loss—a loss, perhaps, of not less than 2,000 men. Just as Hill drew off his shattered brigades, Magruder ordered in his forces on Hill's right. The brigades of Armistead, Wright, Mahone, G. T. Anderson, Cobb, Kershaw, Semmes, Ransom, Barksdale and Lawton threw themselves heavily, not a
and four lieutenants were also among the slain. The loss among the men was 140. The Sixteenth regiment, through an error of its guide, became separated from its brigade and was called upon to support another brigade. Always ready for a fight.Colonel McElroy did his part with skill and courage, and the regiment suffered a loss of about 200 men. No better example of the hotness of the fire to which these regiments were exposed can be found than in the losses of one of the companies. Captain Flowers, of the Thirty-eighth regiment, lost 27 men out of 32 taken into action. Lieutenant Cathey, of the Sixteenth regiment, describes the situation of the soldiers the night of the battle. He says: Our surroundings were deserts of solitary horror. The owls, night-hawks and foxes had fled in dismay; not even a snake or a frog could be heard to plunge into the lagoons which, crimsoned with the blood of men, lay motionless in our front. Nothing could be heard in the blackness of that nigh
er. Gordon had made a gallant advance and some progress, as also had Ripley and Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades. Peninsula Campaign, p. 160. The task was, however, too great for their unaided strength, and having done all that men dare do, they were driven back with frightful loss—a loss, perhaps, of not less than 2,000 men. Just as Hill drew off his shattered brigades, Magruder ordered in his forces on Hill's right. The brigades of Armistead, Wright, Mahone, G. T. Anderson, Cobb, Kershaw, Semmes, Ransom, Barksdale and Lawton threw themselves heavily, not all at once, but in succession, against their courageous and impregnably posted foes. Cobb's command included the Fifteenth North Carolina under Colonel Dowd. Ransom's brigade was solely a North Carolina one—the Twenty-fourth, Colonel Clark; the Twenty-fifth, Colonel Hill; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Vance; the Thirty-fifth, Colonel Ransom; the Forty-ninth, Colonel Ramseur. General Hill says of General Magruder's assault:
ions of other troops, advanced, as the division commander says, gallantly in the face of a murderous fire to the right of Field's advanced brigade. Under Pender's personal direction, Col. W. J. Hoke, of the Thirty-eighth, and Col. R. H. Riddick, ofwed by Pender with his North Carolinians, pressed eagerly forward. A. P. Hill says: General Pender, moving up to support Field, found that he had penetrated so far in advance that the enemy were between himself and Field. A regiment of Federals, mField. A regiment of Federals, moving across his front and exposing a flank, was scattered by a volley. Pender continued to move forward, driving off a battery of rifled pieces. It was the charge of Field and Pender that finally broke the obstinate line of McCall, to whose hard Field and Pender that finally broke the obstinate line of McCall, to whose hard fighting that day Longstreet pays this tribute: He was more tenacious of his battle than any one who came within my experience during the war, if I except D. H. Hill at Sharpsburg. The failure of all his officers to join Longstreet in this battle
Barksdale (search for this): chapter 6
lant advance and some progress, as also had Ripley and Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades. Peninsula Campaign, p. 160. The task was, however, too great for their unaided strength, and having done all that men dare do, they were driven back with frightful loss—a loss, perhaps, of not less than 2,000 men. Just as Hill drew off his shattered brigades, Magruder ordered in his forces on Hill's right. The brigades of Armistead, Wright, Mahone, G. T. Anderson, Cobb, Kershaw, Semmes, Ransom, Barksdale and Lawton threw themselves heavily, not all at once, but in succession, against their courageous and impregnably posted foes. Cobb's command included the Fifteenth North Carolina under Colonel Dowd. Ransom's brigade was solely a North Carolina one—the Twenty-fourth, Colonel Clark; the Twenty-fifth, Colonel Hill; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Vance; the Thirty-fifth, Colonel Ransom; the Forty-ninth, Colonel Ramseur. General Hill says of General Magruder's assault: I never saw anything mo
W. H. Toon (search for this): chapter 6
, however, before the noise of their battle and their shout of attack had produced confusion. Gen. D. H. Hill, hearing the noise of this attack, thought it was the preconcerted battle-signal, and obeying his orders, moved his five brigades into action. This division contained eleven North Carolina regiments, but on the day of this battle the Fourth and Fifth were absent on detail duty. In Garland's brigade were the Twelfth, Colonel Wade; the Thirteenth, Colonel Scales; the Twentieth, Maj. W. H. Toon; the Twenty-third, Lieut. I. J. Young. In Anderson's brigade, commanded at Malvern Hill by Colonel Tew, were the Second, Colonel Tew; the Fourteenth, Colonel Johnston; the Thirtieth, Colonel Parker. In Ripley's were the First and Third North Carolina, the First under Lieut.-Col. W. P. Bynum, of the Second, and the Third under Colonel Meares. As Hill's men moved in, Magruder also ordered an advance of his troops, but they were delayed and did not get into close action until Hill's div
C. C. Tew (search for this): chapter 6
Fifth were absent on detail duty. In Garland's brigade were the Twelfth, Colonel Wade; the Thirteenth, Colonel Scales; the Twentieth, Maj. W. H. Toon; the Twenty-third, Lieut. I. J. Young. In Anderson's brigade, commanded at Malvern Hill by Colonel Tew, were the Second, Colonel Tew; the Fourteenth, Colonel Johnston; the Thirtieth, Colonel Parker. In Ripley's were the First and Third North Carolina, the First under Lieut.-Col. W. P. Bynum, of the Second, and the Third under Colonel Meares. Colonel Tew; the Fourteenth, Colonel Johnston; the Thirtieth, Colonel Parker. In Ripley's were the First and Third North Carolina, the First under Lieut.-Col. W. P. Bynum, of the Second, and the Third under Colonel Meares. As Hill's men moved in, Magruder also ordered an advance of his troops, but they were delayed and did not get into close action until Hill's division had been hurled back. The Comte de Paris, who was on General McClellan's staff and had excellent opportunities for seeing all that was going on, gives this account of the charge of Hill's Carolinians, Georgians and Alabamians: Hill advanced alone against the Federal position. . .. He had therefore before him Morell's right, Couch's division,
n a naturally strong position on the east bank of Powhite creek, six miles from Beaver Dam. Crowning every available prominence with batteries to sweep the roads, and also posting batteries or sections of batteries between his brigades, he, with Sykes' division of regulars, Morell's and McCall's divisions, and later with Slocum's division sent to reinforce him, awaited the attack of the divisions of Jackson, A. P. Hill, Longstreet, Whiting and D. H. Hill. The battle that followed the meeting n all), and nearly a whole regiment of the enemy.. . Lieutenant-Colonel Avery was wounded, the command devolving upon Maj. R. F. Webb, who ably sustained his part. Meanwhile, on Porter's right stubborn work was doing. There Porter had placed Sykes' regulars, the flower of his corps, and they were commanded by a persistent fighter. D. H. Hill, on the extreme Confederate left, and General Jackson, between him and A. P. Hill, moved their divisions against these lines. In Jackson's division,
F. J. Faison (search for this): chapter 6
is advantage on that day's field. On the Confederate side there was also much confusion. The army was too much paralyzed to make any effective pursuit of the Federals, and, after a few days of rest, withdrew to the lines around Richmond. As already seen, the North Carolina losses in these seven days were: killed, 650; wounded, 3,279. Conspicuous among the slain were the following field officers: Cols. M. S. Stokes, Gaston Meares, R. P. Campbell, C. C. Lee; Lieut.-Cols. Petway and F. J. Faison; Majs. T. N. Crumpler, T. L. Skinner, B. R. Huske. These were among the State's most gifted and gallant sons. The losses among the company officers were also heavy. During the progress of this great campaign, there was little fighting in North Carolina, for most of her troops were in Virginia, and the Federals around New Bern did not show much further activity. Some skirmishing occurred around Gatesville, Trenton, Young's crossroads, Pollocksville and Clinton. On the 5th of June, t
d Couch's right . . . and afterward throwing themselves upon the left of Couch's division. But here, also, after nearly reaching the Federal position, they are repulsed. The conflict is carried on with great fierceness on both sides, and for a moment it seems as if the Confederates are at last to penetrate the very center of their adversaries and of the formidable artillery, which was but now dealing destruction in their ranks. But Sumner, who commands on the right, detaches Sickles' and Meagher's brigades successively to Couch's assistance. During this time, Whiting on the left and Huger on the right suffer Hill's soldiers to become exhausted without supporting them. .... At 7 o'clock, Hill reorganized the debris of his troops in the woods . . . his tenacity and the courage of his soldiers have only had the effect of causing him to sustain heavy loss. General Webb says of the same advance: Garland in front (with a North Carolina brigade) attacked the hill with impetuous c
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