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Brownsville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ry, supported by two fragments of regiments of Mahone's brigade, under Colonel Parham. Colonel Munford reports that the two infantry regiments numbered scarcely 300. This small band made a most determined stand for three hours, for it had been directed to hold the gap at all hazards, and did not know that it was fighting Franklin's corps. The action began about noon. Gen. Howell Cobb with his brigade, consisting of the Fifteenth North Carolina regiment and three Georgia regiments, left Brownsville, two miles from the gap, about 5 o'clock, to reinforce Munford. On their arrival they went promptly at their enemies. Weight of numbers soon broke their thin line, and left the gap to Franklin. Manly's battery was engaged here all day, and General Semmes reports that it did good service in breaking the enemy's line by its deliberate and well-directed fire. Cobb's total force, as stated by him, Official Report. did not exceed 2,200, while Franklin's, as given by him, Battles and
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ghtly felt that seasoned as his men were by active service, and filled with enthusiasm and confidence as they were by their successes, he could rely on them for much self-denial and arduous campaigning. Moreover, the prospect of shifting the burden of military occupation from Confederate to Federal soil, and of keeping the Federals out of Southern territory, at least until winter prohibited their re-entering, was alluring. Accordingly, he ordered the divisions of D. H. Hill and McLaws and Hampton's cavalry, which had been left to protect Richmond, to join him. These forces reported to the commander-in-chief near Chantilly on the 2d of September. Between the 4th and the 7th, the entire Confederate army crossed the Potomac at the fords near Leesburg, and encamped in the vicinity of Frederick City. Of this army, thirty regiments of infantry, one battalion of infantry, one cavalry regiment, and four batteries were from North Carolina. These were distributed as follows: The Fifteen
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
lry regiment, and four batteries were from North Carolina. These were distributed as follows: The FAs this important order was addressed to a North Carolina general, D. H. Hill, it should be stated hD. H. Hill's division were so far the only North Carolina troops engaged. Hood is now sent for, andchardson. To his left, the Twentysev-enth North Carolina and Third Alabama of Walker's brigade were of the field, Gen. George B. Anderson, of North Carolina, received a wound that proved mortal. It ion of D. R. Jones, in which there were no North Carolina troops. Jones' men stood manfully to theihe right. In his brigades were two purely North Carolina ones, Branch's and Pender's. General Longsis brilliant close to a hard day's battle, North Carolina lost a gifted son in the death of General his brigade, Brig.-Gen. L. O'B. Branch, of North Carolina. He was my senior brigadier, and one to whow a total loss of only 363. The total North Carolina losses in the invasion of Maryland so far
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
late to aid Miles, they were to turn toward Sharpsburg to prevent the retreat of Longstreet and D. s, remained on their line till withdrawn for Sharpsburg. On the left, Rodes' gallant brigade of 1,2ed to withdraw his troops and concentrate on Sharpsburg. Maj. J. W. Ratchford, of General Hill's st the orders in a whisper. The retirement to Sharpsburg was made in good order and covered by the carrender of Harper's Ferry, and then to reach Sharpsburg early enough to participate in that great bander. By a severe night march, they reached Sharpsburg about noon on the 16th. General Walker says:hrough the long hours of the night's march. Sharpsburg, Battles and Leaders, II, 675. A. P. Hill anm river, and just in front of the village of Sharpsburg. General Jackson was assigned to the extremey-depleted ranks that Lee faced McClellan at Sharpsburg. The Federals, on the other hand, had movede and accurate service at Crampton's gap. At Sharpsburg, Major Frobel, chief of artillery, highly ap
Swan Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
destruction. Just as General Pender prepared to move his infantry forward in assault, a white flag was displayed, and General White, the commanding officer, surrendered 11,000 men, 73 pieces of artillery, 13,000 small-arms, and other stores. Jackson's Report. After a brief rest, Jackson and Walker started to join their commander. By a severe night march, they reached Sharpsburg about noon on the 16th. General Walker says: The thought of General Lee's perilous situation, with the Potomac river on his rear, confronting with his small force McClellan's vast army, had haunted me through the long hours of the night's march. Sharpsburg, Battles and Leaders, II, 675. A. P. Hill and McLaws followed Jackson, arriving during the battle when they were sorely needed. When Jackson and Walker reported for position, General Lee's ground had been selected, and he had placed Longstreet on his right and D. H. Hill to Longstreet's left. The line of battle extended along a slight crest, paral
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
of Longstreet's corps, arrived after an exhausting march of fourteen miles from Hagerstown. These brigades were sent to Ripley's left, and took position in front of Cox. In some way, Ripley's brigade got out of line and marched backward and forwarRipley's brigade got out of line and marched backward and forward without finding its position, and did not fire a gun all day. General Hill now ordered his men forward. He had already found from an early morning observation that General McClellan's large army was advancing on the pass, and while such an advancr [regiment], succeeded in breaking it. Colonel Thruston, of the Third North Carolina, gives this picture of the part of Ripley's brigade in the action on the left: The house being passed, the Third North Carolina infantry mounted over the fencenter was held by D. H. Hill. Three of his brigades had been used since early morning in the battle on the left; of these, Ripley's, the first to be engaged, had retired with Walker; Garland's had been badly broken; Colquitt's, after the fall of most
Crenshaw (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
o join him, and by magic spell had them on the field to meet the final crisis. Thomas' brigade was left behind to finish at Harper's Ferry, so Hill had only five. He ordered two of them, guided by Captain Latrobe, to guard against approach of other forces that might come against him by bridge No. 4, Pender's and Brockenbrough's, and threw Branch's, Gregg's and Archer's against the forefront of the battle, while Toombs', Kemper's and Garnett's engaged against its right. . . . Pegram's and Crenshaw's batteries were put in with A. P. Hill's three brigades. The Washington artillery, S. D. Lee's and Frobel's, found places for part of their batteries, ammunition replenished. D. H. Hill found opportunity to put in parts of his artillery under Elliott, Boyce, Carter and Maurin. Toombs' absent regiments returned as he made his way around to the enemy's right, and joined the right of Gen. D. R. Jones. The strong battle concentrating against General Burnside seemed to spring from the eart
ird North Carolina regiments. The artillery, under Col. S. D. Lee and Major Frobel, watched for its opportunity, moved for every commanding position, and was most handsomely served. During this time men had fallen as leaves fall. So thick were men lying that General Hood found difficulty in keeping his horse from stepping on wounded men. On the Federal side, General Mansfield was killed; Generals Hooker, Hartsuff, Crawford and many subordinates were wounded. On the Confederate side, General Starke and Colonel Douglass, commanding Lawton's brigade, had been killed; Generals Lawton, D. R. Jones and Ripley wounded. A third of the men of Lawton's, Hays' and Trimble's brigades were reported killed or wounded. Of Colquitt's field officers, 4 were killed, 5 wounded, and the remaining one struck slightly. All of Jackson's and D. H. Hill's troops engaged suffered proportionately. Manassas to Appomattox, p. 243. As Mansfield's men of the Twelfth corps deployed, Hooker's corps, wor
J. W. Ratchford (search for this): chapter 8
ourteous, just and upright, he had completely won the affection of his Carolina brigade, which followed him with the utmost loyalty and confidence. That night General Lee determined to withdraw his troops and concentrate on Sharpsburg. Maj. J. W. Ratchford, of General Hill's staff, one of the bravest of the brave, was sent in company with staff officers from General Longstreet's and General Hood's commands to give the requisite orders. So close were the contending lines, that Major RatchforMajor Ratchford says that in some places they had to approach the lines on hands and knees and give the orders in a whisper. The retirement to Sharpsburg was made in good order and covered by the cavalry, which during the Maryland campaign was kept busy. The day before the battles just described, the First North Carolina cavalry, Col. L. S. Baker, had taken part in a sharp artillery and cavalry fight at Middletown. Colonel Baker's regiment held the rear, and, General Stuart says, acted with conspicuous ga
L. O'B. Branch (search for this): chapter 8
the First battalion were in Ewell's division; Branch with five regiments, and Pender with four, were was that night crowned with artillery. Generals Branch and Gregg marched along the river and occ brigades were two purely North Carolina ones, Branch's and Pender's. General Longstreet, to whose ccIntosh's guns, and drove them back pellmell. Branch and Gregg with their old veterans sternly heldPender's brigade was not actively engaged. In Branch's, General Lane says that the Twenty-eighth waCarolina lost a gifted son in the death of General Branch. His commander, Gen. A. P. Hill, said of s battle at the head of his brigade, Brig.-Gen. L. O'B. Branch, of North Carolina. He was my senioble and gallant soldier, Gen. Lawrence O'Brian Branch. General Lee lost about one-third of his arer, Gregg and Thomas, in his front line, Lane (Branch's brigade), Archer and Brockenbrough in his seicers, were killed or mortally wounded: Gen. L. O'B. Branch, Gen. G. B. Anderson, Col. C. C. Tew, a[3 more...]
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