hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 528 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 262 18 Browse Search
Longstreet 173 27 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 171 11 Browse Search
R. F. Hoke 170 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 150 0 Browse Search
William Dorsey Pender 145 3 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 143 1 Browse Search
James H. Lane 136 6 Browse Search
L. O'B. Branch 116 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 810 total hits in 195 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Basil C. Manly (search for this): chapter 8
ent and three Georgia regiments, left Brownsville, two miles from the gap, about 5 o'clock, to reinforce Munford. On their arrival they went promptly at their enemies. Weight of numbers soon broke their thin line, and left the gap to Franklin. Manly's battery was engaged here all day, and General Semmes reports that it did good service in breaking the enemy's line by its deliberate and well-directed fire. Cobb's total force, as stated by him, Official Report. did not exceed 2,200, while eventh and Thirty-seventh were the regiments principally engaged. They fought well, and assisted in driving back three separate and distinct columns of the enemy. The artillery came in for a full share of fighting in this campaign. Latham's, Manly's, and Reilly's batteries did hard service. Manly's was especially commended for active and accurate service at Crampton's gap. At Sharpsburg, Major Frobel, chief of artillery, highly applauds Reilly's conduct of his guns. He reports: I cannot
Charlotte Randolph Meade (search for this): chapter 8
roken. The other brigades held their own, with Hood's assistance, and while there were frequent advances and retreats, remained on their line till withdrawn for Sharpsburg. On the left, Rodes' gallant brigade of 1,200, attacked by the whole of Meade's division of Hooker's corps, made one of the most memorable stands of the war. Although fairly enveloped, he reformed and fought repeatedly, his men perfectly controlled, until at dusk Evans brought him relief enough to save him from destruction. Hatch's division advanced in beautiful order between Meade and Gibbon. As these brigades moved forward at first, there was not a Confederate soldier to oppose them. The brigades of Kemper and of Garnett from Longstreet arrived, jaded and worn, but just in time to form in the face of Hatch. These two brigades, together not numbering over 800 men, Battles and Leaders, II, 575. fought Hatch's men, numbering 3,500 men, Hatch's Report. and held their own until both sides, exhausted, fell
ly, he ordered the divisions of D. H. Hill and McLaws and Hampton's cavalry, which had been left to uted as follows: The Fifteenth regiment was in McLaws' division; Ransom's brigade of four regiments Halleck prevented it. So, General Jackson, General McLaws and General Walker were sent to invest theduty was first to cut off, destroy, or capture McLaws' command, and relieve Colonel Miles at Harper'll, and then to join Franklin against Jackson, McLaws, and Walker. So unexpected was the movement1 killed, 48 wounded, 124 captured or missing. McLaws ordered his brigades all up that night and sethis beautiful place, the divisions of Jackson, McLaws and Walker had co-operated. McLaws, on the no, Battles and Leaders, II, 675. A. P. Hill and McLaws followed Jackson, arriving during the battle wuth, through which the divisions of Walker and McLaws were hurrying to our assistance. Garland'st Walker, as seen above, was just arriving and McLaws was supporting him, and Early made splendid us[5 more...]
W. L. DeRosset (search for this): chapter 8
line of battle was 500 yards further to the left than it was in the early morning, and brought us in close connection with the troops of the right, and in the deadly embrace of the enemy. I use the word embrace in its fullest meaning. Here Colonel DeRosset fell, severely wounded and permanently disabled, Captain Thruston taking command at once. It was now about 7:30 a. m. Jackson's troops were in the woods around, and west of the Dunker church and north of the Sharpsburg-Hagerstown turnpike. Branch, Gen. G. B. Anderson, Col. C. C. Tew, and Capts. W. T. Marsh and D. P. Latham, commanding Fourth North Carolina. The following field officers, or acting field officers, were wounded: Cols. Van H. Manning, R. T. Bennett, F. M. Parker, W. L. DeRosset; Lieut.-Cols. Sanders, W. A. Johnston, Thomas Ruffin (three times); Majs. R. F. Webb and S. D. Thruston; Captains (commanding regiments) S. McD. Tate and E. A. Osborne. In October, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart made a daring cavalry expedition in
Robert Ransom (search for this): chapter 8
rotect Richmond, to join him. These forces reported to the commander-in-chief near Chantilly on the 2d of September. Between the 4th and the 7th, the entire Confederate army crossed the Potomac at the fords near Leesburg, and encamped in the vicinity of Frederick City. Of this army, thirty regiments of infantry, one battalion of infantry, one cavalry regiment, and four batteries were from North Carolina. These were distributed as follows: The Fifteenth regiment was in McLaws' division; Ransom's brigade of four regiments was under Walker, as also were the Twenty-seventh, Forty-sixth and Forty-eighth; the Sixth was with Hood; the Twenty-first and the First battalion were in Ewell's division; Branch with five regiments, and Pender with four, were under A. P. Hill; Garland with five, Anderson with four, and Ripley with two regiments were in D. H. Hill's division. The cavalry was under Stuart, and the batteries were scattered. It had been supposed that as the Confederates advanced
D. K. McRae (search for this): chapter 8
y Colonel Ruffin not to expose himself so needlessly, was killed. Upon the fall of Garland, Colonel McRae assumed command, and ordered the two regiments on the left to close in to the right. This ohe Federals, General Reno, commanding a corps, was killed by the Twenty-third North Carolina. McRae's Report. General Hatch was wounded, as were also Colonels Gallagher and Wainwright, both commanades of Colquitt and Garland, of D. H. Hill's division. Garland's brigade was commanded by Col. D. K. McRae, and included the Fifth, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-third North Carolina reg divisions of Walker and McLaws were hurrying to our assistance. Garland's brigade under Colonel McRae went into action with alacrity, but owing to an unfortunate blunder of one of the captains, ts, was kept intact, and moved to the sunken road. Portions of this brigade were rallied by Colonel McRae and Captain Garnett and others, and again joined in the battle. A little before ten, Gene
R. C. Hill (search for this): chapter 8
regiments, composed of North Carolinians. His own brigade, under Manning and then under Col. E. D. Hall, of the Forty-sixth North Carolina, included the Twenty-seventh, Col. J. R. Cooke; the Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, and the Forty-eighth, Col. R. C. Hill, North Carolina regiments; and Ransom's brigade comprised the Twenty-fourth, Col. J. L. Harris; the Twenty-fifth, Col. H. M. Rutledge; the Thirty-fifth, Col. M. W. Ransom, and the Forty-ninth, Lieut.-Col. L. M. McAfee, North Carolina regiments. As General Walker went in, he was notified that there was a gap of a third of a mile to the left of General Hill, and he detached the Twenty-seventh North Carolina and the Third Arkansas, under Col. J. R. Cooke, of the Carolina regiment, to fill this gap, and well did they carry out their instructions. General McLaws' division from Harper's Ferry entered coincidently with Walker at 10:30. Walker, in Battles and Leaders, II, p. 678. The second stage of the battle has now been reache
nchester & Harper's Ferry railroad. On nearing the town, General Pender, in command of his own, Archer's and Brockenbrough's brigades, was sent to seize a crest overlooking the town, which was done w come against him by bridge No. 4, Pender's and Brockenbrough's, and threw Branch's, Gregg's and Archer's against the forefront of the battle, while Toombs', Kemper's and Garnett's engaged against its Appomattox, pp. 261, 262. Gen. A. P. Hill reports of his brigades: With a yell of defiance, Archer charged them, retook McIntosh's guns, and drove them back pellmell. Branch and Gregg with theiranced with the brigades of Pender, Gregg and Thomas, in his front line, Lane (Branch's brigade), Archer and Brockenbrough in his second. The advance of these brigades was made in the face of a tremenrushed away. Pender met a sharp infantry fire. His Carolinians were not retarded, however, and Archer's brigade and Lane, with his North Carolinians, supporting them, the small force in front was so
about it . . . . . and General Stuart, who was with me on the heights and had just come in from above, told me that he did not believe there was more than a brigade of the enemy. This brigade turned out to be Slocum's division of Franklin's corps, and Smith's division of the same corps was soon added. The gap at that time was held only by Colonel Munford with two regiments of cavalry, Chew's battery, and a section of the Portsmouth naval battery, supported by two fragments of regiments of Mahone's brigade, under Colonel Parham. Colonel Munford reports that the two infantry regiments numbered scarcely 300. This small band made a most determined stand for three hours, for it had been directed to hold the gap at all hazards, and did not know that it was fighting Franklin's corps. The action began about noon. Gen. Howell Cobb with his brigade, consisting of the Fifteenth North Carolina regiment and three Georgia regiments, left Brownsville, two miles from the gap, about 5 o'clock, to
Cadmus Wilcox (search for this): chapter 8
n broke their thin line, and left the gap to Franklin. Manly's battery was engaged here all day, and General Semmes reports that it did good service in breaking the enemy's line by its deliberate and well-directed fire. Cobb's total force, as stated by him, Official Report. did not exceed 2,200, while Franklin's, as given by him, Battles and Leaders, II, 595. hardly exceeded 6,500. However, the last field returns gave Franklin a force greatly in excess of those figures. Semmes' and Wilcox's brigades, that had been ordered up, did not reach the ground until during the night. Cobb's brigade loss was 690. The Fifteenth North Carolina lost 11 killed, 48 wounded, 124 captured or missing. McLaws ordered his brigades all up that night and set them in battle order, but Franklin did not press him the next morning. While this action was going on, a conflict in which much larger forces were engaged was in progress at Turner's gap of South mountain. This action lasted from early mo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...