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S. D. Thruston (search for this): chapter 8
stone fence, and, says General Early, concentrating their fire upon a part of the enemy's line in front of the latter [regiment], succeeded in breaking it. Colonel Thruston, of the Third North Carolina, gives this picture of the part of Ripley's brigade in the action on the left: The house being passed, the Third North Carold in the deadly embrace of the enemy. I use the word embrace in its fullest meaning. Here Colonel DeRosset fell, severely wounded and permanently disabled, Captain Thruston taking command at once. It was now about 7:30 a. m. Jackson's troops were in the woods around, and west of the Dunker church and north of the Sharpsburg-Hagd: Cols. Van H. Manning, R. T. Bennett, F. M. Parker, W. L. DeRosset; Lieut.-Cols. Sanders, W. A. Johnston, Thomas Ruffin (three times); Majs. R. F. Webb and S. D. Thruston; Captains (commanding regiments) S. McD. Tate and E. A. Osborne. In October, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart made a daring cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania. In
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 8
soldiers; they struck long and hard, The losses in these two divisions in their attack on the center were 2,915. and in vastly superior force. So immovably, however, did the battle-tried North Carolinians and Alabamians, aided later by R. H. Anderson's division, Rebellion Records, Vol. XIX, p. 191, et seq. die in piles on the sunken road in which they fought, that they have made it immortal as Bloody Lane. Colonel Allan says: After a most gallant resistance, Hill was driven from the Bloody Lane. Anderson was involved in the defeat, and it looked as if the enemy was about to pierce the Confederate center. The noble efforts of many brave men prevented this result. The artillery was managed and served with a skill never surpassed. Fragments of commands fought with a splendid determination. As General Longstreet says, the brave Col. J. R. Cooke (Twenty-seventh North Carolina) showed front to the enemy when he no longer had a cartridge. Such instances of gallantry as
t. To relieve Harper's Ferry and to strike the divided Confederates, it became necessary for McClellan to pass through the gaps of South mountain, for the direct turnpike by Knoxville was not suited to military purposes. He accordingly put his army in motion to cut the enemy in two and beat him in detail. Order to Franklin, September 13th. Franklin and Couch were to move through Crampton's gap, and their duty was first to cut off, destroy, or capture McLaws' command, and relieve Colonel Miles at Harper's Ferry; if too late to aid Miles, they were to turn toward Sharpsburg to prevent the retreat of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, who were to be attacked by the main body. All the rest of McClellan's army set out, by way of Turner's gap and Fox's gap, for Boonsboro. This main part of the army was intended to crush Longstreet and D. H. Hill, and then to join Franklin against Jackson, McLaws, and Walker. So unexpected was the movement, and so successfully did the Federals mask the
ad been without food for three days, except a half ration of beef for one day, and green corn, to cook. The brigades of Trimble and Law, of Jackson's corps, took Hood's place on the line, Trimble connecting with Hill. During the night the FederalsTrimble connecting with Hill. During the night the Federals were not idle. General Mansfield, with the Twelfth corps, crossed and moved up behind Hooker. This made five Federal divisions ready to fall on the Confederate left in the morning. Before daylight on the 17th, the reverberation of cannon along's brigade, had been killed; Generals Lawton, D. R. Jones and Ripley wounded. A third of the men of Lawton's, Hays' and Trimble's brigades were reported killed or wounded. Of Colquitt's field officers, 4 were killed, 5 wounded, and the remaining o Miller, who was killed during the battle, along with the Twenty-first Georgia, was posted by Colonel Walker, commanding Trimble's brigade, behind a stone fence, and, says General Early, concentrating their fire upon a part of the enemy's line in fr
Mansfield (search for this): chapter 8
mble connecting with Hill. During the night the Federals were not idle. General Mansfield, with the Twelfth corps, crossed and moved up behind Hooker. This made fwas simply frightful, and yet it was only beginning. Between 6 and 7 o'clock Mansfield pressed forward to support Hooker. The Twenty-first North Carolina and the Fy in keeping his horse from stepping on wounded men. On the Federal side, General Mansfield was killed; Generals Hooker, Hartsuff, Crawford and many subordinates wereld in check the six There were only five present. divisions of Hooker and Mansfield; so tenaciously did their brave troops cling to the earth, that when reinforc The second stage of the battle has now been reached. Hooker has retired and Mansfield has been brought to a stand. Jackson, worn and exhausted, has retired. Hoodthe left which I took to belong to Mansfield's command. In the meantime, General Mansfield had been killed, and a portion of his corps (formerly Banks') had also be
James Reilly (search for this): chapter 8
nct columns of the enemy. The artillery came in for a full share of fighting in this campaign. Latham's, Manly's, and Reilly's batteries did hard service. Manly's was especially commended for active and accurate service at Crampton's gap. At Sharpsburg, Major Frobel, chief of artillery, highly applauds Reilly's conduct of his guns. He reports: I cannot too highly applaud the conduct of both officers and men. Captains Bachman and Reilly fought their batteries with their usual determinationReilly fought their batteries with their usual determination and devotion to the cause. Captain Reilly's first lieutenant, J. A. Ramsey, who that day fought his section for a time under the direct personal orders of General Lee, is also commended for gallant conduct. In this brilliant close to a hard day'Captain Reilly's first lieutenant, J. A. Ramsey, who that day fought his section for a time under the direct personal orders of General Lee, is also commended for gallant conduct. In this brilliant close to a hard day's battle, North Carolina lost a gifted son in the death of General Branch. His commander, Gen. A. P. Hill, said of him: The Confederacy has to mourn the loss of a gallant soldier and accomplished gentleman, who fell in this battle at the head of his
to recover the ground lost by Garland, but failed. Shortly after, Rodes' brigade reached the field and was ordered to a commanding positionalry, formed on the Confederate left to attack the position held by Rodes. Gibbon, of this corps, advanced on the National turnpike against er 9,000 men on the field, and at the time of the opening attack on Rodes' position, Hill's division of less than 5,000 men had been reinforcremained on their line till withdrawn for Sharpsburg. On the left, Rodes' gallant brigade of 1,200, attacked by the whole of Meade's divisioork on the line. So Hill was left with only the Alabama brigade of Rodes and the North Carolina brigade of G. B. Anderson to stand against tas not entirely the result of their fighting, good as that was. General Rodes, whose men were in most excellent positions, having profited bytold the next regiment that the order was intended also for it. General Rodes was, at the time the movement began, aiding a wounded comrade,
W. H. H. Cowles (search for this): chapter 8
38. This official list, however, does not include the casualties in the Fifth, Twelfth and Fourteenth regiments. The following field officers, or acting field officers, were killed or mortally wounded: Gen. L. O'B. Branch, Gen. G. B. Anderson, Col. C. C. Tew, and Capts. W. T. Marsh and D. P. Latham, commanding Fourth North Carolina. The following field officers, or acting field officers, were wounded: Cols. Van H. Manning, R. T. Bennett, F. M. Parker, W. L. DeRosset; Lieut.-Cols. Sanders, W. A. Johnston, Thomas Ruffin (three times); Majs. R. F. Webb and S. D. Thruston; Captains (commanding regiments) S. McD. Tate and E. A. Osborne. In October, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart made a daring cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania. In this expedition the First North Carolina cavalry, Lieut.-Col. J. B. Gordon, took part. General Hampton in his official report commends the regiment, and especially the squadron commanded by Capt. W. H. H. Cowles, which had some special duties assigned to it.
to support Hooker. The Twenty-first North Carolina and the First battalion, of Ewell's division, and the First and Third regiments of D. H. Hill's division were so far the only North Carolina troops engaged. Hood is now sent for, and the Sixth regiment, Major Webb, enters with him. G. T. Anderson enters to brace the Confederate left. Doubleday's attack was driven back, Gibbon and Phelps suffering terribly; the Confederates, however, were repulsed in an effort to follow their advantage. Hofmann and Ricketts, and subsequently Mansfield's brigades, moved further toward the Confederate center, and this brought into action the brigades of Colquitt and Garland, of D. H. Hill's division. Garland's brigade was commanded by Col. D. K. McRae, and included the Fifth, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-third North Carolina regiments. The artillery, under Col. S. D. Lee and Major Frobel, watched for its opportunity, moved for every commanding position, and was most handsomely served.
M. W. Ransom (search for this): chapter 8
at just behind Hood. Walker's division, consisting of Walker's own brigade and Ransom's brigade, was, with the exception of two regiments, composed of North Carolinionel Hall, and the Forty-eighth, Col. R. C. Hill, North Carolina regiments; and Ransom's brigade comprised the Twenty-fourth, Col. J. L. Harris; the Twenty-fifth, Col and Col. E. D. Hall succeeded to the command of the brigade. To the left, General Ransom's brigade of Carolinians drove the enemy from the woods in its front, and t key of the battlefield, in defiance of several sharp, later infantry attacks. Ransom's men endured a prolonged fire from the enemy's batteries on the extreme edge o and explosions, realizing to the fullest the fearful sublimity of battle. Colonel Ransom, of the Thirty-fifth regiment, left in command of the brigade by the temporary absence on official duty of General Ransom, withstood a serious attack and led his command in a hot pursuit. The Twenty-seventh North Carolina and Third Arkansas
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