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Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
s, that General Stuart's cavalrymen, ever untiring and daring, had not found out up to the time of attack on these gaps that McClellan's whole army was before them. When the cannon opened at Crampton's gap, General McLaws, who heard it from Maryland heights, attached no special significance to it. He says in his official report, I felt no particular concern about it . . . . . and General Stuart, who was with me on the heights and had just come in from above, told me that he did not believe thererry, and then to reach Sharpsburg early enough to participate in that great battle. During the investment of this beautiful place, the divisions of Jackson, McLaws and Walker had co-operated. McLaws, on the north bank of the river, seized Maryland heights and placed his artillery in position where it did execution. General Walker approached on the Hillsboro road. At the foot of Loudon heights, he sent Colonel Cooke with the Twenty-seventh North Carolina to occupy the heights. Batteries wer
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
March to Frederick City the lost order Mountain battles Crampton's gap Boonsboro vigorous skirmishing the surrender of Harper's Ferry by the Federals battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam First North Carolina cavalry with J. E. B. Stuart in Pennsylvania. Immediately after the Rappahannock campaign, General Lee, desiring if possible to inflict futher injury upon the enemy before the season for active operations passed, and believing that the best way to relieve Virginia was to threaten the Lieut.-Cols. Sanders, W. A. Johnston, Thomas Ruffin (three times); Majs. R. F. Webb and S. D. Thruston; Captains (commanding regiments) S. McD. Tate and E. A. Osborne. In October, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart made a daring cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania. In this expedition the First North Carolina cavalry, Lieut.-Col. J. B. Gordon, took part. General Hampton in his official report commends the regiment, and especially the squadron commanded by Capt. W. H. H. Cowles, which had some special d
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ed 11,000 men, 73 pieces of artillery, 13,000 small-arms, and other stores. Jackson's Report. After a brief rest, Jackson and Walker started to join their comp assault on Hood's brigades, which had been moved to D. H. Hill's left before Jackson's arrival, bivouacked on that side of the river. The Sixth North Carolina waseef for one day, and green corn, to cook. The brigades of Trimble and Law, of Jackson's corps, took Hood's place on the line, Trimble connecting with Hill. During three divisions against the Confederate left flank. The attack fell first on Jackson, and Ripley, of D. H. Hill's left, went to his aid, and fierce and bloody was cers, 4 were killed, 5 wounded, and the remaining one struck slightly. All of Jackson's and D. H. Hill's troops engaged suffered proportionately. Manassas to Appisabled, Captain Thruston taking command at once. It was now about 7:30 a. m. Jackson's troops were in the woods around, and west of the Dunker church and north of
Pond Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
tain gaps saved Lee, for this check to the movement of the Federals gave Jackson and his comrades time to receive the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and then to reach Sharpsburg early enough to participate in that great battle. During the investment of this beautiful place, the divisions of Jackson, McLaws and Walker had co-operated. McLaws, on the north bank of the river, seized Maryland heights and placed his artillery in position where it did execution. General Walker approached on the Hillsboro road. At the foot of Loudon heights, he sent Colonel Cooke with the Twenty-seventh North Carolina to occupy the heights. Batteries were then established, and on the 14th engaged in an artillery duel with the enemy, in which Maj. F. L. Wiatt, of the Forty-eighth North Carolina, was wounded, and one or two privates were also struck. General Jackson moved by way of the Winchester & Harper's Ferry railroad. On nearing the town, General Pender, in command of his own, Archer's and Brockenbr
Chantilly (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
cesses, he could rely on them for much self-denial and arduous campaigning. Moreover, the prospect of shifting the burden of military occupation from Confederate to Federal soil, and of keeping the Federals out of Southern territory, at least until winter prohibited their re-entering, was alluring. Accordingly, he ordered the divisions of D. H. Hill and McLaws and Hampton's cavalry, which had been left to protect Richmond, to join him. These forces reported to the commander-in-chief near Chantilly on the 2d of September. Between the 4th and the 7th, the entire Confederate army crossed the Potomac at the fords near Leesburg, and encamped in the vicinity of Frederick City. Of this army, thirty regiments of infantry, one battalion of infantry, one cavalry regiment, and four batteries were from North Carolina. These were distributed as follows: The Fifteenth regiment was in McLaws' division; Ransom's brigade of four regiments was under Walker, as also were the Twenty-seventh, Fort
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 7: Lee's Maryland campaign the March to Frederick City the lost order Mountain battles Crampton's gap Boonsboro vigorous skirmishing the surrender of Harper's Ferry by the Federals battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam First North Carolina cavalry with J. E. B. Stuart in Pennsylvania. Immediately after thral Walker were sent to invest these places, and the rest of the army—Longstreet's and D. H. Hill's divisions—was ordered to cross South mountain and move toward Boonsboro, where the army was to be concentrated on the fall of Harper's Ferry. Meanwhile, General McClellan, Pope having been relieved of command, was advancing by sloreat of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, who were to be attacked by the main body. All the rest of McClellan's army set out, by way of Turner's gap and Fox's gap, for Boonsboro. This main part of the army was intended to crush Longstreet and D. H. Hill, and then to join Franklin against Jackson, McLaws, and Walker. So unexpected was
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
pulse of Sedgwick's divisions are not more than the facts warrant. They did drive the enemy before them in magnificent style; they did sweep the woods with perfect ease; they did inflict great loss on the enemy; they did drive them not only through the woods, but (some of them, at any rate) over a field in front of the woods, and over two high fences beyond and into another body of woods (i. e., the east woods) over half a mile distant from the commencement of the fight. Antietam and Fredericksburg, p. 91. In this rout of Sedgwick, the North Carolina regiments were destructive participants, Walker's division containing them being, as stated by Cox, the first to start the rout. On the right, Colonel Manning, commanding a brigade, took the Forty-sixth and Forty-eighth North Carolina and Thirteenth Virginia, and dashed forward in gallant style, crossed the open field beyond, driving the enemy before them like sheep until, arriving at a long line of strong post and rail fences
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ete revelation of his adversary's plans and purposes as no other commander, in the history of war, has ever received at a time so momentous. From Manassas to Appomattox. A copy of Lee's celebrated order No. 191, frequently known as the lost dispatch, was found by Private Mitchell, of the Twenty-seventh Indiana regiment, and aters, 4 were killed, 5 wounded, and the remaining one struck slightly. All of Jackson's and D. H. Hill's troops engaged suffered proportionately. Manassas to Appomattox, p. 243. As Mansfield's men of the Twelfth corps deployed, Hooker's corps, worn from its struggle with Jackson, withdrew up the Hagerstown pike. General Lonbattery and the ground that had been lost on the right, before the slow advancing night dropped her mantle upon this field of seldom equaled strife. Manassas to Appomattox, pp. 261, 262. Gen. A. P. Hill reports of his brigades: With a yell of defiance, Archer charged them, retook McIntosh's guns, and drove them back pellmell.
South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
r were sent to invest these places, and the rest of the army—Longstreet's and D. H. Hill's divisions—was ordered to cross South mountain and move toward Boonsboro, where the army was to be concentrated on the fall of Harper's Ferry. Meanwhile, Geieve Harper's Ferry and to strike the divided Confederates, it became necessary for McClellan to pass through the gaps of South mountain, for the direct turnpike by Knoxville was not suited to military purposes. He accordingly put his army in motio While this action was going on, a conflict in which much larger forces were engaged was in progress at Turner's gap of South mountain. This action lasted from early morning until after dark, and, first and last, many troops took part; but until rt reported that his cavalry was followed by two brigades of infantry, and asked D. H. Hill, whose forces were closest to South mountain, to send a brigade to check the Federals at the foot of the mountain. Owing to long field service and poor equi
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
tant did that officer consider the order that he did not trust his adjutant to copy it, but made the copy himself. With like care, General Hill preserved the order then, and preserved it until his death. Who lost the order from General Lee is not known, but it is absolutely certain that General Hill did not lose it. To relieve Harper's Ferry and to strike the divided Confederates, it became necessary for McClellan to pass through the gaps of South mountain, for the direct turnpike by Knoxville was not suited to military purposes. He accordingly put his army in motion to cut the enemy in two and beat him in detail. Order to Franklin, September 13th. Franklin and Couch were to move through Crampton's gap, and their duty was first to cut off, destroy, or capture McLaws' command, and relieve Colonel Miles at Harper's Ferry; if too late to aid Miles, they were to turn toward Sharpsburg to prevent the retreat of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, who were to be attacked by the main body
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