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s army in motion to cut the enemy in two and beat him in detail. Order to Franklin, September 13th. Franklin and Couch were to move through Crampton's gap, and tFranklin and Couch were to move through Crampton's gap, and their duty was first to cut off, destroy, or capture McLaws' command, and relieve Colonel Miles at Harper's Ferry; if too late to aid Miles, they were to turn toward S of the army was intended to crush Longstreet and D. H. Hill, and then to join Franklin against Jackson, McLaws, and Walker. So unexpected was the movement, and soir enemies. Weight of numbers soon broke their thin line, and left the gap to Franklin. Manly's battery was engaged here all day, and General Semmes reports that itLeaders, II, 595. hardly exceeded 6,500. However, the last field returns gave Franklin a force greatly in excess of those figures. Semmes' and Wilcox's brigades, thcLaws ordered his brigades all up that night and set them in battle order, but Franklin did not press him the next morning. While this action was going on, a confl
al Stuart, who was with me on the heights and had just come in from above, told me that he did not believe there was more than a brigade of the enemy. This brigade turned out to be Slocum's division of Franklin's corps, and Smith's division of the same corps was soon added. The gap at that time was held only by Colonel Munford with two regiments of cavalry, Chew's battery, and a section of the Portsmouth naval battery, supported by two fragments of regiments of Mahone's brigade, under Colonel Parham. Colonel Munford reports that the two infantry regiments numbered scarcely 300. This small band made a most determined stand for three hours, for it had been directed to hold the gap at all hazards, and did not know that it was fighting Franklin's corps. The action began about noon. Gen. Howell Cobb with his brigade, consisting of the Fifteenth North Carolina regiment and three Georgia regiments, left Brownsville, two miles from the gap, about 5 o'clock, to reinforce Munford. On thei
D. R. Jones (search for this): chapter 8
l Starke and Colonel Douglass, commanding Lawton's brigade, had been killed; Generals Lawton, D. R. Jones and Ripley wounded. A third of the men of Lawton's, Hays' and Trimble's brigades were reportis was followed by the attack of this corps on the Confederate right, held by the division of D. R. Jones, in which there were no North Carolina troops. Jones' men stood manfully to their lines, butJones' men stood manfully to their lines, but while his left baffled the efforts of Burnside's men, his right was overlapped and broken. At this crisis, A. P. Hill's division, after a hard march of 17 miles, deployed into battle line without as were two purely North Carolina ones, Branch's and Pender's. General Longstreet, to whose corps Jones belonged, thus describes the close of the battle: When General Lee found that General Jack regiments returned as he made his way around to the enemy's right, and joined the right of Gen. D. R. Jones. The strong battle concentrating against General Burnside seemed to spring from the earth
Wainwright (search for this): chapter 8
the pike. This assault was especially directed against Colquitt's two brave regiments behind the stone fence. Gibbon lost 38 of his 1,500 men, but failed to move Colquitt from his advantageous position. During this day of scattered battles, many gallant officers and men on both sides were killed or wounded. Of the Federals, General Reno, commanding a corps, was killed by the Twenty-third North Carolina. McRae's Report. General Hatch was wounded, as were also Colonels Gallagher and Wainwright, both commanding brigades. The death of General Garland was a serious loss to the Confederates. Daring to the point of recklessness, courteous, just and upright, he had completely won the affection of his Carolina brigade, which followed him with the utmost loyalty and confidence. That night General Lee determined to withdraw his troops and concentrate on Sharpsburg. Maj. J. W. Ratchford, of General Hill's staff, one of the bravest of the brave, was sent in company with staff officer
at has since been known as Burnside's bridge across the Antietam, held by two regiments and a part of a regiment from General Toombs' brigade. No more gallant deed was done that day than the defense of this bridge by those devoted Georgia regiments. No. 4, Pender's and Brockenbrough's, and threw Branch's, Gregg's and Archer's against the forefront of the battle, while Toombs', Kemper's and Garnett's engaged against its right. . . . Pegram's and Crenshaw's batteries were put in with A. P. Hill'son replenished. D. H. Hill found opportunity to put in parts of his artillery under Elliott, Boyce, Carter and Maurin. Toombs' absent regiments returned as he made his way around to the enemy's right, and joined the right of Gen. D. R. Jones. The concentrating fires that were crushing, he found it necessary to recover his lines and withdraw. A. P. Hill's brigades, Toombs and Kemper, followed. They recovered McIntosh's battery and the ground that had been lost on the right, before the slow
E. V. Sumner (search for this): chapter 8
ove referred to, came up and stayed the tide for a short time. Now Sumner with his three divisions put in appearance, when our thin lines weronly a small force guards the Confederate left. At this moment General Sumner marched against the Confederates with the Second corps of three divisions. General Sumner, as quoted by Longstreet, thus described the field when he advanced: On going on the field, I found that General Hformerly Banks') had also been thrown into confusion. Sedgwick, of Sumner, was in the lead, and his three brigades moved toward the Dunker chvision diagonally upon the already broker. and retreating lines of Sumner. Taken at such disadvantage, these had never a chance, and in spite of the heroic bravery of Sumner and Sedgwick, with most of their officers (Sedgwick being severely wounded), the division was driven off toappearance of Sedgwick ended the serious fighting on the left. But Sumner's remaining divisions, commanded by French and Richardson, were alr
led well his left against A. P. Hill; but assailed in front and on his flank by concentrating fires that were crushing, he found it necessary to recover his lines and withdraw. A. P. Hill's brigades, Toombs and Kemper, followed. They recovered McIntosh's battery and the ground that had been lost on the right, before the slow advancing night dropped her mantle upon this field of seldom equaled strife. Manassas to Appomattox, pp. 261, 262. Gen. A. P. Hill reports of his brigades: With a yell of defiance, Archer charged them, retook McIntosh's guns, and drove them back pellmell. Branch and Gregg with their old veterans sternly held their ground, and pouring in destructive volleys, the tide of the enemy surged back. Pender's brigade was not actively engaged. In Branch's, General Lane says that the Twenty-eighth was detached, and with the Eighteenth, was not seriously engaged. The Thirty-third, Seventh and Thirty-seventh were the regiments principally engaged. They fought well,
; wounded, 1,838. This official list, however, does not include the casualties in the Fifth, Twelfth and Fourteenth regiments. The following field officers, or acting field officers, were killed or mortally wounded: Gen. L. O'B. Branch, Gen. G. B. Anderson, Col. C. C. Tew, and Capts. W. T. Marsh and D. P. Latham, commanding Fourth North Carolina. The following field officers, or acting field officers, were wounded: Cols. Van H. Manning, R. T. Bennett, F. M. Parker, W. L. DeRosset; Lieut.-Cols. Sanders, W. A. Johnston, Thomas Ruffin (three times); Majs. R. F. Webb and S. D. Thruston; Captains (commanding regiments) S. McD. Tate and E. A. Osborne. In October, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart made a daring cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania. In this expedition the First North Carolina cavalry, Lieut.-Col. J. B. Gordon, took part. General Hampton in his official report commends the regiment, and especially the squadron commanded by Capt. W. H. H. Cowles, which had some special duties assi
two miles from the gap, about 5 o'clock, to reinforce Munford. On their arrival they went promptly at their enemies. Weight of numbers soon broke their thin line, and left the gap to Franklin. Manly's battery was engaged here all day, and General Semmes reports that it did good service in breaking the enemy's line by its deliberate and well-directed fire. Cobb's total force, as stated by him, Official Report. did not exceed 2,200, while Franklin's, as given by him, Battles and Leaders, II, 595. hardly exceeded 6,500. However, the last field returns gave Franklin a force greatly in excess of those figures. Semmes' and Wilcox's brigades, that had been ordered up, did not reach the ground until during the night. Cobb's brigade loss was 690. The Fifteenth North Carolina lost 11 killed, 48 wounded, 124 captured or missing. McLaws ordered his brigades all up that night and set them in battle order, but Franklin did not press him the next morning. While this action was going
McClellan (search for this): chapter 8
he fall of Harper's Ferry. Meanwhile, General McClellan, Pope having been relieved of command, wfice, directed to me, was lost and fell into McClellan's hands. Did the courier lose it? Did Lee'ivided Confederates, it became necessary for McClellan to pass through the gaps of South mountain, attacked by the main body. All the rest of McClellan's army set out, by way of Turner's gap and F up to the time of attack on these gaps that McClellan's whole army was before them. When the cann position hazardous, he was relieved to find McClellan in his front in such force, for the Confederfternoon, the Federals had, according to General McClellan, 30,000 men; according to Battles and Len his rear, confronting with his small force McClellan's vast army, had haunted me through the longIt had not had the rest that a large part of McClellan's army enjoyed while Pope was engaging Lee. s with largely-depleted ranks that Lee faced McClellan at Sharpsburg. The Federals, on the other h[3 more...]
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