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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Stone Church (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
65; guns, 96; Army of the Ohio, Major-general Schofield commanding; infantry, 11,183; artillery, 679; cavalry, 1,697; total 13,559; guns, 28. Grand aggregate, troops 98,797, guns 254. As for the supplies, a very respectable quantity had been accumulated at Chattanooga, and during the entire campaign, says the Federal commander, stores were sent forward in wonderful abundance. Sherman made his forward movement during the first week in May by orders from Grant, skirmishing steadily at Stone church May 1st, Lee's cross-roads the 2d, and daily afterward at various points more or less severely through the entire month, gaining ground only to the south of the Etowah. Johnston was in a rough and partially mountainous country, which, while partly available for defense, also aided his antagonist in movements to the flank. The mountainous region in which the campaign began did not furnish formidable ranges lying across the avenues of attack, with flanks remote from convenient approach.
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of Johnston's army campaign from Dalton to the Chattahoochee Resaca, New Hope church and Kenesaw mountain battles about Atlanta Wheeler's raid Jonesboro and the evacuation. Before the beginnible, along the Brush, Pine and Lost mountains, across the railroad and before Marietta near Kenesaw mountain. Here he held Sherman for a month. At this time the three divisions of Polk's army of Mg the railroad, Johnston's army was formed on a line extending across the railroad north of Kenesaw mountain. Hardee's left was at Gilgal church, Bate's division occupying the summit of Pine mountainreparing a new line (the third before Marietta), the famous one which included the crest of Kenesaw mountain. On the 18th there was heavy skirmishing while the new line was being prepared. On that dMc-Pherson began this movement on the night of July 2d, and next morning Johnston abandoned Kenesaw mountain for a line he had been preparing at Smyrna Station. Thus ended the twenty-six days of fig
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
mmunications; destroy them at various points between Marietta and Chattanooga; then cross the Tennessee river and break the lines of the two railroads running to Nashville; leave 1,200 men to operate on those roads; return and again strike the railroad south of Chattanooga and rejoin the army. This long-desired and long-delayed mg a column of cavalry from Knoxville. General Williams was here detached for a side expedition, and Wheeler kept on with a depleted force. He went on nearly to Nashville and thence south to Alabama, repulsing the attacks of Major-Generals Rousseau, Steedman, and Brigadier-generals Croxton and Granger, near Nashville and at FranklNashville and at Franklin, Lynnville, Campbellville and other points; capturing McMinnville and other depots, burning stores of supplies, destroying bridges and burning trains, and so thoroughly tearing up the Nashville & Decatur railroad that it was never completely repaired by the enemy. His entire loss in the expedition was 150 killed, wounded and mi
Smyrna Station (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the latter; Loring's corps, 236 killed, wounded and missing. The heaviest losses were by the divisions of Cheatham and French. Sherman, having made this failure in a direct attack, at great cost to his army, resumed his flanking tactics, ordering McPherson from the north front of Kenesaw to extend Schofield's line toward the Chattahoochee. Mc-Pherson began this movement on the night of July 2d, and next morning Johnston abandoned Kenesaw mountain for a line he had been preparing at Smyrna Station. Thus ended the twenty-six days of fighting before Marietta, in which the total Confederate loss was 3,948. When Johnston took this last position at Smyrna, across the railroad, Gen. G. W. Smith's division of Georgia militia was ordered to support Jackson's cavalry on the left. Smith brought with him R. W. Anderson's battery of light artillery, and took position in the open country until pushed back to the crest of Nickajack ridge, about three miles north of Turner's ferry. Sherman
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ht, and were crossing the Etowah near Stilesboro. Information from Wheeler and Jackson given Johnston near the pass of Allatoona, satisfied him that Sherman was making a detour toward Dallas, and he promptly took advantage of two strong lines extencapable of defense was on Allatoona creek, the front line on Pumpkin Vine creek, running southwest from the vicinity of Allatoona. The Federal forces crossed the, Etowah at Rome and other points between there and Stilesboro, and, to meet this movmishes, they drove the enemy before them beyond Big Shanty. Sherman, meanwhile, was establishing a secondary base at Allatoona, building a bridge over the Etowah and completing the railroad in order to bring up supplies. On the 8th of June, Gen.orce, said Sherman, about compensated for our losses in battle, and the detachments left at Resaca, Rome, Kingston and Allatoona. On the 9th of June, Sherman, having made his communications to the rear secure and obtained ample supplies, moved f
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
r on the 26th, the scouts brought in word that the Federals were leaving their works, even falling back to the river—had Wheeler caused this? Then Stewart and Lee marched out and occupied the deserted works. Some prisoners were brought in, but none of them would give any information. The only hostile force at hand was in front of a part of Hardee's line. The prevailing impression was that Sherman was falling back across the Chattahoochee. The mournful news arrived of the surrender of Fort Morgan, Mobile harbor. On the 27th still no knowledge of what the enemy was really doing, but the prisoners brought in said that Sherman intended to retreat to Chattanooga. Orders were issued to the cavalry officers to be on the alert and obtain information. G. W. Smith's division was sent to the left flank, where Stevenson was, and the latter was to hold himself in readiness at a moment's notice. General Maney was also ordered to be ready for instant action. At last, on the 28th, came new
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ietta, his right on the railroad; General Thomas on Kenesaw and Pine mountains, and General Schofield off towarerman prepared to attempt to break the line between Kenesaw and Pine mountains, and on the morning of the 14th,ed on the north between the railroad at the foot of Kenesaw and the Canton road, Loring on the mountain, and Haham in order. This was an admirable position, with Kenesaw as a salient from which all the movements of the ener of his troops before the impregnable defenses of Kenesaw. In the plan of battle, McPherson was to attack nee of these attacks, near the southwest extremity of Kenesaw, on the Burnt Hickory road, fell upon Cockrell's Mi assisted by the furious fire from French's guns on Kenesaw, which stopped the enemy before he reached Walker's, and 9 were captured in the battle of June 27th at Kenesaw. Only half of the company present for duty were intactics, ordering McPherson from the north front of Kenesaw to extend Schofield's line toward the Chattahoochee
Intrenchment Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
to select a line of defense immediately about Atlanta, the works already constructed for the place being wholly useless from their position; Stewart's and Cheatham's corps to take position and construct works to defend the city, the former on the left, the latter on the right. The artillery, under the command of Brigadier-General Shoup, was massed on the extreme right (east). Hardee was ordered to move with his corps during the night of the 21st south on the McDonough road, crossing Intrenchment creek at Cobb's mills, and to completely turn the left of McPherson's army. This he was to do, even if it became necessary to go to or beyond Decatur. Wheeler with his cavalry was ordered to move on Hardee's right, both to attack at daylight or as soon thereafter as possible. As soon as Hardee succeeded in forcing back the enemy's left, Cheatham was to take up the movement from his right, and continue to force the whole from right to left down Peachtree creek, Stewart in like manner to en
Youngblood, Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
eynolds and Cantey, attacked with great vigor and persistence, and lost 152 officers and nearly 1,000 men, considerably more than a third of his strength, without gaining any advantage. Quarles' brigade, his reserve, sent in next to Lee, lost 514, including all the regimental commanders but one. Twenty-nine line officers were killed or wounded. Reynolds reported a loss of 167 killed and wounded out of about 400 in action; Gholson's brigade, attached to Reynolds, lost 144 out of 450, and Youngblood's Georgia battalion, from Augusta, lost 9 out of 500. Loring's division, of Stewart's corps, took position along the Lickskillet road and held that line on the left of Lee after Walthall was withdrawn. Here General Loring and General Stewart were both wounded. On the previous day Brigadier-General Ector, while in the works about Atlanta, was so severely wounded by a fragment of shell as to cause the amputation of his left leg. This bloody battle of July 28th, which might have been suc
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of night they were constrained to seek safety in these dungeons beneath the earth. Albeit, I cannot recall one word from their lips expressive of dissatisfaction or willingness to surrender. On the 16th of August, Sherman issued his orders preparatory to the grand movement by the right flank, to begin on the 18th. In the meantime General Wheeler had been ordered to move upon the Federal communications; destroy them at various points between Marietta and Chattanooga; then cross the Tennessee river and break the lines of the two railroads running to Nashville; leave 1,200 men to operate on those roads; return and again strike the railroad south of Chattanooga and rejoin the army. This long-desired and long-delayed movement could not have been intrusted to a better leader. Though his men were much worn and his horses were suffering from scarcity of forage, Wheeler started August 10th with 4,000 troopers, and first tore up the railroad above Marietta, next near Cassville, and t
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