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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
that fell within the fort rolled into the deep furrows that had been made to receive them, where they burst without doing injury. Less than one year had passed since the seizure by the Confederates of all of the forts within their power, and again the National ensign floated over three of them. The blockading duties did not prevent the officers commanding vessels from more pronounced action when circumstances appeared to favor it. Lieutenant-Commanding A. C. Behind, in the Crusader, at North Edisto, had sent a boat's crew to assist a Government agent. In performing this duty Master Urann was severely wounded by the enemy. Colonel Fellows, Fifty-fifth regiment of Pennsylvania, kindly detailed a force under Lieutenant Bedell to accompany Captain Rhind. A force of 60 men with a light field howitzer reached the vicinity of the enemy at 3 A. M. of the 19th of April, but not without discovery and the precipitate flight of the enemy. Shortly after daylight a considerable force of mount
Talbot Island (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
. At 9 A. M. the Isaac Smith arrived, and later in the day the other gunboats that had passed through the Sound. In the afternoon the Mohican came in by the sea entrance with the flag-officer on board. We will now note the earlier movements of the enemy. General Trapier reports that on February 23d he received General R. E. Lee's order to withdraw from the islands, securing the artillery, etc. This order was sent by special messenger to the officer commanding the post at Amelia and Talbot Islands, and to Colonel McBlair, commanding the batteries, to dismantle the batteries with all possible expedition and caution, and then to withdraw the troops and abandon the post. The fourth day after the receipt of this order the enemy made his appearance simultaneously in Cumberland Sound, having entered by St. Andrew's, and off the town of Fernandina. At that time the greater number of the guns had been dismounted and removed, and all of the guns that protected the direct entrance to Fe
Quaker (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rgetown, S. C., on May 21st, accompanied by the Norwich. A redoubt near the lighthouse was found deserted. Within, on South Island, an extensive work was seen, with apparently several large barbette guns. On a nearer approach, they were found to be what are known as Quakers. From this view Cat Island was visible, and on it a well-built fort, with cavalry in the skirts of the woodland, who were scattered by shells. The vessels found these works deserted also and in like manner armed with Quaker guns. The work was quadrangular, fitted with platforms for mounting ten guns, with bomb-proofs, magazines, and furnace for hot shot. The woodwork was collected and set on fire, as also a large quantity of timber intended for obstructing the channel. The following day the vessels passed up the river to Georgetown and steamed slowly along the wharves, the muzzles of the guns within thirty yards of the houses. A brig loaded with turpentine was set on fire to prevent the approach of the ve
South Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ing rapidly. They opened fire, but after a skirmish of half an hour retired as hastily as they had advanced. In this affair three of the sailors were wounded, and the force returned unmolested at leisure to the vessel. On the 29th, the same officer on board of the Hale, Lieutenant-Commanding Gillis, with Assistant-Surgeon Brintnall, Mate Henry Parsons, 22 men, and a boat armed with a howitzer, proceeded to destroy a battery of the enemy near the junction of the Dawho, PawPaw, and South Edisto Rivers. When the Hale was within eighteen hundred yards, the battery opened fire and continued as the bends of the river favored. One long reach had to be made under a raking fire, but the shells from the Hale had been so effective that when the vessel was making a direct course for the battery the enemy abandoned it in haste. The wood in the rear was shelled; 20 men were landed and reached the work by passing over some three hundred yards of marshy ground. Two fine 24-pounder field piec
Paw Paw (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
en were seen advancing rapidly. They opened fire, but after a skirmish of half an hour retired as hastily as they had advanced. In this affair three of the sailors were wounded, and the force returned unmolested at leisure to the vessel. On the 29th, the same officer on board of the Hale, Lieutenant-Commanding Gillis, with Assistant-Surgeon Brintnall, Mate Henry Parsons, 22 men, and a boat armed with a howitzer, proceeded to destroy a battery of the enemy near the junction of the Dawho, PawPaw, and South Edisto Rivers. When the Hale was within eighteen hundred yards, the battery opened fire and continued as the bends of the river favored. One long reach had to be made under a raking fire, but the shells from the Hale had been so effective that when the vessel was making a direct course for the battery the enemy abandoned it in haste. The wood in the rear was shelled; 20 men were landed and reached the work by passing over some three hundred yards of marshy ground. Two fine 24-
Dawhoo River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
riflemen were seen advancing rapidly. They opened fire, but after a skirmish of half an hour retired as hastily as they had advanced. In this affair three of the sailors were wounded, and the force returned unmolested at leisure to the vessel. On the 29th, the same officer on board of the Hale, Lieutenant-Commanding Gillis, with Assistant-Surgeon Brintnall, Mate Henry Parsons, 22 men, and a boat armed with a howitzer, proceeded to destroy a battery of the enemy near the junction of the Dawho, PawPaw, and South Edisto Rivers. When the Hale was within eighteen hundred yards, the battery opened fire and continued as the bends of the river favored. One long reach had to be made under a raking fire, but the shells from the Hale had been so effective that when the vessel was making a direct course for the battery the enemy abandoned it in haste. The wood in the rear was shelled; 20 men were landed and reached the work by passing over some three hundred yards of marshy ground. Two
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
erican ensign was hoisted on the lighthouse as a sign of quiet possession. At high water on the afternoon of the 10th, the gunboats Ottawa, Seneca, and Pembina crossed the bar and at sunset anchored near Mayport Mills, three miles up the river. Every vessel had on board a company of troops of the Fourth New Hampshire. The Wabash then left the anchorage for Mosquito Inlet, fifty-one miles south of St. Augustine. It had been used to some extent by small vessels transporting arms from Nassau. The Penguin and the Henry Andrew had been sent some days before, the first-named to remain off the inlet and the second to pass within and protect from destruction a large amount of Government live-oak ready for shipment. The commanding officers of those vessels, with 43 armed men, had gone some fifteen or eighteen miles up the river, and having returned within sight of the Henry Andrew, the line of order was no longer observed. The two commanding officers, quite in advance of the othe
Cumberland Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
and set fire to the end of the trestle-work leading to the bridge. The Huron was sent up; the Confederate soldiers vanished, and the fire was put out. Captain Drayton reported: The batteries on and near Fort Clinch on the southern part of Cumberland Island and at New Fernandina, although many guns had been removed, might have offered very serious obstacles to our approach. As stated before, the enemy had been busy for several days in removing heavy guns, for the purpose of transporting therom a vessel would be the merest chance. A battery of six guns is equally well sheltered and masked. These batteries and the heavy guns on Fort Clinch commanded the sea entrance completely; another battery of four guns on the south end of Cumberland Island commands the channel after crossing the bar. Within the harbor was found another wellcon-structed battery. Our forces had captured Port Royal, but the enemy had given as Fernandina. Brigadier-General H. G. Wright came into the harbor on
Lake Beresford (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
, promptly sent a force under General Brannan, which was landed at a favorable point. The gunboats attacked the battery on the 5th of October, which led to the hasty abandonment of the works and the seizure of them by our troops. The armed steamer Darlington, captured, as the reader will remember, by Commander Rodgers at Fernandina, Lieutenant-Commander Williams, with Company E Forty-seventh Pennsylvania regiment on board, and the Hale, Lieutenant-Commander Snell, ascended the river to Lake Beresford, two hundred and thirty miles, and captured the steamer Morton, one of the best on the river and engaged in the transportation of arms and munitions. General Brannan wrote to the flag-officer: Commander Steedman exhibited a zeal and perseverance in every instance, whether in aiding my forces to effect a landing, the ascent of St. John's river two hundred and thirty miles, or the assistance to one of my transports, unfortunately injured in crossing the bar, that is deserving of all prai
Doboy Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
he Potomska, accompanied by the Pocahontas, to open the inland route to the Altamahaz in doing this he had to remove two double rows of piles several miles apart. They had been sawed off at low water mark to make them more difficult to remove. Their removal took so much time that he did not arrive near Darien until late; he there found two steamers leaving under a heavy head of steam. The brass sleeves of the propeller shaft of the Potomska had given out, which induced him to return to Doboy Island. Darien, as well as Brunswick, had been deserted. The operations against Fernandina led to the abandonment of the entire coast line defence by batteries, and to points sufficiently high up on the rivers to embarrass an attack by gunboats, except the defences of Charleston, and of Pulaski, the outer defence of Savannah, which was soon to fall. Skiddaway and Green Island batteries were reported abandoned, and the guns taken for the defence of the immediate vicinity of Savannah. Afte
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