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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Montauk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ly effected until the 28th. She also had a bronze yoke put in to avoid a future mishap, such as the Patapsco and Nahant had undergone. The last-named, and indeed all of the monitor class, had bronze yokes placed in the carriages upon which the Xi-inch guns were mounted. All of them, too, had one-inch plates of iron placed over the magazines, and the vessels that had not powerful centrifugal pumps already were so fitted. On the 25th the Weehawken, Nahant, Patapsco, and Catskill left Port Royal under tow for North Edisto Inlet—an excellent harbor within twenty miles of Charleston Bar. The repairs and fitments of the Passaic, Montauk, and Keokuk detained them until the 1st of April, when they also proceeded to North Edisto, where they had been preceded by the Nantucket—another monitor which had arrived from the North on the 13th of March. The vessels were amply supplied with ammunition, and were fully prepared, as far as they could be, to make the intended attack on Fort Sumt
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
on the nearest ram, which deviated twice from her course in order to return the fire. The Housatonic was not struck, however, and it was supposed she had injured the pilot-house of the ram and shot away her flag-staff. The rams entered Charleston Harbor, and were not seen until late in the afternoon, when the mist partially lifted and showed them at anchor in the Maffitt Channel, near Fort Moultrie, visible from the assigned anchorage of the Housatonic. The following proclamation was iss. 1863. Sir: Having seen a proclamation issued by General Beauregard and Commodore Ingraham to the effect that upon the morning of the 31st ult. they had, by force of arms, succeeded in dispersing the blockading fleet which was lying off Charleston Harbor, and also a statement purporting to have come from the English Consul for that port, and the commanding officer of the English man-of-war Petrel, that they had gone out to a point five miles beyond the usual anchorage of the blockading flee
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
rsed, or drove off and out of sight, for the time, the entire hostile fleet. Therefore, we, the undersigned commanders, respectively, of the Confederate States naval and land forces in this quarter, hereby formally declare the blockade by the United States of the said city of Charleston, S. C., to be raised by a superior force of the Confederate States, from and after this 31st day of January, A. D. 1863. G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. D. N. Ingraham, Commanding Naval Forces in South Carolina. Official: Thomas Jordan, Chief-of-Staff. The results of the engagement are: two vessels sunk, four set on fire, and the remainder driven away. Yesterday afternoon General Beauregard placed a steamer at the disposal of the foreign consuls to see for themselves that no blockade existed. The French and Spanish Consuls accepted the invitation. The British Consul, with the commander of the British war-steamer Petrel, had previously gone five miles beyond the usual anchorage of the b
Le Roy (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ill firing upon us directed the colors to be rehoisted and resumed our fire from the after battery. Now the enemy, either injured or to avoid the squadron approaching, sheered off toward the harbor, exchanging shots with the Housatonic, which vessel was in chase. Fore and aft sail was put on the ship, sent yards aloft and bent sails; the Memphis took the vessel in tow for Port Royal. The port battery was run in to heel the ship, to prevent inflow from shot-holes at the water-line. See Le Roy's Report. Surgeon Gotwold and 19 men were killed and 20 wounded, the greater number of the casualties being caused by the steam. The Housatonic, Captain William Rogers Taylor, senior officer present on the blockade, was at anchor farthest to the north and east, near Rattlesnake Shoal. The firing had been heard, but as it was a very usual occurrence, no apprehension of attack was entertained; the cause of the firing was conjectured to be due to an attempt to run the blockade. At early da
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
els on the blockade, were temporarily absent, coaling at Port Royal, leaving only one vessel of size built for war purposes, of a temporary character enabled the Mercedita to reach Port Royal during the day without being towed. The rams then app and bent sails; the Memphis took the vessel in tow for Port Royal. The port battery was run in to heel the ship, to prevehead City, N. C., on board steamer Cossack, destined for Port Royal. Upon the morning of the 31st, when near Charleston, co blockade. The Keystone State necessarily was ordered to Port Royal for repairs. The Unadilla returned to her usual anchoraeen lying alongside of the Housatonic, was despatched to Port Royal, by order of the senior officer, one hour and a half afton after this raid, the New Ironsides, then at anchor in Port Royal, a vessel built under far more favorable auspices than c 25th the Weehawken, Nahant, Patapsco, and Catskill left Port Royal under tow for North Edisto Inlet—an excellent harbor wit
Morehead City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
orage of the blockading fleet, and that not a single vessel could be seen, even with the aid of powerful glasses, and that, consequently, the blockade had been most effectually raised, and knowing, as we do, the above statement to be utterly false in every particular, we feel constrained to tender our evidence as corroboratory of that already furnished. On the evening of January 29th, the One Hundred and Seventy-sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Militia (with which we are connected) left Morehead City, N. C., on board steamer Cossack, destined for Port Royal. Upon the morning of the 31st, when near Charleston, could hear firing distinctly. Upon our arrival off the harbor, which was at about 8.30 A. M., found lying there the blockading squadron, some of which were at anchor, and also the prize steamer Princess Royal. The distance from land at which they were was estimated to be from four to five miles; and although the morning was somewhat hazy, yet the land could be plainly seen on eac
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
d certain that their casemates would not have resisted Xv-inch shells. The wonder is, that under so man disadvantages, they should have ventured to construct any vessels. In every case the labor was without compensating result, if we except the structure on the hull of the frigate Merrimac, known as the Virginia to the Confederates, which, after the destruction of the sailing frigates Congress and Cumberland at Newport News, was soon after consigned to the flames as a result of the fall of Norfolk. Soon after this raid, the New Ironsides, then at anchor in Port Royal, a vessel built under far more favorable auspices than could obtain within the limits of the Confederacy, was added to the blockading force off Charleston. We may suppose, without derogation to the enemy, that she exercised a powerful restraining influence on the Confederate rams within that port. The enemy, as we have seen, having felt the power of guns afloat where many of them could be brought to bear, no longe
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
lly effected until the 28th. She also had a bronze yoke put in to avoid a future mishap, such as the Patapsco and Nahant had undergone. The last-named, and indeed all of the monitor class, had bronze yokes placed in the carriages upon which the Xi-inch guns were mounted. All of them, too, had one-inch plates of iron placed over the magazines, and the vessels that had not powerful centrifugal pumps already were so fitted. On the 25th the Weehawken, Nahant, Patapsco, and Catskill left Port Royal under tow for North Edisto Inlet—an excellent harbor within twenty miles of Charleston Bar. The repairs and fitments of the Passaic, Montauk, and Keokuk detained them until the 1st of April, when they also proceeded to North Edisto, where they had been preceded by the Nantucket—another monitor which had arrived from the North on the 13th of March. The vessels were amply supplied with ammunition, and were fully prepared, as far as they could be, to make the intended attack on Fort Sumt
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
the Montauk, Commander John L. Worden, to Ossabaw, to operate up the Great Ogeechee, and capture, if he could, the fort at Genesis Point (known afterward as Fort McAllister), under cover of which was lying the Nashville, a large side-wheel steamer, a blockade-runner fitted for a cruiser under the Confederate flag, and there for t effort to escape. Then she withdrew up the river, and reappeared after a length of time fitted as a privateer. To defend her and the railroad bridge above, Fort McAllister was strengthened, and a diagonal row of piles driven, having a line of torpedoes below them. The vessel had appeared from time to time ready to make a dash smac, which gave him a world-wide reputation. The Rear-Admiral thought it desirable to further test the mechanical appliances of the monitors in an attack on McAllister before entering on more important operations, and as well to give the officers and men the advantage of target practice with their new ordnance; he therefore or
Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
intended attack on Charleston and under an apprehension of attack on Savannah, turned his attention to strengthening the defences of those cities by every means within his power. He looked with apprehension, as the people of the North looked with hope and expectation, upon the arrival of the monitor class of vessels that were completed and of others under construction, intended particularly for the attack on Charleston. In the early part of January several of them were already south of Cape Hatteras, where the Monitor, the original vessel of that type, foundered at sea, and at the same time the Montauk and the Passaic were in great peril. Several of these vessels which arrived out in advance of others of their class intended for the attack on Charleston were sent by Rear-Admiral Dupont The title of flag-officer had been changed by law to that of Rear-Admiral since the operations of the preceding year. to the Great Ogeechee River. The Rear-Admiral informed the Department on
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